The MOOC Revolution: How To Earn An Elite MBA For Free

by Jeff Schmitt on

online EDUCATIONSo you want an MBA? But you can’t afford to take two years off and invest upwards of a quarter of a million on tuition, books, living expenses, and lost wages?

Boy, do I have a proposition for you!

Now, it’s a little unconventional. And it’ll require a load of self-discipline on your part. When it’s over, you’ll have an Ivy League education on your resume. And it won’t cost you a cent!

Sound too good to be true? Maybe it is. But I got your attention. And that’s one of the first things you learn in a foundational marketing class. And one of the world’s best business schools—Wharton—offers one of those for free through a MOOC.

A MOOC, you say? Isn’t that a slur? Maybe in Jersey. These days, MOOCs are considered by many academics to be the future of education. MOOCs — an acronym for massive open online courses—are courses that can be accessed globally over the internet. Thanks to their flexibility, students covet them.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT MOOCs

It can be hard to pinpoint exactly what a MOOC is. To paraphrase Justice Potter Stewart, you ‘know it when you see it.’  Most MOOCs rely on set start and end dates, though a few are self-paced. They can be scaled to accommodate tens-of-thousands…or just a select community. Occasionally, students can earn grades and college credits through MOOCs. Most times, they’ll just receive a certificate of completion.

Tests can be proctored, but many MOOCs rely on the honor system. Textbooks are often optional (though some courses come with eBooks and downloadable software). Although professors deliver content through videos and PowerPoints in MOOCs, many engage with students on message boards in real time (and even keep office hours for their online students). Although MOOCs are grounded in distance education, many students form regionally-based online communities to facilitate peer support.

Still, there is one characteristic that marks all MOOCs: They are available to anyone. And that’s why they’re becoming a booming business. Sure, many MOOCs are free. But they’re also drawing millions of students. That’s why platforms like Coursera, edX, and Udacity are partnering with schools to house content. For example, edX started as a consortium between Harvard and MIT – and has since added the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Texas to its membership (along with recently joining forces with Google). Coursera was launched by Stanford professors and offers undergraduate and graduate courses from programs ranging from Wharton to Stanford.

BUILDING YOUR OWN MBA CURRICULUM FOR FREE OUT OF MOOCs

And that begs the question: With so much content available for free, do students even need to enroll in college anymore? MOOCs have democratized education globally (provided you have an internet connection). Could students conceivably treat education like a build-your-own IKEA furniture?

Take business school education. For decades, entrepreneurs have counseled professionals to find a mentor and earn your MBA in the ‘school of hard knocks.’ Sounds tempting, but knowledge is power. And it’s very costly to make those same fundamental mistakes in launching a business. So ask yourself these questions: 1) What if these would-be MBA candidates could review course catalogs and identify foundational courses and electives that would fill their knowledge gaps? 2) What if they could use this research to construct a learning plan that would build their knowledge, step-by-step, like a normal curriculum? 3) And what if they could locate these courses on MOOC platforms like Coursera and edX?

It’s a tempting proposition. Imagine taking two MOOCs every eight weeks. You could theoretically finish your MBA in the same time it takes to complete a traditional program. Now, ask yourself these two key questions: 1) Is the right content available? 2) Does it come from a reputable source? The answer is both questions is “Absolutely.” You can find much of the content covered in an MBA curriculum online at little to no cost.

And even David Wilson, the outgoing chief executive of the Graduate Management Admission Council, which administers the GMAT test, says it may well be possible. “The next MBA degree may not be a degree but a portfolio of certificates,” says Wilson. “The market will determine the worth of it.”

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  • Laurie Pickard

    I’m so glad that you’re writing about this topic! I’ve been working on a

  • Laurie Pickard

    I’m so glad to see a blog post on this topic! I’ve started doing exactly what you are suggesting here about 4 months ago, and it’s going great so far. To my knowledge I’m the only person trying to create an MBA out of MOOCs – and blogging about it. Do you know of any others?

  • Sukhdeep Virk

    Hey .. YOu have a competitor from India.I also started couple of months back. When I started I was skeptical about their utility but seeing positive comments of leading academicians, I am really greatful that such fascinating content from top universities is available for free.
    It really feels great to learn sitting at our homes what a MIT grad might be learning.

  • Tom Miller

    I remember reading that there are 3 benefits for going to an “elite” MBA school. 1) The stamp of approval for getting admitted/taking the degree from a major name brand. 2) The formal education. 3) The networking from your immediate classmates and/or the Alumni network.
    So if you earn a MOOC-based competency are you loosing #1 & #3?

    I happen to believe between 80%-98% of the formal education/knowledge gained is very similar across all programs (controlling for concentrations eg. finance, marketing etc). If so, a MOOC might make sense because you have the stamp of approval of your current employer and you can use Linkedin to develop and maintain some kind of professional network.

  • Tom Miller

    Another point is if you believe the education is very similar across all MBA programs and you really want a formal MBA but don’t need that “stamp of approval” of an elite school why not take a $10,000 MBA? (Yes, you can google them).

  • Tom Miller

    I remember some research that said that most school brands make no difference in the post graduation arena. Apparently Harvard/Yale etc make some difference but other highly rated schools without major name brand recognition don’t.

  • Tom Miller

    There is a really good book on doing “cases” that is clearly pointed at elite school graduates who want to become consultants. “Case in Point” by Marc Cosentino Excellent for self study.

  • Shea Fisher

    Nice article, I discovered Mooc’s last summer and am currently finishing the Wharton marketing class which was great. I’m a big fan and agree these won’t be free forever…I’ve been plotting how to string these classes together for a self styled MBA of sorts, so, this article was well timed and very helpful!

  • Tom Miller

    The actual course listing on this article starts at page 3.

  • Howard

    Just read an article on this….curious as to how you earn an MBA by doing this? Looks like several free courses, designed to enhance your skills/knowledge, however, I’ve been unable to find a tailored curriculum that provides an accredited MBA via MOOCs. Please advise

  • Laurie Pickard

    I don’t know of any accredited MBA using MOOCs. It’s a bit of a brave new world for those of us who are trying to take enough of these free courses to add up to something like a regular degree program. My personal belief is that by taking a diversity of courses, a motivated, intelligent person can learn the same skills they would have learned in a traditional MBA. I also think we may begin to see institutions grouping these courses in tailored curricula and offering accredited degree or certificate programs, but that hasn’t happened yet – and those programs probably won’t be free either. For the moment, it is up to the student to choose their course of study and to convince future employers that the totality of the courses they’ve taken is as good as a regular MBA.

  • Howard

    It’s a brave new world, and a lot of work if your doing this for a résumé face lift. Going to be hard to sell, compared to an accredited program. None-the-less, the material is priceless, and for the cost, you can’t beat it.

  • Alana B

    I have a question about the Economics requirement. I was wondering why The Power of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics: Economic Principles in the Real World provided for by Coursera platform were not recommended?

  • Bassem

    we thought about issuing certificates for cross-university programs built out of MOOCs – what would give you comfort that this certificate is credible though?

  • Laurie Pickard

    Very good question. I’ve checked out your website, and what you’re doing is really interesting. There is also a good deal of overlap between the free MBA you’re offering and the one I’m designing. I have also been thinking along the same lines that you are – what would make a free MOOC-based MBA credible? For me, I think the answer is critical mass. If enough people do this, they will demand to be taken seriously. I think some favorable press coverage would also help. But for the moment, I wouldn’t put too much stock in any certificate, unfortunately. I tend to think that employers feel the same way, which is why I’ve gone to the trouble of making a whole website just to demonstrate what I have studied. That’s not a scalable solution, though. Just a temporary fix until somebody is able to corner the market on MOOC MBA legitimacy. It could be you. This is a topic of great interest for me, so if you want to talk more, feel free to get in touch.

  • Laurie Pickard

    I agree with you 100%. I do think you’re losing both the network and the stamp of approval, which are a huge part of the value of a regular MBA. A free MBA is worth it only if you don’t need those things, or can find another way to get them.

  • Brian Mathies

    I’m already doing it, except it’s in computer science.

  • Bassem

    Sure thing – would love to: bassem[at]skillacademy[dot]com

  • Victoria LEI

    huge thanks~~~ this is the piece which may light up my life!

