McCombs School of Business | Ms. Registered Nurse Entrepreneur
GMAT 630, GPA 3.59
Rice Jones | Mr. Simple Manufacturer
GRE 320, GPA 3.95
Chicago Booth | Mr. Corporate Development
GMAT 740, GPA 3.2
Tepper | Ms. Coding Tech Leader
GMAT 680, GPA 2.9
Stanford GSB | Mr. Impactful Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7
Kellogg | Mr. Hopeful Engineer
GMAT 720, GPA 7.95/10 (College follows relative grading; Avg. estimate around 7-7.3)
Wharton | Mr. Rates Trader
GMAT 750, GPA 7.6/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Former SEC Athlete
GMAT 620, GPA 3.8
Tuck | Mr. Army To MBB
GMAT 740, GPA 2.97
Columbia | Mr. Forbes 30 Under 30
GMAT 730, GPA 3.4
Stanford GSB | Mr. MBB Advanced Analytics
GMAT 750, GPA 3.1
Chicago Booth | Mr. Banker To CPG Leader
GMAT 760, GPA 7.36/10
Ross | Mr. Leading-Edge Family Business
GMAT 740, GPA 2.89
Darden | Mr. Logistics Guy
GRE Not taken Yet, GPA 3.1
Chicago Booth | Mr. Desi Boy
GMAT 740, GPA 3.0
Kellogg | Mr. Stylist & Actor
GMAT 760 , GPA 9.5
Columbia | Mr. Ambitious Chemical Salesman
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Mr. Irish Biotech Entrepreneur
GMAT 730, GPA 3.2
Stanford GSB | Mr. Cricketer Turned Engineer
GMAT 770, GPA 7.15/10
Wharton | Mr. Planes And Laws
GRE 328, GPA 3.8
McCombs School of Business | Mr. Refrad
GMAT 700, GPA 3.94
Harvard | Mr. Supply Chain Photographer
GMAT 700, GPA 3.3
Chicago Booth | Mr. Space Launch
GMAT 710, GPA 3.0
Kellogg | Ms. Product Strategist
GMAT 700, GPA 7.3/10
Columbia | Mr. MBB Consultant
GRE 339, GPA 8.28
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Avocado Farmer
GMAT 750, GPA 3.08
Georgetown McDonough | Mr. International Development Consultant
GMAT N/A, GPA 2.9

Falling Behind & Stressed Out

I’ve almost always finished all of my homework for my Manhattan GMAT course by the end of the week, but for some reason, I stalled out this week.  We’ve just passed week seven of the course and it was definitely the heaviest homework schedule thus far, with this upcoming week being much lighter.  I really can’t afford to lose speed right now.  The GMAT is only a couple weeks away and I need to kick my studies up a notch; not the other way around.

I think part of my problems had to do with the subject matter: Geometry.  I don’t know why, but I find this subject the most difficult for me to invest time in.  Maybe it’s because Geometry is the least applicable to the business world.  In my business career, I don’t think I’ll ever have a business need for the Pythagorean theorem.

The other issue is that I’ve been having trouble sleeping lately.  The insomnia has been rough and is a bit worrisome as I head closer to the GMAT test.  I know I won’t perform well if I head to the test center in a zombie like state.  I’ve already tried various remedies to improve the situation, with varying levels of success.  Benadryl, tryptophan heavy meals, and some herbal solutions.  I think the bottom line is I’m stressed out.  The whole weight of the application process is finally setting in on me, as I’m now starting to write my essays, update my resume, schedule my school visits, and getting my recommendations in line.  When I’m doing Official Guide problems, I even find myself having to re-read the problems because I’m thinking about the essays and other work down the road.  This all goes to show you the value of doing your GMAT study and your application prep separately.  If only I had a time machine.

This post is adapted from Random Wok, a blog written by Mako from Silicon Valley. You can read all of his posts at Random Wok.

Previous posts by Mako at PoetsandQuants:

Why I Want an MBA

Climbing the GMAT Mountain: 630 to 710 on a Practice Test

Do Consultants Have An Unfair Edge Over Other Applicants?