Tepper | Mr. Climb The Ladder
GRE 321, GPA 3.1
Darden | Mr. MBB Aspirant/Tech
GMAT 700, GPA 3.16
MIT Sloan | Mr. Marine Combat Arms Officer
GMAT 710, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Ms. Indian Non-Engineer
GMAT 740, GPA 9.05/10
Stanford GSB | Ms. Engineering To Finance
GRE 333, GPA 3.76
Stanford GSB | Ms. Anthropologist
GMAT 740, GPA 3.3
Wharton | Ms. Product Manager
GMAT 730, GPA 3.4
Kellogg | Mr. PM To Tech Co.
GMAT 720, GPA 3.2
UCLA Anderson | Ms. Tech In HR
GMAT 640, GPA 3.23
MIT Sloan | Mr. Electrical Agri-tech
GRE 324, GPA 4.0
MIT Sloan | Mr. Aker 22
GRE 332, GPA 3.4
Duke Fuqua | Ms. Consulting Research To Consultant
GMAT 710, GPA 4.0 (no GPA system, got first (highest) division )
Stanford GSB | Mr. Future Tech In Healthcare
GRE 313, GPA 2.0
Cornell Johnson | Ms. Environmental Sustainability
GMAT N/A, GPA 7.08
Harvard | Mr. Gay Singaporean Strategy Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 3.3
Stanford GSB | Ms. Creative Data Scientist
GMAT 710, GPA 3.0
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Military To MGMNT Consulting
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
MIT Sloan | Mr. Agri-Tech MBA
GRE 324, GPA 4.0
Wharton | Mr. Data Scientist
GMAT 740, GPA 7.76/10
Harvard | Ms. Nurturing Sustainable Growth
GRE 300, GPA 3.4
MIT Sloan | Ms. Senior PM Unicorn
GMAT 700, GPA 3.18
Harvard | Mr. Lieutenant To Consultant
GMAT 760, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Mr. “GMAT” Grimly Miserable At Tests
GMAT TBD - Aug. 31, GPA 3.9
Yale | Mr. IB To Strategy
GRE 321, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Mr. Overrepresented MBB Consultant (2+2)
GMAT 760, GPA 3.95
Kellogg | Ms. Freelance Hustler
GRE 312, GPA 4
Kellogg | Ms. Gap Fixer
GMAT 740, GPA 3.02

Entrepreneurship At Gies

Manu Edakara of iVenture Accelerator

Manu Edakara, Associate Director, Origin Ventures Academy for Entrepreneurial Leadership

I’m going to be a college student and I have a business idea. How can I use my college experience to help me develop that?

College is the best time to start working on making your idea a business! Think about it; very few responsibilities (time), tons of like-minded ambitious dreamers around you (potential co-founders), and a slew of grants and opportunities specific for student entrepreneurs (money). College should be utilized as an experimental playground, where you get to test your idea, get feedback and support, reiterate and learn.

All businesses start with one simple concept: solving a problem. How do you know if you’re solving a problem? Find people that you think suffer from that problem and interview them. You cannot build something worthwhile unless it is valuable and useful to a potential customer. Talk to potential users beforehand. Utilize their pain points and their perspective to guide you in creating something truly useful, something people are willing to pay for.

At Gies, we’re very fortunate to have entrepreneurship woven into our curriculum and programming.

In our Origin Ventures Academy for Entrepreneurial Leadership, we have tons of opportunities for students interested in innovation and change-making, such as the 3 Day Startup (a weekend program focused on creating social and environmental impact), the Entrepreneurship Workshop (taking a tour of cities like Chicago to see the different types of careers entrepreneurship can lead you to), Map the System (exploring problems related to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals), EntreCORPS (consulting for startups), Entrepreneurs Without Borders (learning about social innovation in global markets), and the iVenture Accelerator, the educational accelerator for the top student startups at the University of Illinois. As you can see, entrepreneurship is a spectrum, and not a one size fits all. Use college to figure out what works best for you!

Read more about Gies on our Partner Publisher page.