  • Angela Henderson

    On what platform are you studying Computer Science? How’s it going?

  • Elisha

    I am as well. Using mainly Coursera (University of Michigan
    Introduction to Finance, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Microeconomics Principles, University of Pennsylvania
    An Introduction to Operations Management among others) as well as some Yale courses. I’m sure there are many people around the world besides you doing it. Your’e the only one who is blogging about it, and that just may be the critical mass to gain enough critical mass for actual future accreditation or at least to be taken seriously. We need to all band together and let the culture evolve and spread. If there is enough interest and movement (and I believe there is), we can change society and actually create a “true” free world class education for all (Is that someone’s motto?). Anyways, kudos and more power to us

  • Laurie Pickard

    Hi Elisha, I think you’re right that there are many of us who are trying to cobble together an MBA out of free courses. I’d love to be part of creating a forum where we can share our experiences and build our own network, and I think you’re right that we need that in order to build our credibility. In one of my recent blog posts I offered to profile anyone who reaches out to me to say that they’re doing a No-Pay MBA. That offer stands if you’re interested. Good luck with your MBA!

  • Guest

    Dear Laurie i just read about your experience trhu Fortune magazine, I reviewed your information and I am trilled to jump in the boat with you. I am currently in Bolivia I have a BA on arts , I graduated on 2001 in Chicago, yet life brought me back to my native country Bolivia. What have i done in life ….oh boy i worked on designing field ( opened my own business which was sucessful for some time) years later I obtained a broker license from the state of Illinois ,worked as a mortgage broker up until economy down fall in 2008 , once i came back o Bolivia i realized non of them worked quite well …and here I was stuck in a country were the minimun amount of time to obtain a degree in Business administration is of 5 yrs ( Bolivia ), reading you article made me see a rainbow of opportunities , I am so new and so lost that i dont know where to start but u might have changed my life :) Ill try to find a way to keep u posted :) Greetings from Bolivia !

  • Laurie Pickard

    Best of luck to you! Let me know how your free MBA goes.

  • Laurie Pickard

    What an inspiring story. Best of luck to you!

  • Paul Schroeder

    Is anything like this available for engineering or public health?

  • Maria

    I would like to know more about it. Can you send me the website or more info please. m18j14@hotmail.com

  • Cdw Sfbay

    What does this do to the accreditation of the program itself? Are you saying that if the MBA course at Stanford is the same as that of the paid MBA course then seamlessly this should equate to a free degree? Not likely..I cannot imagine that there is any transferability of credits and will this be considered an MBA from a regionally accredited program as that is the ‘gold standard’ when determining the value of a degree! Does the student get a degree conferred from Either Stanford or Wharton, or a hybrid of both, or what is the deal? Can’t exactly put MBA on a resume because you took 15 of the same classes without academy backing of that now can you??

  • Lisa

    HI Laurie, where is your blog? I am very interested..You may have it somewhere in all of the comments but well, in a rush :)

  • Cdw Sfbay

    Laurie, without a diploma conferment verification this could be problematic to employers. Many companies have a 3rd party that verifies education as a condition for employment especially if said degree is required for one to do the job. I hope that your completion does you well. Again, with the competency based courses at accredited colleges many schools are moving towards that. I know the complexity of the coursea classes and they are far from easy, but it would be nice if they were equivalent or transferrable to a regionally accredited school..

  • Andyx

    Hi. So, you can just transfer all those credits to any university? They’ll take all of those credits? What about the diploma, what university’s name will it say? Thanks for your answer and help.

  • Freementia

    I get the whole piecing your MBA together thru all the MOOC courses, but when you’re finished with all of the courses, which school issues the degree?

  • @jasonrausch

    This is a misleading article; who is issuing the degree? No one…

  • Dan Powers

    This is a very fascinating topic to me. I love the approach and the adventure in this education model. However I’m concerned that the effort of this approach to earning a MBA education will be devalued due to the lack of a “stamp of approval” from a credited institution. Is the outcome… or probably a better way to ask this is…. How can you make the outcome of the work/effort put into this education valuable in the job market? How can best leverage this approach and use it to boost your career?

  • planckbrandt

    MOOCs now mean that very few universities will decide what goes in the courses and what does not. For controversial topics like economics, this is very dangerous. The economic collapse originated at Ivy League universities, and even until now they are unrepentant about their theories that created that crisis. We certainly don’t need millions more people propagandized and deceived by these courses. It is bad enough a small group of elites who then go to Wall Street and Washington are mislead by these courses. At least with many universities, there are many professors choosing books and readings for students. With MOOCs that variety will diminish. It just puts more ideological control over our minds in fewer and fewer hands.

  • Chiara

    WOOOOHOOOO. Now I know what I have been doing for the last few months. :)

    What I love in this process is the possibility to pick all kind of knowledge that loosely fit my scope, and explore… I am less in the Financial part, and more on the organizational part.
    I think it would be interesting to share the composition of our “MOOC MBA”, and categorize them… because that could be incorporated in @brfayek:disqus ideas. Happy to collaborate on this, feel free to reach out.

  • Brian Mathies

    Try Edx dot org, Coursera dot org, or Udacity dot com.
    Udacity is teaming up with Georgia Tech, and they are offering a fully accredited masters program in computer science. The entire degree will cost about $7,000, but you can take the courses for free and get certificates for each one.

  • Brian Mathies

    I’m using mostly Coursera, but I took a couple of courses under Edx.
    So far I’ve taken 13 courses, most of them in CS, but others in other fields such as music.
    I’m enjoying the experience because I can learn whatever I want, whenever I want, and it doesn’t cost a dime.

  • Conor Spillane

    Hi Laura

    Just asking what does the real world think of the MBA.
    Regards

  • Caroline D

    Question. This all looks great but employers like to see credentials. I can’t imagine putting a list of 20 courses on my resume. How do you market yourself with MOOCs? Is there/will there be a way to actually earn an MBA designation?

  • Michael MacLean

    Issuing certificates would be a great way to generate more interest. I’m completing my MBA from Kettering University this year…earning a certificate with a specific focus would be a natural complement to my degree. Especially if that certificate comprised of classes from the Sloan, Ross and Darden programs.

  • Janice Bradley

    So glad you’ve posted this. I have been gearing up to do this but didn’t know how it could be done; I confess I was overwhelmed when I first read about this prospect. I am re-energized! Thanks!

  • Sid Sanyal

    Getting an MBA is not just about sitting somewhere and taking classes in isolation. I believe it is more about immersive and open collaboration with a group of people who have different backgrounds. The face-to-face interaction in a particular setting makes it more real and valuable than reading some online content sitting on a couch. This method of study is just an alternative for people who are seeking something else.

  • Norbert

    Guys, it’s great! Let me call your attention to the self-directed mba group on linkedin. There we could come together and get ourselves organized ano formalized, so as not to miss networking opportunities so precious in institute-driven programs.

  • Michael D. Davis

    This is amazing. I’m so glad to have come across this topic and am excited to begin learning and contributing to a new opportunity in entrepreneurial education!

  • Feather

    I hope everybody starts taking MOOC courses. The cost of college is absolutely and totally disgusting in the U.S. It is so hard for anyone to get ahead. I know many people with Master’s and Doctorates who are hundreds of thousands in debt with either no job at all or a job that isn’t worth the price they put on education they went through to get it. I’m 34 years old and I got a two year degree right out of high school, they are a few hundred a piece. Go to a four year school to finish the Bachelors and it’s upwards of $2,000 per class! I’ve been fighting to get my degree for 14 years. It’s just not right how hard this universities make it for people to succeed. You need to be one of the lucky to get a scholarship, or you need to be in debt for the rest of your life, unless of course they consider you poor enough to get grants and they don’t do that for anyone unless you’re one welfare practically living in a box! No help for the middle class! I hope in time people boycott the expensive universities and find alternative forms of education.

  • BigDan

    Would this MBA be recognized? Which school is attaching their name to your MBA?

