Harvard | Mr. Google Tech
GMAT 770, GPA 2.2
Kellogg | Mr. PE Social Impact
GMAT Waived, GPA 3.51
MIT Sloan | Mr. International Impact
GRE 326, GPA 3.5
MIT Sloan | Mr. Energy Enthusiast
GMAT 730, GPA 8.39
Chicago Booth | Ms. Future CMO
GMAT Have Not Taken, GPA 2.99
Said Business School | Mr. Global Sales Guy
GMAT 630, GPA 3.5
N U Singapore | Mr. Just And Right
GMAT 700, GPA 4.0
Georgetown McDonough | Mr. International Youngster
GMAT 720, GPA 3.55
Columbia | Mr. Chartered Accountant
GMAT 730, GPA 2.7
Chicago Booth | Mr. Controller & Critic
GMAT 750, GPA 6.61 / 7.00 (equivalent to 3.78 / 4.00)
Harvard | Mr. Spanish Army Officer
GMAT 710, GPA 3
Kellogg | Mr. Cancer Engineer
GRE 326, GPA 3.3
Chicago Booth | Mr. Financial Analyst
GMAT 750, GPA 3.78
Kellogg | Mr. CPA To MBA
GMAT Waived, GPA 3.2
Stanford GSB | Ms. Sustainable Finance
GMAT Not yet taken- 730 (expected), GPA 3.0 (Equivalent of UK’s 2.1)
Kenan-Flagler | Mr. Healthcare Provider
GMAT COVID19 Exemption, GPA 3.68
Kellogg | Ms. MBA For Social Impact
GMAT 720, GPA 3.9
MIT Sloan | Ms. International Technologist
GMAT 740, GPA 3.5
UCLA Anderson | Ms. Art Historian
GRE 332, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Mr. Harvard Hopeful
GMAT 740, GPA 3.8
Yale | Mr. Philanthropy Chair
GMAT Awaiting Scores (expect 700-720), GPA 3.3
Columbia | Mr. Startup Musician
GRE Applying Without a Score, GPA First Class
Chicago Booth | Ms. Entrepreneur
GMAT 690, GPA 3.5
Columbia | Mr. MGMT Consulting
GMAT 700, GPA 3.56
Harvard | Mr. Future Family Legacy
GMAT Not Yet Taken (Expected 700-750), GPA 3.0
Wharton | Mr. Big 4
GMAT 770, GPA 8/10
Rice Jones | Mr. ToastMasters Treasurer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7

Make A Great Impression At MBA Admissions Receptions

As a prospective business school student, you may be curious about the admissions receptions that many schools hold, both domestically and abroad. Here are some tips about how to make a great impression at MBA admissions receptions.

  • Don’t feel obligated to ask questions.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with listening to the presentation. Please don’t feel like you have to raise your hand just for the sake of speaking.

  • If you do ask questions, be thoughtful.

The best questions cover information that you can’t just find on the website. Inquiries about the culture, favorite aspects of the school, new programs and how to connect with students and alums can all be appropriate.

  • Don’t ask for a profile evaluation.

It is rarely (if ever) appropriate to ask an admissions officer to assess your chances of admission. Receptions are an especially poor place to ask for feedback about your individual candidacy, so please refrain.

  • Don’t ask the admissions officer to sell you on their school.

While hosting receptions around the globe, I was often asked to explain why Tuck was the best MBA program, or why this applicant should choose Tuck over other schools. This is not a good tactic – there is no one “best” MBA program, and while most representatives are very positive about the schools they represent they are not going to denigrate other programs.

  • Be polite.

Admissions officers notice people, and they remember behavior. It does not look good to arrive late, talking on your cell phone, or to sit in the front row texting and watching you tube videos. The admissions officer hosting the reception may well interview you at a later date, or lead an on campus information session, and you want them to have a positive association with you.

  • Keep it simple.

If you feel comfortable approaching the admissions representative, but don’t have anything in particular to say, consider introducing yourself and thanking them for the presentation. Be positive about the school and gracious – and bring business cards in case the officer asks you for your contact information.


 

North Star AdmissionsKaren has more than 12 years of experience evaluating candidates for admission to Dartmouth College and to the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. Since founding North Star Admissions Consulting in 2012, she has helped applicants gain admission to the nation’s top schools, including Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Wharton, MIT, Tuck, Columbia, Kellogg, Booth, Haas, Duke, Johnson, Ross, NYU, UNC, UCLA, Georgetown and more. Over the last three years, clients have been awarded more than 14.6 million dollars in scholarships, and more than 95% have gotten into one of their top choice schools.