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Thank You Letter Tips

Giving thanks can go a long way. Especially when it comes to MBA admissions.

“A thank you note really does matter,” Judith Silverman Hodara, Fortuna Admissions Director and former acting director of MBA Admissions at the Wharton School, writes in a blog post. “It also sends the message to the MBA admissions committee that you’re someone who isn’t too busy to pause, reflect and offer a sincere appreciation.”

But what’s the best way to write a thank you note and how much is too much?

STAY FORMAL

Hodara stresses the importance of knowing your audience. While the admissions process is relation-focused, she says applicants should still err on the side of formal.

“Avoid emoticons, casual acronyms (LOL), and chat/text shorthand (u/you, r/are, def/definitely),” Hodara writes. “No matter how comfortable you feel with an interviewer, alum, or student ambassador, always treat them with the same respect you would treat the CEO of your company.”

MUST-HAVES

Shorter is often better. Experts say there are really only two must-haves when it comes to a thank you note for admissions officers.

“[One] thank the interviewer for his or her time and [two] reiterate your interest in the program,” Stacy Blackman, of Stacy Blackman Consulting, writes. “If you can throw in a sentence or two that references something you talked about, all the better. But a thank-you note is not the place to try and sell yourself any further or write another mini-essay. The point is to show that you’re excited about and thankful for the opportunity to be considered for a spot in Program X.”

SPELL CHECK, GRAMMAR CHECK, TONE CHECK

Lastly, you’ll want to ensure your note is free of any grammatical or spelling errors. Perhaps just as important, make sure the tone of your message is right.

“Write clear and concise sentences,” Hodara writes. “Especially when sending from your phone, scan your message for tone to ensure it doesn’t sound demanding, brusque, or negative – your tone always conveys a nonverbal message.”

Sources: Fortuna Admissions, Stacy Blackman Consulting

 

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