  • kjawwad

    Hi Laurie, Thanks for the info sharing. Its really informative. will appreciate if you please describe the sources (institution web) and recommendations of courses if any.
    Kashif

  • SMClark

    Laurie,
    Thanks so much for sharing your story. I, too, have been wanting to pursue a MBA but put it off due to cost. I read all the comments and it’s great that we can all agree to disagree whether or not this approach to a MBA offers value and a solution to those who may be more interested in the education and less interested in the accreditation from a university. As a business owner, this may be a great path for me to take to hone my knowledge in business and marketing to grow my business. I am very interested in joining any effort that continues to explore creating greater value and support for MOOC courses. Please keep me in the loop. Thanks

  • Rob OMalley

    If you do this, can you add MBA to the end of your name? Is it official?

  • Lora Schafer

    this is awesome! Just curious, how would you list this on a resume? What ethical guidelines are there for listing yourself as an MBA from a mooc?

  • JohnAByrne

    Here’s how I see it: You would include a one-page overview of your MBA studies, listings the courses you’ve taken, the schools that sponsored them, the dates you completed them, and the grades you’ve received. You would divide the courses up by “core courses” and “elective courses.” And you would say you did what no mainstream MBA has ever done: Taken a full load of MBA courses on your own which demonstrated self-discipline, a thirst for learning, and the hard work to see it all through–and you are smart enough to get your MBA for free, saving yourself more than a quarter of a million dollars in tuition, school fees, and opportunity costs. What’s more, you will have gotten it by studying with professors from the world’s best business schools: Wharton, Yale, Stanford, Virginia, Northwestern, etc. You will even be able to say you took a course from a recent Nobel Prize winner, Robert Shiller of Yale, whose course on financial markets this February.

    Now this isn’t going to work at a McKinsey or Bain, but I think it would impress most employers greatly and make a difference in your employment prospects. And if you are able to pull this off you will have learned everything an MBA at Harvard or Chicago will have learned. You won’t have the network or the ideal sequence of learning that is part of a highly organized, lockstep MBA program. But it’s free!

  • JohnAByrne

    Rob,

    See above explanation. Is it official? Not in the sense that you have an actual degree, but no one asks for your degree. You would have to sell this to an employer, but I do think it is an easy sale. And if you claim an MBA on your resume, you would put an asterisk next to it that would refer prospective employers to your one-pager listing all the courses and institutions that offered them.

  • Susan Davis Lmt

    OR they’ll just start charging for the courses, which is more likely the case. I started taking the coursera courses and within 2 terms, they started putting out feelers for paid courses.

  • Alaskan1

    I would love to do something similar for an MFA in creative writing. Several universities offer low-residency creative writing programs that allow students to complete most of their work off-campus, but these programs come at a very high price

  • Aaron

    I am considering this too laurie, would be happy to speak about it with you.

  • Aaron

    aaron at seekingalpha dot com

  • ChronoFish

    At this point there is no “MBA degree”. The point is to get the
    education, not the piece of paper that says you did the work. Clearly
    the actual paper is important for many people. But for those who really
    want the education and not concerned about the paper, this is a great
    way to go. If nothing else, it allows you to experiment and prove to
    yourself that you’re ready without risk.

  • Susan Davis Lmt

    More of a benefit might be if your current employer saw the motivation and discipline you exhibited by completing these courses in this regard and promoted you within in a position that was normally reserved for someone with one of the “Branded” degrees.

  • Ron_Powell

    Let’s keep this simple. No, it would be highly unethical and immoral to claim an MBA after your name if you did not receive such a degree from an accredited institution. This may someday be the case for MOOCs, but it is not now.

    Do not put an MBA after your name. Even with an asterisk, unless you wish to work for a company with a similar disregard for intellectual integrity and honesty.

  • Amar

    This is a great initiative! Is there enough MOOCs to build a DBA out of them?

  • Olabisi Akinkunmi

    I am not clear on this, please, can you explain

  • Olabisi Akinkunmi

    I am interested in an MBA

  • Miqdad

    Is there a way to assess these online courses as an actual official MBA?

  • KevinG

    Laurie, I like what you’re doing and I’m interested from a continuing learning perspective as I already have an MBA. I do disagree that numbers alone will make a free MOOC MBA credible. Look at the University of Phoenix. There are a lot of people getting their MBA through this process, but it simply isn’t regarded the same as a traditional MBA. That’s not to say that there are very smart people out there who have done it and taken a lot away from the process. In the same way, people doing the MOOC route are still going to miss what has always been a big advantage of getting an MBA…the network of people that you develop meaningful relationships from and learn from while attending. You can closely mimic, but you cannot recreate this online…or so I think. What is your take on that so far?

  • Kevin

    …there *aren’t very smart people…

  • postdoc

    How do you get the credits from the MOOC courses? And, which degree-granting institutions will accept these credits?

  • Tim Johnson

    Im interested in doing this. Just starting to gather info. Starting point?

  • postdoc

    Such an important point! When you have collected all of these MOOC hours, which degree-granting institution will issue your degree?

  • JP

    Thank you so much for this post I was considering it and was concerned that the courses wouldn’t be very challenging. But I would have to say my biggest fear is that the market won’t consider this education. I believe the challenge will be to convince potential employers you’ve done what the paying public get’s from traditional programs. This might be challenging however for those organizations that reward out of the box thinking, motivation, and persistence I would say that these types of individuals will be welcome because they did what it takes to get their education and were savvy enough to do it without having to spend money.

    Here’s how I see the future of this, I’ll bet some traditional programs incorporate these programs into their MBA curriculum to replace certain classes they have which will really irritate folks that paid for their education. But what program wouldn’t take advantage of Ivy league courses they can incorporate into their programs for free and charge students for them. I’m not saying this isn’t unethical but it will happen at some point which will justify that MOOCs are a valuable method of education.

  • Alex

    as many MBAs suggest.. the value in an MBA is not just what you learn, but also the people you meet and connections you make. More importantly it is a platform from which major companies recruit. MOCCs are great if you just want to learn, but it will have to be adopted by HR of leading companies to have any real value.

  • Ramon Soto

    What I would like to know is how to get a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science using the MOOC and how? Is it only for MBA?

  • Aunt Mandi

    Anyone got anything on a PMP online?

  • Erin Otten

    This is possible with the MOOC2Degree initiative. Several academic partnerships provide credits after attending their courses, url: http://www.mooc2degree.com/

  • Dawni Phahki Plain Lyngwa

    Hey Laurie, was just reading about you at http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140117183101-17970806-she-s-doing-an-elite-mba-for-under-1-000?trk=tod-home-art-list-large_0 …Impressive… and in fact I’m INSPIRED… I’m planning to go back to school, and I am considering to follow your steps… thanks :)

  • Lynn Greene

    AMEN! Self – Learning is the best skill an employer can look for……

  • Joy

    Very well said! Reading all the comments here and on Linkedin, it all comes down to whether you want the education or the paper.

    Go Laurie! I will follow your steps!

  • Aunt Mandi

    I love it! But it doesn’t really answer the question on how to get the MBA for free. There is, however, a first year 4-course special at Wharton for $49, certificates in. As Laurie Pickard points out, they could disappear, so get them while you can!

  • Maxine T. McClellan

    Jonathan Haber has been extensively blogging about his experience in getting a Bachelors in a year through MOOCs. He has reviewed his experiences with various courses and addresses many issues, concerns and opportunities about MOOCs and also compares it to his getting his bachelor degrees traditionally. His website is: DEGREEOFFREEDOM(dot)org. I would suggest checking it out if you haven’t already. I’m sure it will provide you with some good information and ideas for your MBA blogging initiative.

  • http://bookkeepingcertificationonline.com/ Stephanie Chen

    This is a great resource and one I’ll be coming back to often! Thanks so much for posting!!

  • HolyCra

    that is very big picture!

  • Wondering

    Why do this when you can get a high ranking online accredited MBA from several great programs like Butler and University of South Dakota for $15k?

  • mk

    I’m sorry, but online learning teaches what google could teach you. I have taken online classes and they are a joke and antisocial.

  • Breaking The Chains of Debt

    There will be a huge amount of blowback against this idea from people who currently work for traditional institutions, and other people who have become debt slaves from having taken the traditional route. This is the path to the future of education but it won’t be a smooth road because there are so many vested interests in seeing it NOT happen.

  • Phyllis Gorman

    Ultimately, is there a degree-granting institution? Creating one’s own MBA implies that there is actually a Masters degree to be granted.

  • recentcollegegraduate

    Does anyone know how the MOOCs impacted will be impacted after net neutrality being struck down last week in the FCC v. Verizon court case? Surely it is something to be concerned about looking into the future seeing as it relies on open internet access.

