MIT Sloan | Mr. Low GPA Over Achiever
GMAT 700, GPA 2.5
Georgetown McDonough | Mr. Aspiring Consultant
GMAT 690, GPA 3.68
NYU Stern | Ms. Art World
GRE 322, GPA 3.3
NYU Stern | Mr. Hail Mary 740
GMAT 740, GPA 2.94
Stanford GSB | Mr. Energy Focus
GMAT 760, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Mr. Big Tech Engineer
GRE 332, GPA 3.95
IU Kelley | Ms. Biracial Single Mommy
, GPA 2.5/3.67 Grad
Berkeley Haas | Ms. 10 Years Experience
GMAT To be taken, GPA 3.1
Yale | Mr. Army Infantry Officer
GMAT 730, GPA 2.83
Yale | Ms. Social Impact AKS
GRE 315, GPA 7.56
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Hanging By A Thread
GMAT 710, GPA 3.8
Kellogg | Mr. Bird Watcher
GRE 333, GPA 2.9
INSEAD | Ms. Low GPA, Big Ambitions
GRE 2.64, GPA 2.64
Harvard | Mr. Relationship Manager
GMAT 750, GPA 3.8
Kellogg | Mr. Chief Product Officer
GMAT 740, GPA 77.53% (First Class with Distinction, Dean's List Candidate)
Harvard | Mr. Political Consultant
GRE 337, GPA 3.85
MIT Sloan | Mr. Refinery Engineer
GMAT 700- will retake, GPA 3.87
Said Business School | Mr. Across The Pond
GMAT 680, GPA 2.8
Stanford GSB | Mr. Singing Banking Lawyer
GMAT 720, GPA 110-point scale. Got 110/110 with honors
Stanford GSB | Mr. Corp Finance
GMAT 740, GPA 3.75
Kellogg | Mr. Marketing Maven
GRE 325, GPA 7.6/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Vroom Vroom
GMAT 760, GPA 2.88
N U Singapore | Ms. Biomanager
GMAT 520, GPA 2.8
Wharton | Mr. Army & Consulting
GMAT 760, GPA 4.0
Berkeley Haas | Mr. 360 Consultant
GMAT 720, GPA 3.4
Harvard | Mr. Improve Healthcare
GMAT 730, GPA 2.8
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Wake Up & Grind
GMAT 700, GPA 3.5

How To Strengthen Your Quant Profile For Business School

Business schools want reassurance that you can handle the quantitative aspects of the curriculum.  If you have a low quant percentile on the GMAT or GRE, or a weak undergraduate record in quantitative courses, here are tips about how you can strengthen your quant profile for business school. •	Testing First of all, it’s helpful to understand what scores business schools like to see on the standardized exams. Although it is absolutely possible to get in with scores lower than this, the general rule is that you want to have at least a 68th percentile quant score on the GMAT, and at least a 70th percentile quant score on the GRE. Anything below that tends to trigger additional scrutiny, including a closer examination of your undergraduate grades.   If you are having trouble crossing this threshold on the GMAT, consider trying the GRE. The quant section is generally considered to be easier, especially for applicants who haven’t taken a lot of math classes.   Also, if you have a weak undergraduate GPA and think that the committee will be concerned about your academic qualifications in a general sense, quantitative or not, definitely invest the right time and resources to get a representative test score. It can go a long way in reassuring the committee that you can handle the work. (And it’s also obviously better not to apply with two metrics that are below your target school’s averages.)   •	Additional Classes If you didn’t take quantitative courses in college, or if you did take them but struggled, definitely consider taking additional courses now. The most impactful courses will be comparable to what you will find during your first year of business school (Statistics, Financial Accounting, Corporate Finance.) Classes taken in-person at the most rigorous possible institution are also optimal, and you should always take the class for a grade.   If you can’t take the class in person, I suggest looking at UC Berkeley extension courses online. HBX core is another good online option, and is comprehensive and rigorous.   Finally, if you do have weak quant grades, consider addressing them in an optional essay – ideally while drawing their attention to other indicators of your ability to handle the work.   •	Professional Experience and Certifications In some cases, you can highlight CPA or Series 6 or 7 licenses as additional evidence of quantitative ability. If you have an especially analytical job, you can also highlight those skills and ask your recommenders to get specific about your ability to manipulate data, etc. Definitely leverage the quantitative aspects of your professional experience, but consider this to be supplemental information. The schools are still going to scrutinize your grades and test scores.     There are many ways to strengthen your quant profile for business school. As with all aspects of the application process, it’s critical to be self-aware and proactive. And remember that schools are receptive to learning more about your ability to succeed.  Karen has more than 12 years of experience evaluating candidates for admission to Dartmouth College and to the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. Since founding North Star Admissions Consulting in 2012, she has helped applicants gain admission to the nation’s top schools, including Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Wharton, MIT, Tuck, Columbia, Kellogg, Booth, Haas, Duke, Johnson, Ross, NYU, UNC, UCLA, Georgetown and more. Clients have been awarded more than 19.9 million dollars in scholarships, and more than 96% have gotten into one of their top choice schools.

