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George Washington University

Business School Announces Special Grants

George Washington University’s School of Business will offer “special” grants to graduating seniors that will cover a portion of advanced degree tuition for fall 2020.

The GWSB Grants for 2020 GW Graduates is meant to support undergraduate seniors whose post-grad plans may have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, The GW Hatchet reports.

“The Class of 2020 is facing unprecedented challenges, graduating into an uncertain job market,” GWSB Dean Anuj Mehrotra says. “A question many graduating seniors ask is whether they should go directly to work following graduation or earn an advanced degree. For those graduating students who wish to take graduate business classes this fall, GWSB will offer tuition assistance in the form of a grant.”

HOW IT WORKS

All graduating seniors of GWU’s class of 2020 are eligible for the grants.

The tuition grant applies to 12 specialized master’s degrees and 24 graduate certificates at the School of Business.

Participating students can receive 25% to 50% off on tuition for any course they plan to enroll in during the fall. Students, however, will be required to complete the coursework no later than spring 2023.

Additionally, the grant will not cover fees such as enrollment costs.

SETTING UP STRONG CAREER SUCCESS

GWSB officials say they hope the grants will help students who are entering the workforce during an unprecedented time.

“We invite GW graduating seniors to consider taking hard-skill and soft-skill courses that will strengthen their resumes based on their career aspirations,” Liesl Riddle, GWSB associate dean for graduate programs, says. “All of our graduate education programs have been adapted to fit the contemporary needs for students that want to earn respected and competitive credit-bearing credentials while focusing on their careers.”

Sources: The GW Hatchet, George Washington University

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