  • po

    What is a free MBA worth if it does not come accredited? Would you hire someone with a non-accredited degree? Does anyone think free courses will aid the bad economy, if employers are looking for those with accredited degrees and experience?

    Sure these classes are great fun for those with a lot of free time on their hands, who want to learn for the sake of learning. Many of the unemployed and underemployed cannot afford college, and these courses give free knowledge. I guess we all will need to learn how to make a viable living, by literally putting our knowledge to good use (work). These courses are gained knowledge without credits. We can all sit in a library and read books by knowledgeable authors who have graduated from top schools and we will be in the same boat as if we take these free on-line courses.

    I am like others, looking for a good paying job with a comfortable wage. Any courses about on the job training? Any courses that don’t require accreditation because the skills you learn are viable for the economy (i.e. factory work, food service, aid work, etc.)?

  • MOOC of Earl

    Looks like many of these courses are abreviated with 3-5 hours a week of work and some are only 5 weeks long. Why do you think that they are not accredited? Maybe because the exams are not proctored nor are they of the same rigor. Or because they are open enrollment. From the start of MOOCs a few years ago, an uncountable number of people have cobled together a series of courses that follow a typical MBA program. What happens when it is an applicant with a series of MOOCs listed up against an applicant with an actual Wharton MBA? These are Continuing Education courses and you will benefit from the knowledge. You join the ranks of millions.

  • MOOC of Earl

    Except these are abreviated courses, and if she fails one or more, she just takes another. The exams aren’t proctored and are mostly multiple choice or single word. Ever wonder why they are not for credit, probably because they are at the level of Continuing Education courses. Even the school that teaches the course won’t except them, so why would an employer.

  • MOOC of Earl

    Seriously? Yes people ask for your degree, they do check with the school, but wait no school awarded her a degree, as they do not accept these classes as being equal to those that they teach in their degree program. She did not receive an MBA. She could list course work as Continuing Ed.

  • MOOC of earl

    There are hundreds of courses in both areas. But a collection of MOOCs does not earn you a degree.

  • John

    But you are not doing a MBA at all. You are merely reading content online. May as well buy a few real books and read them – at least it would be better for your eyes!
    Secondly, you are missing and important aspect of an inClass MBA; namely networking. Meeting people and exchanging ideas are almost more important than being able to ask your lecturer questions. That does not even take into consideration future job opportunities via your connected network.
    Lastly, am guessing that you are doing this for the application of wisdom / filing knowledge / a 1st step in gaining experience, and not just sorting information via data collection. Reasons for doing MBA differs; some do it just to have a paper that says MBA, some do it for genuine interest in the content to further themselves, some do it to get a better job via networking / degree.
    Laura, reading a definition of a word on an online dictionary does not make you a qualified linguist, nor does it give you degree in linguistics.
    A business degree only helps you to get your 1st job, it does not help your career, nor is it a substitute for work experience.
    Am lost at what you are trying to achieve; would you read my blog about how I search the internet and find interesting topics to read for free?

  • Laurie Pickard

    Hi John,

    Thanks for your comments, though I must disagree with most of what you’ve said.

    First, MOOCs are much more involved than reading content. They include videos, graded homework, quizzes, and disucssion forums. Some profs have also started doing live Q&A sessions so that they can respond better to student needs.

    Second, MOOCs do come with student-student interaction and networking possibilities. These possibilities are not yet fully developed, I’ll give you that. But I see plenty of potential in course discussion forums. For example, in one of my current classes, I’ve formed a small study group with 8 other students. We’ll be discussing all the material together, as well as doing a culminating project as a group.

    Third, I agree with you that a degree is useful for getting your first job. You need that piece of paper to even get a foot i nthe door. However, as someone who is well past my first job, I am more interested in moving towards the business end of my current field, rather than starting a whole new career. For people who are not at the beginning of their careers, self-directed study can be a great way of acquiring new skills without sacrificing time on the job, which as you mention is even more important than the degree itself. And I beg to differ with you that this type of professional development doesn’t help my career; to the contrary, I am already applying my new skills on the job, making myself a more valuable employee capable of taking on increased responsibilities.

    As for what I am trying to achieve by publicizing my project, I am primarily interested in bringing attention to the incredible possibilities that MOOCs present. I am not trying to up-end the educational establishment, nor do I claim to be the prophet of an revolution in higher learning. I am simply providing documentation of my own journey and a resource to others who might be interested in using free courses to similar ends.

  • Eriks Goodwin-Pfister

    But will “regular” universities accept the certified completion certificates from someone like EdX as “transferable credits”?

  • Gloria Nkungu

    I am interested in this course of MOOCs MBA.

  • Vinod

    Hi Kevin,

    About network and meaningful relation.
    There are tens of thousand people in Coursera courses from world over. It may become personal it may not but if you contribute on discussion boards….you can have larger network.

  • Vinod

    Online courses are neither joke nor antisocial.
    If you study sincerely, you will get knowledge.

  • Paul Walter

    Laurie, I agree with you 100%. I am taking a few courses in Coursera and I am thoroughly enjoying the learning experience. I may not get credits or credentials validated for these courses but I still get the knowledge. These courses are very interactive if you are willing to put in the extra time and effort by engaging in the online forums, discussion groups etc.. I think this is the way to go and learn if you are a seasoned veteran in any industry and just need to polish up your skills or gain new skills for the next big opportunity. By the way, how many of the people commenting on Laurie’s post have sincerely tried a MOOC? It will be interesting to know that your perspective changes once you attend and complete a MOOC.

  • Jose Poggioli

    Laurie, this is pretty cool that I see your post as I ended up on this page because I saw an article in linkedin talking about you and what you are doing. I have been thinking about MOOC’s for a while and thinking if it is worth it. It seems that in terms of knowledge and experience is totally worth it, although there is always the question about that paper that is very helpful (actual diploma). But with the first in mind this looks like an awesome choice to further my education and choose to learn things that I want to learn I will start taking a look at the options offer and hopefully with time more options will start to be available. .

  • Jake

    This is a great idea for someone who wants to expand their knowledge. At the end of the day, do you want a piece of paper with an MBA on it? Then go get it from any easy state university that you can find, or do you want a kick-ass knowledge from top professors? Most people go to school just to get a piece of paper; how much do you retain or what can you do with the knowledge you received is more valuable. MBA is over rated, most people had it don’t even know what to do with it and end up doing the same thing as before they got their MBA except now they have more student loan to pay for… This is all about knowledge, great idea!!!!

  • John

    Laurie,

    You have not answered my question.

    In fact, you have highlighted your problem again: you are missing the point completely.
    You start with a conclusion and try and justify it using ignorance and obscurantism. You conclusion is that your disagree with objective facts, and then you try and justify this with your own subjective desires using obscure agley examples via illustrations where you are in agreement with me. How absurd.

    You have not highlighted any area where you can offer evidence to support your disagreement. You can not get away from the fact that what you are doing is exactly the same as reading a few books or articles on the internet and claim it to be equivalent to a high profile degree. You are wrong, it is not.
    If you are doing this to further yourself, to acquire new skills, then why boast this using an unrelated steam engine? Why state that you are doing a free MBA when in fact all you are doing is reading free content to further your own limited skills? Many successful people did not attend / finish their education, therefore having an MBA is an irrelevant correlation to success. You clearly used your title of “free MBA” or “She’s Doing An Elite MBA For Under $1,000” for publication to attract an audience. This deceptive and even John A. Byrne (the author of the latter article) deceived us, or your content did. The title and opening of any article is very important. To realize later on that it was a deception, a trick with a different objective and purpose in mind executed by some behemoth flour-flusher is quite degrading.

    I wish you good luck. You are doing a novel thing to further yourself, but please do remember to not use ontological thinking to justify philosophical reasoning via obscurantism and waste people’s time. Logical reasoning based on deduction should be used to derive at explanations – starting with conclusions and then try to justify it with empty claims are meaningless. Try and do a few science, math and logic courses and you would get what it means.

    You could now try and answer my question:
    Am lost at what you are trying to achieve; would you read my blog about
    how I search the internet and find interesting topics to read for free?