Business schools want reassurance that you can handle the quantitative aspects of the curriculum.  If you have a low quant percentile on the GMAT or GRE, or a weak undergraduate record in quantitative courses, here are tips about how you can strengthen your quant profile for business school.

  • Testing

First of all, it’s helpful to understand what scores business schools like to see on the standardized exams. Although it is absolutely possible to get in with scores lower than this, the general rule is that you want to have at least a 68th percentile quant score on the GMAT, and at least a 70th percentile quant score on the GRE. Anything below that tends to trigger additional scrutiny, including a closer examination of your undergraduate grades.

If you are having trouble crossing this threshold on the GMAT, consider trying the GRE. The quant section is generally considered to be easier, especially for applicants who haven’t taken a lot of math classes.

Also, if you have a weak undergraduate GPA and think that the committee will be concerned about your academic qualifications in a general sense, quantitative or not, definitely invest the right time and resources to get a representative test score. It can go a long way in reassuring the committee that you can handle the work. (And it’s also obviously better not to apply with two metrics that are below your target school’s averages.)

  • Additional Classes

If you didn’t take quantitative courses in college, or if you did take them but struggled, definitely consider taking additional courses now. The most impactful courses will be comparable to what you will find during your first year of business school (Statistics, Financial Accounting, Corporate Finance.) Classes taken in-person at the most rigorous possible institution are also optimal, and you should always take the class for a grade.

If you can’t take the class in person, I suggest looking at UC Berkeley extension courses online. HBX core is another good online option, and is comprehensive and rigorous.

Finally, if you do have weak quant grades, consider addressing them in an optional essay – ideally while drawing their attention to other indicators of your ability to handle the work.

  • Professional Experience and Certifications

In some cases, you can highlight CPA or Series 6 or 7 licenses as additional evidence of quantitative ability. If you have an especially analytical job, you can also highlight those skills and ask your recommenders to get specific about your ability to manipulate data, etc. Definitely leverage the quantitative aspects of your professional experience, but consider this to be supplemental information. The schools are still going to scrutinize your grades and test scores.

There are many ways to strengthen your quant profile for business school. As with all aspects of the application process, it’s critical to be self-aware and proactive. And remember that schools are receptive to learning more about your ability to succeed.


North Star Admissions LogoKaren has more than 12 years of experience evaluating candidates for admission to Dartmouth College and to the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. Since founding North Star Admissions Consulting in 2012, she has helped applicants gain admission to the nation’s top schools, including Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Wharton, MIT, Tuck, Columbia, Kellogg, Booth, Haas, Duke, Johnson, Ross, NYU, UNC, UCLA, Georgetown and more. Clients have been awarded more than 19.9 million dollars in scholarships, and more than 96% have gotten into one of their top choice schools.