Harvard | Mr. International Oil
GMAT 710, GPA 3.7
Harvard | Mr. Food Tech Start Ups
GMAT 720, GPA 3.5
Chicago Booth | Mr. Overrepresented Indian Engineer
GMAT 740, GPA 8.78/10
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Biz Human Rights
GRE 710, GPA 8/10
Darden | Mr. Program Manager
GRE 324, GPA 3.74
Harvard | Mr. The Builder
GMAT 740, GPA 4.0
Harvard | Mr. Consulting To Emerging Markets Banking
GRE 130, GPA 3.6 equivalent
Harvard | Mr. Comeback Kid
GMAT 770, GPA 2.8
Stanford GSB | Mr. Greek Taverna
GMAT 730, GPA 7.03/10
Harvard | Ms. Biotech Ops
GMAT 770, GPA 3.53
NYU Stern | Mr. Development
GMAT 690, GPA 2.5
Chicago Booth | Mr. Energy Operations
GRE 330, GPA 3.85
Harvard | Mr. Big 4 To Healthcare Reformer
GRE 338, GPA 4.0 (1st Class Honours - UK - Deans List)
Wharton | Mr. Steelmaker To Consultant
GMAT 760, GPA 3.04/4.0
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Indian Quant
GMAT 745, GPA 9.6 out of 10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Food & Education Entrepreneur
GMAT 720, GPA 4.0
Harvard | Mr. Standard Military
GMAT 700, GPA 3.74
Harvard | Ms. Gay Engineer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Mr. Lieutenant To Consultant
GMAT 760, GPA 3.7
Duke Fuqua | Mr. IB Back Office To Front Office/Consulting
GMAT 640, GPA 2.8
Tuck | Mr. Infantry Officer To MBA
GRE 314, GPA 3.4
Rice Business | Mr. Future Energy Consultant
GRE Received a GRE Waiver, GPA 3.3
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Campaigns To Business
GMAT 750, GPA 3.19
MIT Sloan | Mr. Special Forces
GMAT 720, GPA 3.82
Columbia | Mr. Fingers Crossed
GMAT 730, GPA 3.2
Harvard | Ms. Egyptian Heritage
GRE 320, GPA 3.7
Harvard | Mr. Investor & Operator (2+2)
GMAT 720, GPA 3.85

Dartmouth’s Tuck School vs. Harvard Business School

The most obvious similarities between Dartmouth Tuck School of Business and the Harvard Business School is that they are both in New England, offer a general management approach to the MBA, teach largely on the basis of case study, boast some of the best classroom teachers in business education, and have access to the world’s leading and most prestigious employers of MBAs. They differ in another important aspect as well: both institutions are almost completely focused on full-time MBA education. There’s no part-time MBA program, no Executive MBA program, and no business undergraduates to distract the core mission of delivering the best possible full-time, two-year MBA experience. So the faculty, with the exception of their executive education work, isn’t pulled in as many directions as they are at other B-schools.

Top Ten Reasons to Go to Dartmouth?

  1. You didn’t get into Harvard, but were lucky enough to get into Tuck, one of the five best MBA programs in the world.
  2. The MBA alumni network is arguably the best and most supportive of any business school.
  3. You want a premium MBA experience at a school that is completely focused on the full-time, two-year MBA and not a host of other programs that detract from it.
  4. You thrive in smaller, intimate settings.
  5. You prefer a highly collaborative and supportive student culture.
  6. You want to create important and enduring relationships with fellow students.
  7. You want to create important and lasting relationships with faculty.
  8. You want a general management perspective.
  9. You like small towns and tend to dislike big cities.
  10. You adore the outdoors.

Top Ten Reasons to Go to Harvard?

  1. It’s number one. And if you’re from the U.S. or outside the U.S., you’ll never have to explain why you went there.
  2. It’s number one for lots of reasons: incomparable resources, prestige scale, the status of its alums, and the very best faculty most attuned to real business, not merely academic research.
  3. You want a premium MBA experience at a school that is completely focused on the full-time, two-year MBA and not a host of other programs that detract from it.
  4. You thrive in a large environment and don’t mind being a small fish in a bigger pond.
  5. You think the case method of teaching is the greatest invention ever discovered in education.
  6. You want an MBA with a general management perspective.
  7. You like the idea of competing with people in and outside the classroom for attention, grades, internships, and jobs.
  8. You don’t mind living up to extremely high expectations that are inevitable the moment you say you have a Harvard MBA.
  9. You dislike small towns and enjoy major yet manageable cities.
  10. You love Boston or want to live in Boston and root for the Boston Red Sox.