Consulting Hiring Record At Kellogg

by John A. Byrne on

But there was also a grad who won a private equity job in New York that started at $220,000, and another MBA who got a $200,000 starting salary at a manufacturing company in Asia. “This was also a case where the person had a ton of previous work experience so he could go into a more senior role,” added Malone.

After consulting, the most popular industry destinations were financial services, including investment banking, private equity and venture capital, and technology manufacturing and services. Finance attracted 19% of the Kellogg’s Class of 2012, while tech manufacturing and services got 12%. Consumer and packaged goods was next, capturing 9% of the class.

Beyond the latest stats, Malone said that a greater percentage of students were feeling more confident about the job market. “We are seeing more people taking risks,” he told Poets&Quants. “I see an increased number of students being interested in the traditional things, like consulting, investment banking and consumer product goods. But I also see a number of them pursuing these opportunities in smaller firms and in start-ups.  I’m certainly seeing this now with the 2013s who really want to look at a full range of opportunities. That’s an exciting trend.”

Source: Kellogg 2012 Employment Report

DON’T MISS: B-SCHOOLS THAT CHURN OUT CONSULTANTS or IN CONSULTING, WHICH B-SCHOOL IS NO. 1?

1 2
  • david

    Kellogg is very weak in finance, unfortunately. It’s become a one-trick pony by being exclusively the consulting school.

  • Tom

    Depends how you define finance. If you mean investment banking, then yes, Kellogg doesn’t send as many people into the field as it used to. If you look at stats for PE and VC, though, it’s right up there with any other top school (other than HBS).

  • christine

    John, can you do a piece on Design Consulting / IDEO?

  • Sam

    John, quick question.How come the McKinsey hire numbers are different here than the article “McKinsey Ups Hires At Wharton, Tuck, Darden?”

  • cheearah1980

    You’re not accounting for selection bias. Just because a lot of students don’t go into finance from Kellogg doesn’t mean that students can’t. It’s probably more a factor of students not wanting to pursue those opportunities. Finance isn’t the end all and be all of bschool for many people.

  • Cmoney

    When I interviewed at Kellogg I noticed that a lot of 1 year MBA’s were being sponsored by consulting firms to attend the program. I am wondering if Kellogg is counting these 1 year grads as part of the pool of MBAs that are “hired”, even though the job was in the bag before they step foot on campus, as consultants after graduation.

Partner Sites: C-Change Media | Poets & Quants for Execs | Tipping the Scales | Poets & Quants for Undergrads