    John

  • John

    Yes Paul,

    All you are doing is self-study using free content from the internet. It is great that you and Laurie are doing this. But please, do not masquerade this as a “free” or “cheap” MBA when it is not. In fact, it is not even close to it for the reasons mentioned already:
    1) There is no accreditation, no official MBA degree obtained.
    2) Limited networking, more like a complete lack of
    3) Content is no better than free internet content of books
    4) These courses does not create transferability of credits to any uni or other degree / diploma.
    5) Lack of interaction with a lecturer. A virtual / recorded class is no substitute for a live one.
    6) Real MBA from several great programs starts at $15k, why not just do that and save on all the things you are missing from this free internet MOOC content?
    7) Who is evaluating the exams and home-work? maybe there is no home-work / case studies to do, and the exams are simple multiple-choice. Therefore you do not even know if you have learn something.

    I agree with what another user when he suggested that MOOC is just Continuing Education courses and you will benefit from the knowledge if you want to. You join the ranks of millions, this is not making you special and it is nothing close to what is being advertised here as a “free MBA”.

  • Mike

    I just enrolled in the “all online” MBA program at LSU-Shreveport. I was able to get a waiver on the GMAT as my undergrad GPA was over a 3.2. The classes are compressed into 7 weeks. A $275 a credit or $875 a class it’s very affordable. Ten classes to graduate and it’s a real brick and mortar school. My concentration is in “Contemporary Issues in Accounting and Finance.” After the basic core curriculum and there is a forensic accounting class (thank you Mr. Madoff) and a global securities class.

  • Dan Powers

    huge even :)

  • Rick,

    Laurie,

    I applaud you for your efforts to improve the quality of lives world-wide by promoting the free, quality education available via MOOCs, Also, I think it is AWESOME that these top schools and their professors are taking initiative with mass education.

    I believe your critics are missing the point. The point is to do what you love; what you are called to do. What YOU are doing is combining your inherent passion with business knowledge, through MBA coursework, to be more effective and to better serve your stakeholders. You, like many others, do not need a fancy “foot-in-the-door” resume and connections through your intramural team to get the job you desire. However, the education you are obtaining WILL help you reach your goals in sustainable supply chain and fair trade.

    Some* of the pedigree-seeking MBA’s have become so obsessed with wealth, power, competition, and self-righteousness that they cannot see the value of what you are doing and how it’s serving the world (and yourself) far more than a Wall Street Job, a Porsche, and a vacation home will ever accomplish. While they are shoveling shit to climb the ladder after paying A LOT for a piece of paper, you will be advancing yourself and your projects while viewing it all as an adventure, with a genuine smile on your face. THAT is something millions of rat-racers envy, whether they admit it or not.

    *I know there are MBA students and alumni who have good-intentions, desire to learn, and have also found their calling, but some people leave me concerned with their false leadership. Speaking of which…

    John, do you really have nothing better to do than shoot at Laurie with negativity and insults? Fancy words though! You do a great job of sounding important. Is that another example of something learned exclusively in business school?

    Best of luck and send me some coffee! :)

  • Suman Faulkner

    Hi Laura, I just signed in for Finance class, and I totally agree with you to take the actual step into this, and hopefully these courses will add up to something. Its free, and if we have time, and interest even in expanding our knowledge even if it did not take us to a MBA, then take it. Its free education/knowledge for anyone to add to your portfolio if you are already in the business world.

  • tigerChaCha

    Its like sputnik

  • Miguel Suarez

    An extract from a post in The Operations Room by Jan Van Mieghem.

    When it comes to education, though, we must distinguish between learning and signalling…

    Admittedly, this distinction pertains mostly to top or “brand” schools, whose value proposition of the degree is signaling selectivity—that will not change by MOOCs or any online learning. The desire to signal uniqueness and distinction is so human it is timeless. Add to that the desire to be surrounded by similar people or those one looks up to, and the opportunity to build lifelong relationships and networks, and to belong (to the club)…

  • voltaire

    Hi Laurie…you’re such an inspiration! Because of that, I’ve enrolled to one of the MOOC free courses. Thank you!

  • April

    Genius, and something I’ve been wanting to do for a while. Can you give any guidance on how to create your own MBA curriculum? (e.g. which courses to choose)

  • Ivan

    Hello everybody, the topic is very interesting. I have a question for you all: what is the difference between a “Statement of Accomplishment” and a “Verified Certificate”? Is it worth it to pay 50$ to get a Verified Certificate? Thanks and good luck to you all.

  • Tom Weatherly

    John, pretty sure you haven’t taken a MOOC based on your remarks, at least not one from a top university. They are pretty involved, would disprove your claim in 2, 3, 5, and 7, and you can go as deep as you desire with networking. The Darden courses go deep, and one even included peer review of business projects. Laurie notes many times that this is not a paper chase by choice. I can see where the application of knowledge is the basis of her decision, and her online presence may arguably end up more valuable to the work of business in a practical sense than a conferred degree. The basis of most paper credentials is that credible witnesses can testify to the authenticity of your claim. That’s true for weddings, births, and funerals, too. Lack of paper doesn’t invalidate your claim, just makes it more complicated to provide evidence. I predict Laurie will succeed in providing credible evidence of her capability that will far exceed a $15K diploma.

  • Ieshia Wright

    Laurie please send the link to your website. I am in definite need of the MOOCs! My email is ieshiamariewright@gmail.com. Thanks in advance!

  • Benjamin Taber

    Fascinated by this, please share more sites for MBA certification Education/teach

  • Matt Bartel

    Here you go Kashif. Below is an open forum for ECON 252 (Financial Markets) I used this as a primary resource for a course I was taking at another university.

    http://oyc.yale.edu/economics/econ-252-11/lecture-4

    Howard/Laurie – Any MBA program is unlikely to offer accreditation (as it is against their own interest). However, I’d place my bets on third party certification testing coming soon. If your overall goal is having an AACSB accredited MBA this may not be the ideal route but if you are completing quality courses on MBA level business topics, you can’t lose as you are receiving a free education. In light of going to one of the tier 1 MBA programs, If you have it in you to self manage your education, I’d say MOOC is the sound investment.

  • http://chefboyrdeuce.com/ Deuce Cartier

    I’ve mentioned it on my blog, and will probably continue to do so because the more courses I’ve taken, the more I see this as a revolutionary concept.

  • Malcolm Heard

    I am confused. Let us be honest the reason why people choose UPENN over say SDSU is because of the name. Many employers want to see transcripts. I doubt giving an employer ten printed certificates will be taken seriously.

  • Paul Walter

    John,
    I never said that I was doing a free MBA at all. I do not believe that by doing MOOC courses online will equate to a fully accredited MBA. My interests are different. For example, I am relearning Electrical Analysis, Control Systems and Robotics. Subjects that I studied in undergrad engineering courses 20 years ago are now taught with a complete different perspective and they are invaluable to me. That’s all.

    Just because I took these courses doesn’t mean that I am claiming credits from any institution. I am learning to enrich myself and to use this new knowledge in my day to day job!!
    That’s all.

  • Sue

    I personally don’t think MOOC’s will replace an accredited MBA, Simply because you are PAYING to get the piece of paper. For example, someone can sit in on as many undergraduate courses as they would like, without being registered in the courses, this is equivalent to an old-world (pre internet) approach to free knowledge. However, for your knowledge to be verified, authenticated and validated you have to register and PAY to get the piece of paper (undergrad). Although knowledge is free, academics are a business, period. You need to pay to get certifications.

  • John

    Paul,

    Your post is either a deliberate deception or based on ignorance.
    You wrote that you agreed 100% with Laurie. That implies that you also “claim” that doing MOOC’s is equivalent to a “free elite MBA”.
    But your above post to me you are clearly contradicting that by agreeing with me that:
    1) MOOC is just Continuing Education courses and you will benefit from the
    knowledge if you want to. You join the ranks of millions, this is not
    making you special and it is nothing close to what is being advertised
    here as a “free elite MBA”.
    2) You are merely reading content online. May as well buy a few real books
    and read them – at least it would be better for your eyes!

    Have your cake and eat it? I think not.

    That’s all.

  • John

    Proof by assertion is a logical fallacy.
    Why do you disagree with:

    P1) MOOC is just Continuing Education courses and you will benefit from the knowledge if you want to. You join the ranks of millions, this is not making you special and it is nothing close to what is being advertised here as a “free elite MBA”.
    P2) You are merely reading content online. May as well buy a few real books and read them – at least it would be better for your eyes!
    C1) Therefore MOOC is not a “free elite MBA”

    Your move.

