UCLA Anderson | Mr. Microsoft India
GMAT 780, GPA 7.14
Harvard | Mr. Public Health
GRE 312, GPA 3.3
Rice Jones | Mr. ToastMasters Treasurer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7
Kellogg | Mr. Hopeful Admit
GMAT Waived, GPA 4.0
Kellogg | Mr. IDF Commander
GRE Waved, GPA 3.0
Harvard | Mr. Community Impact
GMAT 690, GPA 3.0
Berkeley Haas | Mx. CPG Marketer
GMAT 750, GPA 3.95
Kenan-Flagler | Mr. Healthcare Provider
GMAT COVID19 Exemption, GPA 3.68
Stanford GSB | Mr. Brazilian Tech
GMAT 730, GPA Top 10%
Wharton | Mr. Philanthropist
GRE 324, GPA 3.71
INSEAD | Ms. Investment Officer
GMAT Not taken, GPA 16/20 (French scale)
McCombs School of Business | Mr. Startup Of You
GMAT 770, GPA 2.4
NYU Stern | Mr. Washed-Up Athlete
GRE 325, GPA 3.4
Harvard | Mr. Belgium 2+2
GMAT 760, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Mr. Future Family Legacy
GMAT Not Yet Taken (Expected 700-750), GPA 3.0
Columbia | Mr. Chartered Accountant
GMAT 730, GPA 2.7
Harvard | Mr. Google Tech
GMAT 770, GPA 2.2
Kellogg | Mr. Operations Analyst
GMAT Waived, GPA 3.3
London Business School | Mr. Consulting To IB
GMAT 700, GPA 2.4
Cornell Johnson | Mr. SAP SD Analyst
GMAT 660, GPA 3.60
Ross | Mr. Professional MMA
GMAT 640, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Mr. Healthcare Investment
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Mr. Tech Exec
GMAT N/A, GPA 2.4
Wharton | Ms. Project Mananger
GMAT 770, GPA 3.86
MIT Sloan | Mr. NFL Team Analyst
GMAT 720, GPA 3.8
Kellogg | Mr. Big Beer
GMAT Waived, GPA 4.0
Harvard | Ms. Indian Quant
GMAT 750, GPA 7.54/10

Entrepreneurship At Gies

Manu Edakara of iVenture Accelerator

Manu Edakara, Associate Director, Origin Ventures Academy for Entrepreneurial Leadership

I’m going to be a college student and I have a business idea. How can I use my college experience to help me develop that?

College is the best time to start working on making your idea a business! Think about it; very few responsibilities (time), tons of like-minded ambitious dreamers around you (potential co-founders), and a slew of grants and opportunities specific for student entrepreneurs (money). College should be utilized as an experimental playground, where you get to test your idea, get feedback and support, reiterate and learn.

All businesses start with one simple concept: solving a problem. How do you know if you’re solving a problem? Find people that you think suffer from that problem and interview them. You cannot build something worthwhile unless it is valuable and useful to a potential customer. Talk to potential users beforehand. Utilize their pain points and their perspective to guide you in creating something truly useful, something people are willing to pay for.

At Gies, we’re very fortunate to have entrepreneurship woven into our curriculum and programming.

In our Origin Ventures Academy for Entrepreneurial Leadership, we have tons of opportunities for students interested in innovation and change-making, such as the 3 Day Startup (a weekend program focused on creating social and environmental impact), the Entrepreneurship Workshop (taking a tour of cities like Chicago to see the different types of careers entrepreneurship can lead you to), Map the System (exploring problems related to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals), EntreCORPS (consulting for startups), Entrepreneurs Without Borders (learning about social innovation in global markets), and the iVenture Accelerator, the educational accelerator for the top student startups at the University of Illinois. As you can see, entrepreneurship is a spectrum, and not a one size fits all. Use college to figure out what works best for you!

Read more about Gies on our Partner Publisher page.