Stanford GSB | Mr. Deferred MBA Candidate
GMAT 760, GPA 4.0
Kellogg | Mr. Structural Engineer
GMAT 680, GPA 3.2
Stanford GSB | Mr. Hopeful B School Investment Analyst
GRE 334, GPA 4.0
Harvard | Mr. Air Force Seeking Feedback
GRE 329, GPA 3.2
Stanford GSB | Mr. Low GPA To Stanford
GMAT 770, GPA 2.7
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Colombian Sales Leader
GMAT 610, GPA 2.78
Darden | Mr. Anxious One
GRE 323, GPA 3.85
Stanford GSB | Ms. Eyebrows Say It All
GRE 299, GPA 8.2/10
Emory Goizueta | Mr. Family Business Turned Consultant
GMAT 640, GPA 3.0
Tuck | Ms. BFA To MBA
GMAT 700, GPA 3.96
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Hanging By A Thread
GMAT 710, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Ms. Hollywood To Healthcare
GMAT 730, GPA 2.5
Kellogg | Ms. Indian Entrepreneur
GMAT 750, GPA 3.3
Tuck | Ms. Confused One
GMAT 740, GPA 7.3/10
McCombs School of Business | Ms. Registered Nurse Entrepreneur
GMAT 630, GPA 3.59
Stanford GSB | Ms. Tech Consulting
GMAT 700, GPA 3.53
Kellogg | Mr. Danish Raised, US Based
GMAT 710, GPA 10.6 out of 12
Kellogg | Mr. Indian Engine Guy
GMAT 740, GPA 7.96 Eq to 3.7
INSEAD | Mr. Big Chill 770
GMAT 770, GPA 3-3.2
Yale | Mr. Whizzy
GMAT 720, GPA 4.22
Stanford GSB | Ms. Government To EdTech
GRE 323, GPA 14/20 (B equivalent)
Duke Fuqua | Ms. Venture Investments & Start-Ups In China
GMAT 640, GPA N/A
Wharton | Mr. Army Officer in Tech
GRE 322, GPA 3.1
INSEAD | Mr. Naval Engineer
GMAT 710, GPA 3.3
Tepper | Mr. Midwest Or Bust
GMAT 740, GPA 3.2
Darden | Ms. Environmental Engineer
GMAT 710, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Mr. Sovereign Wealth Fund
GMAT 730, GPA 3.55

How Students Plan To Pay For Their MBAs

piggygrad2One of the nagging questions that befuddles many a prospective MBA is how will they pay for the degree? The Graduate Management Admission Council just surveyed thousands of would-be students to ask them how they intend to pay for a graduate business degree.

Here’s what they said. “Although financial issues remain the most pervasive reservation expressed by prospective business school students, such reservations have declined slightly over the past few years,” according to the group’s 2015 Prospective Student survey. In 2010, half (51%) of prospective students said a graduate management education required more money than they had available compared with 48 percent in 2014.

The same five-year period saw an even greater decrease in student reservations about taking on a large financial debt (44% of prospective students in 2014, down from 49% in 2010). One big change in the past five years: An increasing amount of support is coming from parents (see below). Mommy and daddy are expected to provide 22% of the costs of a business education today, up from just 15% five years ago. Prospective students seem more reluctant to take out loans for their study, perhaps a result of all the horror stories on graduates with great loan burdens.

Expected Financial Mix, by Survey Years 2010 and 2014

Source: 2015 GMAC Prospective Student Survey

Source: 2015 GMAC Prospective Student Survey

GMAC said that growth in parental support is driven by the younger and more mobile cohort of prospective students. Domestic students, meantime, report an increase in reliance on personal savings and less on loans (see below).

The findings are based on the responses of nearly 12,000 potential graduate business students. These students, who registered on GMAC’s website in 2014, were part of a random sample collected monthly.

Expected Financial Mix, by Age and Student Mobility Preference

Source: 2015 GMAC Prospective Student Survey

Source: 2015 GMAC Prospective Student Survey