  • John

    This is very misleading.
    Doing a few courses online is not the same as a “free elite MBA”.

  • Paul Chintapalli

    Which university will finally issue MOOC MBA degree?

  • Geoff Kirwan

    Spherical, but quite pointy in parts.

  • Susan J

    Laurie,

    I’m so glad to see another person going for their self-study MBA. I may join a top tier program (if I can get in) for the networking potential, but I’ve been studying for a year now on a self-designed part-time program and it’s been fantastic. Good luck!

    Susan

  • John

    Rick,

    Your content went down the drain when you used the words “I believe your critics….”. Am sure you know that believing something means holding content as true in spite of knowing if there is evidence or not. However, you do seem to KNOW a lot about what Lauri and what she is doing.

    I am stating that Laurie is falsely advertising a free elite MBA. You have not given any evidence to counter this. In fact, you have failed at the logic bit. As mentioned before, it is great what Laurie is doing to further herself, but I question the medium and the false branding.

    Lastly, your last paragraph dedicated to me is a solid ad hominem. You have to be a philosopher to deny that.

    Best of luck and please review logic 101.

  • John

    How ironic.
    Here you admit to losing both the network and the stamp of approval. But when you replied to me you rejected this.

    Laurie, please stop adverting reading internet content results in a free elite MBA.

  • JohnAByrne

    No one is falsely advertising an MBA. What we have said from the start is that there are now enough MOOC courses in business available to “effectively” get an MBA education for free. No one is going to grant you an MBA diploma by taking these courses, and if they would, you shouldn’t want it. But you will have a complete MBA education if you complete a portfolio of core and elective courses via MOOCs. And that would give you the license to tell a potential employer that you have taken enough business courses from elite schools to have earned an MBA.

  • laura bahena,

    Where do I enroll for classes? Please share laura bahena,CCHW Independent Consultant

  • laura bahena,

    I see some names of platforms listed on the article of which I will enter to see how they are teaching.

  • http://www.mybloglog.com/buzz/members/gardenwildrose/ GardenWildRose

    Where do we apply for the free program? I am into computers big time. I am basically self taught… created a server; host my personal sites on it.Create graphics; animations, and write poetry. I also blog on many social sites, have a fair amount of follwers.

  • John

    Oh Rick,

    “Piss off!” Hu?
    Socrates wrote ‘When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser.’ I am honoured that you show your support for this philosophical quote! You must not be a philosopher because you never denied your personal attack on me.

    The evidence:

    1) Laurie’s website: www [dot] nopaymba [dot] com. and her repeated responses here defending it mentioning words such as “No-Pay MBA”.
    2) JohnAByrne LinkedIn article topic “She’s Doing An Elite MBA For Under $1,000” and his opening paragraph “will earn her MBA in three years for less than $1,000”
    3) This article topic: “The MOOC Revolution: How To Earn An Elite MBA For Free” and “So you want an MBA?…..And it won’t cost you a cent!”
    4) Your denial as evident in your post content.
    5) Your refusal to provide any evidence that Laurie and JohnAByrne is not falsely advertising a free elite MBA.
    6) The unsolicited moderation of JohnAByrne (mod) of my post response to him. I highlighting where he and Laurie make these claims and JohnAByrne refuse to approve my post. User ‘MOOC of Earl’ makes sense and I agree with him, yet JohnAByrne refuses to address this or ‘MOOC of Earl’ points.

    Your response line (referecned below) is a straw man, red herring and ad himinem; all in one go. I am impressed, your are a master at informal logical fallacies!
    “As I suspected, you clearly have nothing better to do than rain on the parades of others. No, I don’t literally mean rain.”

    The rest of your post is grounded, actually anchored, in figurative speech metaphorical assertion fallacies.

    Well done.

  • John

    If no one is advertising a free elite MBA, why did you write an aticle titled “She’s Doing An Elite MBA For Under
    $1,000” and an opening paragraph “will earn her MBA in three years for
    less than $1,000”?
    Why would Laurie’s website read: www [dot] nopaymba [dot] com. and she posts repeated
    responses here defending it mentioning words such as “No-Pay MBA”?
    Why are you refusing to show my posts that I respond to you? Are you trying to deny objective facts by silencing my content?

  • Danny Mothilall

    This is the very first time that such a ‘Never -to-be-repeated ‘ opportunity ever came my way and being a South African it is really exciting. Danny Mothilall email dannymoth@gmail.com

  • Danny Mothilall

    Yes Indeed Me -Danny Mothilall

  • Stephanie

    Hi Laurie, I have personally
    struggled to find a Graduate program that I think will give me the edge (to
    justify the investment), and so far have not been successful; it’s much harder
    as well when it seems everyone has a graduate degree, but again – how does this
    give me the edge and set me apart from everyone else? Instead of going into
    serious debt I have deferred for now am looking for skill strengthening via sites like coursera and udacity and I’ll tell you, the self – discipline required is monumental
    so good for you! I think there are real benefits to structuring the program
    around MOOC’s as you can cherry pick courses to help strengthen skills or
    knowledge to compliment previous experience. I suspect though that since University’s are charging already for traditional classes they are able to put these out for free as there is probably little additional effort to do so; however as the demand for this increases, so will the demand for accreditation, and so will the cost – but I can’t imagine it will be anything like what it costs now.

  • http://FreedomFiles.Info/ FactsNotFallacies

    Mind fucking blown.

    The English language is too deficient to allow me to effectively express how profound of a read this was.

    Let the academic oligarchy implode once and for all!

  • http://FreedomFiles.Info/ FactsNotFallacies

    If all they care about is how effective the person will be on the job (which any smart employer would do) then yes, they can be taken seriously.

  • John

    See to me that you have followed your own advice to pissed off.
    Did you join the zoo?

  • Doug Provins

    It’s a virtual planetoid! It’s got it’s own solar system!

  • MBA

    I would add “Model Thinking” which was from University of Michigan on Coursera to the MBA list, and the Stanford version of Game Theory.

  • MatteaSimone

    How can you be notified when these classes will be available again? I’d like to pursue the in Fall 2014 or Spring 205. Thanks!

  • Rafael Sanchez

    You are all funny.
    Elite MBA? How can anyone miss the point that is being made?
    This is not an elite MBA but a way to access the same information that you get IN an elite MBA. I have one of those “Elite MBA’s” and I needed it where I started working years ago and now to teach but MOOC’S offer the same information that you get in school and if you do the work it can be tough.
    I also have a JD and my Duke university MOOC on International Human Rights is as tough as any law school class I ever took.
    Surely the smart people on this board cannot be fighting over a concept can they?

  • Jon Overstreet

    I am considering LSU-S Mike, how do you like it?

  • Sagar Tandon

    Ahaa @laurie_pickard:disqus can u suggest me from where to start and what are the courses you are doing. I need suggestions, I need to complete whole MBA in next 1 year and more than that I am interested in business innovations, design thinking and sustainability also. If you are in touch with these type of MOOCs then please drop me a message on rssbsagartan@gmail.com . Thanks :)

  • Laurie Pickard

    Hi Sagar,
    I’m happy to share suggestions on using MOOCs for MBA learning – in fact, I’ve devoted an entire website to the subject! Check out NoPayMBA.com, and if you still have questions, I’d be happy to answer them.

  • John Deighton

    Laurie, what is your blog address, would be interested to follow your MOOC MBA progress…. you post some worthy comments below…

  • John Deighton

    Hi Laurie, what is your blog address for your MOOC, MBA progress? curious to follow your efforts… it’s all about credibility as blogging about your chosen MOOC’s may just deliver that, well done.

  • Courtney Elliott

    No Sister you are not the only one! The journey has begun for me as well. And I am LOVING IT!!!!!!!

  • Courtney Elliott

    I’m also taking this route, and loving every minute of it!!!!!!!!!

  • http://www.nopaymba.com Laurie Pickard

    That’s great! I am actually beginning to put together a group of people taking business MOOCs to track our learning together. Let me know if you’d be interested.

  • John

    You are struggling to express this via language because you are missing the point – you are being fooled by the conman (article author).

