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Bruce Usher Named Co-Director of Columbia’s Social Enterprise Program

Bruce Usher, an adjunct professor of finance and economics, has been named co-director of Columbia Business School’s Social Enterprise Program. He joins Ray Fisman, who will serve as the other co-director of the social entrepreneurship initiative and who was recently named to P&Q’s 40 Best B-School Professors Under 40.

In a statement, the school said that “Bruce exemplifies Columbia Business School’s mission to bridge academic theory and real-world practice. Bruce has been teaching at the school since 2001 and was also the CEO of EcoSecurities Group through 2009.”

Prior to his work at EcoSecurities, Bruce also served as co-founder and CEO of TreasuryConnect, COO of The Williams Capital Group, and vice president at Lehman Brothers in New York and Tokyo.

Usher has taught several courses offered by the Social Enterprise program, including Finance & Sustainability and Carbon Finance. He has also provided career advice to MBA students in his capacity as Executive in Residence. His new role as co-director will give students more opportunities to learn about the intersection of finance and social enterprise, the school said. Bruce offers highly complementary experience to Ray Fisman – Ray has expertise in corruption in emerging markets, corporate social responsibility, economic development, and managerial economics.

Noteworthy graduates of the Social Enterprise Program include:

Justine Zinkin ‘02, Executive Director, Credit Where Credit Is Due, a comprehensive financial services model based in New York City that includes a  community development credit union as its hub, with an intensive financial education program aimed at reaching the unbanked, the organization’s target market

Ron Gonen ’04, Co-Founder and CEO of RecycleBank, a popular initiative that rewards recyclers with coupons that could be redeemed at local businesses and national chains, in order to increase recycling rates through the country

David del Ser ’08, Founder of Frogtek, which aims to boost the productivity and income of small shopkeepers in the developing world with affordable business tools that can run on mobile phones