Ross | Mr. Automotive Compliance Professional
GMAT 710, GPA 3.7
Wharton | Mr. Digi-Transformer
GMAT 680, GPA 4
Stanford GSB | Ms. 2+2 Tech Girl
GRE 333, GPA 3.95
Stanford GSB | Ms. Healthcare Operations To General Management
GRE 700, GPA 7.3
Chicago Booth | Ms. CS Engineer To Consultant
GMAT 720, GPA 3.31
Kenan-Flagler | Mr. Engineer In The Military
GRE 310, GPA 3.9
Chicago Booth | Mr. Oil & Gas Leader
GMAT 760, GPA 6.85/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Seeking Fellow Program
GMAT 760, GPA 3
Wharton | Mr. Real Estate Investor
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
Cornell Johnson | Ms. Chef Instructor
GMAT 760, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Mr. Climate
GMAT 720, GPA 3.4
Wharton | Mr. New England Hopeful
GMAT 730, GPA 3.65
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Bangladeshi Data Scientist
GMAT 760, GPA 3.33
Harvard | Mr. Military Banker
GMAT 740, GPA 3.9
Ross | Ms. Packaging Manager
GMAT 730, GPA 3.47
Chicago Booth | Mr. Private Equity To Ed-Tech
GRE 326, GPA 3.4
Harvard | Mr. Gay Singaporean Strategy Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 3.3
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Electric Vehicles Product Strategist
GRE 331, GPA 3.8
Columbia | Mr. BB Trading M/O To Hedge Fund
GMAT 710, GPA 3.23
Columbia | Mr. Old Indian Engineer
GRE 333, GPA 67%
Harvard | Mr. Athlete Turned MBB Consultant
GMAT 720, GPA 3.4
Ross | Mr. Civil Rights Lawyer
GMAT 710, GPA 3.62
Stanford GSB | Mr. Co-Founder & Analytics Manager
GMAT 750, GPA 7.4 out of 10.0 - 4th in Class
Cornell Johnson | Ms. Environmental Sustainability
GMAT N/A, GPA 7.08
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Trucking
GMAT 640, GPA 3.82
Ross | Mr. Low GRE Not-For-Profit
GRE 316, GPA 74.04% First Division (No GPA)
Harvard | Mr. Marine Pilot
GMAT 750, GPA 3.98

Most & Least Popular MBA Specializations

men-and-women

Men are from Mars and women are from Venus.

That may be true for relationships. When it comes to where men and women specialize in business school, they may increasingly be following the same orbit — with a few notable exceptions.

That was one insight from a new report from Ready4, a mobile learning platform that helps students prepare for standardized tests, research schools, and find scholarships. According to Ready4’s data, men are almost twice as likely to pursue finance and consulting in MBA programs as women. However, the tables flip when it comes to accounting and marketing by a near equal 2-to-1 margin for women.

FINANCE TOPS FOR MEN AS WOMEN CHOOSE MARKETING AND ACCOUNTING

These findings are based on responses from more than 10,500 American Ready4GMAT users, including 6,699 men and 3,936 women (almost a 2-to-1 split). In the survey, conducted from March 2015 to September 2016, users were asked to identify the one concentration they were most likely to pursue in business school. The survey did not ask the reasons behind their choice, nor did it capture their target schools (though a 2016 Ready4 survey of its 250,000 global Ready4GMAT users found Harvard, Stanford, and Wharton ranked as their three most popular targets).

Nearly a quarter of the responding men—-23.41% to be exact—-planned to specialize in finance once they entered an MBA program. While finance was the most popular potential concentration for men, it only ranked third among women at 13.77%. What was the top choice for female GMAT test-takers? Marketing and accounting, which tied at 14.23% among women. These concentrations, however, generated less enthusiasm among men, chalking up 7.12% (accounting) and 6.27% (marketing) totals there.

There was also a marked enthusiasm gap between men and women in certain specializations. Men, for example, ranked strategy (4.82%) and operations management (3.52%) among their top 10 areas of study. Neither area makes the top 10 for women. Instead, their preferences include two concentrations ignored by men in the survey: health care administration (4.9%) and human resources (3.89%). Another difference involves consulting, which was chosen by 6.40% of men compared to 3.68% of women.

EXPECT GENDER DIVIDE TO CLOSE

Despite those differences, there also were several areas of agreement. In particular, both genders were increasingly gravitating toward entrepreneurship, which ranked third among men (8.27%) and fifth among women (6.02%). General management was also popular among both genders (8.66% for men and 7.16% for women), as was international business (4.67% for women and 3.43% for men).

This alignment is likely to become more of the norm, says Elad Shoushan, Founder and CEO of Ready4 and a 2014 MBA from MIT Sloan. He argues that such disparities will diminish as gender gaps continue to close across business in general. “As women continue to break down barriers in traditionally male-dominated fields such as finance,” he says, “we expect the ratios of men and women interested in each sector to steadily even out.”

Women Have More Diverse Interests

Source: Ready4GMAT report on MBA specializations

Source: Ready4GMAT report on MBA specializations

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