    Btw, you do realize that if the academic oligarchy implode then so will these MOOC’s. That ironically makes for an implosion of knowledge in general. No wonder you can not express your opinion via what you call a deficient English language. Oh, the irony.

  • John

    What is the relevance to your “being a South African” ?

  • http://FreedomFiles.Info/ FactsNotFallacies

    “Btw, you do realize that if the academic oligarchy implode then so will these MOOC’s.”

    Nope. As sites like Udacity have demonstrated, MOOC’s do not need to rely on existing universities to be of use to people in the job market.

    Something about your comment tells me you’ve wasted your time on a degree that you are now trying to justify as worthwhile.

  • Lalitha Bashyam Krishna

    As a woman from India where woman is not allowed to complete her higher studies as per her choice, I wish to take an International Executive MBA from my home country without having to spend money since it is not affordable. for me. Therefore I request to know more about the various options available for getting an International MBA to upgrade my knowledge and career.

  • http://FreedomFiles.Info/ FactsNotFallacies

    MOOCs need not depend on present academia. As sites like Udacity have rightfully demonstrated.

    Someone with a small imagination like yours would no doubt have trouble understanding why there is nothing present day universities do that can’t be achieved through more efficient means.

    This is the 21st century.

  • Mike

    it’s something for employers to look at on your resume that shows you still have an interest for learning; while learning new information and gaining knowledge. an MBA is only a title; it’s the thought that counts

  • John

    You do realise that MOOC courses are on university-level subject matter from university faculty.
    Udacity does not offer anything new of different than most other universities. In fact, Udacity only remove the social and real world interaction with teachers and fellow students and then charge for it – Udacity is selling what it calls a “course experience” version of all classes @~$150/month. Therefore Udacity does not provide free MOOCs at all, nor do they allow their MOOC’s to be freely distributed for re-useit, they merely provide a a platform and charge for it. The history of MOOCs far pre-dates the Udacity, edX and Coursera platforms. These 3 companies has to work hard to attract students and Coursera and edX charges money for certificates for their courses (like universities). Udacity ONLY has 38 active courses in its catalog, pontificating Udacity is better than universities is living in denialism mars. And the irnony is that university visiting teachers and a few industry people (that are university educated) work with Udacity to create the MOOC content! The courses are mostly “freshman year” courses, and very few, if any post grad or 3rd year courses.

    MOOC.s are dependent on present academics and on platform provides are after YOUR money as Udacity and the likes have demonstrated.

    I think the conman has sold to the fool in this 21st century. Which one is you?

  • John

    Are you selling Udacity?
    Udacity has demonstrated that they can provide a platform to offer some free and paid courses. Courses are developed by university teachers or university educated trainers.

    Something about your comments tells me that you are offering an ad hominem to try and justify not countering my previous post content. I really hope this is not what you got from a MOOC!!

  • http://FreedomFiles.Info/ FactsNotFallacies

    I sure *wish* I could get paid to point out the obvious. :-)

    “Courses are developed by university teachers or university educated trainers.”

    Even if that were 100% accurate, it’s circular reasoning to claim that they cannot perform the same functions independent of universities.

    I did counter your previous comment. You have relied exclusively on circular reasoning to claim that no post-secondary training can possibly exist without the bloated higher-ed system we have now.

  • John

    “Even if that were 100% accurate, it’s circular reasoning to claim that
    they cannot perform the same functions independent of universities.”

    You were the one claiming that they do already when you wrote =
    “As sites like Udacity have demonstrated, MOOC’s do not need to rely on existing universities to be of use to people in the job market.” =

    Therefore, you have the burden of proof/evidence. You must be new to critical thinking because your post is full of dichotomies and informal logical fallacies. You are the one that needs to demonstrate/argue that your Udacity or any other MOOC based platform “… need not depend on present academia” because it is YOUR CLAIM.

    Your last comment is littered with an assertion fallacy. Repeating it is not living up to your burden of proof, it is highlighting your ignoramus.

    My prediction would be that you must have taken one of these “primitive freshman” university developed paid uncredited MOOC courses because you are clearly rejecting logic in favor of your false beliefs.

    You do realize that MOOC courses are on entry level university-level subject matters from university faculties. Or suppose to be, right?
    Udacity does not offer anything new of different than most other universities. In fact, Udacity only remove the social real world interaction with teachers & fellow students and then charge for it – Udacity is selling what it calls a “course experience” version of all classes @~$150/month. Therefore Udacity does not provide free MOOCs at all, nor do they allow their MOOC’s to be freely distributed for re-useit, they merely provide a a platform and charge for it. The history of MOOCs far pre-dates the Udacity, edX and Coursera platforms. These 3 companies has to work hard to attract students and Coursera and edX charges money for certificates for their courses (like universities). Udacity ONLY has 38 active courses in its catalog – so pontificating that Udacity is better than universities is living in denialism cookoo land. And the irony is that visiting university teachers and a some industry people (that are university educated) work with Udacity to create the MOOC content! The courses are mostly “freshman year” courses, and very few, if any post grad or 3rd year courses.

    MOOC’s are dependent on present academics and on platform provides that are after YOUR money – Udacity and the likes have demonstrated this clearly.

    I think the conman has sold poo to the fool in this 21st century masquerading it a new and shiny gold. Which one is you – conman or fool? So far all you provided was FallaciesNotFacts. You can your handle mixed up due to a broken reason filter that lets the rubbish get through. You probably adopted your reason filter and you or the adopted filter has been install for so long you do not even realize it is broken. That is ok, but it should give you an agtung pause if you are serious about the foundations of your false beliefs.

  • John

    If no one is advertising a free elite MBA, why did you write an aticle titled “She’s Doing An Elite MBA For Under
    $1,000” and an opening paragraph “will earn her MBA in three years for
    less than $1,000”?
    Why would Laurie’s website read: www [dot] nopaymba [dot] com. and she posts repeated
    responses here defending it mentioning words such as “No-Pay MBA”?
    Why are you refusing to show my posts that I respond to you? Are you trying to deny objective facts by silencing my content?

  • John

    “Even if that were 100% accurate, it’s circular reasoning to claim that
    they cannot perform the same functions independent of universities.”

    You were the one claiming that they do already when you wrote =
    “As sites like Udacity have demonstrated, MOOC’s do not need to rely on existing universities to be of use to people in the job market.” =

    Therefore, you have the burden of proof/evidence. You must be new to critical thinking because your post is full of dichotomies and informal logical fallacies. You are the one that needs to demonstrate/argue that your Udacity or any other MOOC based platform “… need not depend on present academia” because it is YOUR CLAIM.

    Your last comment is littered with an assertion fallacy. Repeating it is not living up to your burden of proof, it is highlighting your ignoramus.

    My prediction would be that you must have taken one of these “primitive freshman” university developed paid uncredited MOOC courses because you are clearly rejecting logic in favor of your false beliefs.

    You do realize that MOOC courses are on entry level university-level subject matters from university faculties. Or suppose to be, right?
    Udacity does not offer anything new of different than most other universities.
    In fact, Udacity only remove the social real world interaction with
    teachers & fellow students and then charge for it – Udacity is
    selling what it calls a “course experience” version of all classes
    @~$150/month. Therefore Udacity does not provide free MOOCs at all, nor do they allow their MOOC’s to be freely distributed for re-useit, they merely provide a a platform and charge for it. The history of MOOCs far pre-dates the Udacity, edX and Coursera platforms. These 3 companies has to work hard to attract students and Coursera and edX charges money for certificates for their courses (like universities). Udacity ONLY has 38 active courses in its catalog – so pontificating that Udacity is better than universities is living in denialism cookoo land. And the irony is that visiting university teachers and a some industry people (that are university educated) work with Udacity to create the MOOC content! The courses are mostly “freshman year” courses, and very few, if any post grad or 3rd year courses.

    MOOC’s are dependent on present academics and on platform provides that are after YOUR money – Udacity and the likes have demonstrated this clearly.

    I think the conman has sold poo to the fool in this 21st century masquerading it a new and shiny gold. Which one is you – conman or fool? So far all you provided was FallaciesNotFacts. You can your handle mixed up due to a broken reason filter that lets the rubbish get through. You probably adopted your reason filter and you or the adopted filter has been install for so long you do not even realize it is broken. That is ok, but it should give you an agtung pause if you are serious about the foundations of your false beliefs.

    Want another go?

  • http://FreedomFiles.Info/ FactsNotFallacies

    “You were the one claiming that they do already when you wrote…”

    Which Udacity does demonstrate. There’s nothing they do that either isn’t or can’t be done independently from traditional universities.

    “You must be new to critical thinking because your post is full of dichotomies and informal logical fallacies.”

    Such as?

    “You are the one that needs to demonstrate/argue that your Udacity or any other MOOC based platform “… need not depend on present academia” because it is YOUR CLAIM.”

    And it’s YOUR claim that colleges are entirely necessary to do everything they are doing. All you have you do is give an example of a service they currently provide that would collapse in the absence of university influence.

    “Your last comment is littered with an assertion fallacy. Repeating it is not living up to your burden of proof, it is highlighting your ignoramus.”

    And that comment is entirely a straw man laced with an ad hominem. Engaging in that is not making you any more persuasive. Name one thing Udacity does that MUST depend on a university institution in some way. So far all their Nano degrees will capable of being done without them so I don’t see why anyone should assume universities are critical to make a MOOC work.

    “My prediction would be that you must have taken one of these “primitive freshman” university developed paid uncredited MOOC courses because you are clearly rejecting logic in favor of your false beliefs.”

    Well you’ve predicted wrong. Currently I have gone for my Comptia A+, Network+, Security+, and GSEC certifications. All taken without the need for any traditional institution of higher education.

    So yes, with my positive experience with those I am a little biased towards the idea that college is the *ONLY* way to train students for practical skills after they’ve completed high school. MOOCs are no different, the upcoming Nanodegrees are direct evidence of this.

    “You do realize that MOOC courses are on entry level university-level subject matters from university faculties. Or suppose to be, right?”

    Not anymore. I’ll mention the Nanodegrees as much as necessary to drive this point home.

    In fact, that’s the only example I need to rebut what you said in the rest of that paragraph.

    “MOOC’s are dependent on present academics and on platform provides that are after YOUR money – Udacity and the likes have demonstrated this clearly.”

    Get with the times man. From the recent NYT piece on Nanodegrees:

  • John

    —“Which Udacity does demonstrate. There’s nothing they do that either
    isn’t or can’t be done independently from traditional universities.”—–

    Repeating your assertion fallacy with circular reasoning is merely begging the question.
    You need to back up your claim that Udacity MOOC’s do not need to rely on existing universities. That would be hard for you since Udacity was founded by the Stanford professor and former Google engineering whiz Sebastian Thrun. But please keep on digging your hole deeper. It is your hole, a whole round one it seems.

    You wrote:
    —- “And it’s YOUR claim that colleges are entirely necessary to do everything they are doing.” —–

    I find it incredible when people claim to know my beliefs without me stating it. How do you do this? Trying to shift the burden using ropes made of assertion fallacies pained in false beliefs must be stifling for you. How do you do it is beyond me!

    ——-“All you have you do is give an example of a service they currently
    provide that would collapse in the absence of university influence.” —

    But I have, you chose to ignore it. Besides, it is not my claim, but yours, even-though I have shown that your absurd claim is grounded in wishful thinking already. You missed it, and still do. Oh, the irony!

    —–“Name one thing Udacity does that MUST depend on a university institution in some way.” —–

    Sure, easy: The university model that you so despise. But wait, here is more and some I already mentioned:
    -Its founder’s university level education.
    -Money (operational costs), not all of Udacity’s MOOC’s or platforms are free.
    -University educated teachers and university educated industry trainers for setting up & building the courses.
    -Students have no real life interaction with other students or the lecturer.
    -No real industry accepted accreditation. Even Nanodegrees are done WITH OTHER COMPANIES.
    -The courses itself needs to be comparative (in name and content and lecturer proficiency) to university courses or else they are useless.
    -Want more? Ironically you can not even live up to the burden of your claim, yet it is easy for me to show your claim patently absurdly easily ridiculously false. And you do not even get it!

    Companies like Udacity is just there to ride the wave of money in education.

    —-“So yes, with my positive experience with those I am a little biased
    towards the idea that college is the *ONLY* way to train students for
    practical skills after they’ve completed high school. MOOCs are no
    different, the upcoming Nanodegrees are direct evidence of this.”—-

    Changing your tune now? Interesting dichotomy or is that a full cognitive dissonance?
    Now that you can not live up to your burden of evidence you are confusing information with evidence. Udacity’s Nanodegrees is evidence that it needs universities and their accreditation. Something that you claim is not needed. Please stop rejecting logic in favor of your absurd false beliefs.

    —–“Not anymore. I’ll mention the Nanodegrees as much as necessary to drive this point home”——

    Claims Claims. More claims from you with no substance. Are you for real?

    The only thing that your NYT piece says is that you are wrong. It says clearly “it’s like a university”, but you deny this by claiming “… need not depend on present academia”.

    Your own evidence that you think supports your claim is actually saying exactly the opposite.

    Please start evidencing your claims or I stop replying. Your choice.

  • John

    Why would a Philosorcerer acknowledge anything outside the all encompassing Philononsense is astonishing. If that point is wrong then it renders itself accurate.

    Welcome to the real world.

  • John

    MOOCs are really freshman entry level courses.
    MOOCs remove the social real world interaction with teachers & fellow students and then charge for it if you want it.
    There are very few MOOC courses available – you need to assemble them self to make up a full 3 year course.
    You do not get any accreditation, no degree, so who will acknowledge you so called studies?
    There is hardly any homework for MOOC courses.
    There is hardly any exams for MOOC courses – multiple choice comes to mind and take it as often as you like till it says pass. Oh dear.

    You mas as well buy a had copy book on the subject you are interested in and then read the book. MOOC differs in that – In stead of you reading the book, MOOC presents a person on a video reading it for you. This is nothing new, no need to get all excited. It’s for the lazy person, and it’s an opportunity for companies to make money off the lazy person. The irony is that the lazy person needs to find the appropriate MOOC course and then also convince industry that says MOOCs courses are worth anything and that it was really completed. Seems like the only good that comes form MOOC is that is makes the lazy person work, and makes money for the company that hosts the MOOC platform.

    This ludicrousness is ridiculous.

  • Hemant Sibal

    I’d be interested in joining a forum and I have been tinkering with this idea for a while now.

  • Agnes Nestpasuneidiote

    It is awesome, and huh… It seems like the best thing after the sliced bread BUT did it seriously take that long for people in the US to realize that education should NOT be a business but a RIGHT? While Chancellors at University of California keep on pocketing bigger and bigger salaries ( $400 000 plus a huge package) that are even above what makes the governor himself, and while academic level are plummeting and tuition fees are skyrocketing, free education is the norm in many civilized countries ( Sweden, France, Germany, Finland etc) Even private schools’ tuition fees there, are way more affordable than a community college in the US!
    For example a neurosurgeon can graduate in France for $0 in debt ( Med students get even paid at one point of their studies…)
    I find sad that students have to struggle that way. Very sad indeed.

  • Yami

    Research CLEPS and DSST that accepted as earned credit at certain Universities. Several moocs you will see are recommended for these CLEPS and DSSTs as preparatory courses.

  • suhani

    Please anyone can help me regarding the procedure of this online MBA

  • Erik

    Hi,

    I find your website really informative and appreciate the work you are doing.
    I’ve finished a Bachelor, have some years work experience and interested in doing a Master degree with MOOC courses.

    Unfortunately, I still don’t get the full picture and I’m hoping you can help me to get it clarified.

    Imagine, if I’ve decided which MOOC courses to take and doing successful. The question, I have is. How and from where I will get on the end of all completed MOOC courses my Master degree, from which University?

    I hope you can helm with it and clarify it.

    Thank you for help and feedback.

    Regards,
    Erik

  • Michaelo Dally

    Hi. I notice that the courses offered do not date to 2015.
    Is there an update, please?
    Thank you.
    Michael Dally

  • Jeff Schmitt

    Hello, Michaelo. Thanks for writing. We publish a monthly update on MOOCs for our readers. Here is our latest covering MOOC courses being launched in June. http://poetsandquants.com/2015/05/26/essential-mooc-courses-in-business-for-june/ Best, Jeff

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