Yale | Mr. Tambourine Man
GMAT 740, GPA 3.3
Wharton | Mr. Sales From Law School
GMAT 700, GPA 11/20
Wharton | Mr. Rural Ed To International Business
GRE 329, GPA 3.6
McCombs School of Business | Mr. CRE
GMAT 625, GPA 3.4
IU Kelley | Mr. Jiu-Jitsu Account Admin
GMAT 500, GPA 3.23
Berkeley Haas | Mr. LGBT+CPG
GMAT 720, GPA 3.95
Kellogg | Mr. Community Involvement
GMAT 600, GPA 3.2
Harvard | Mr. Air Force Seeking Feedback
GRE 329, GPA 3.2
Columbia | Mr. URM Artillery Officer
GRE 317, GPA 3.65
Kellogg | Mr. Engineer To PM
GMAT 710, GPA 4.0 (with Honors)
Harvard | Ms. Eternal Optimism
GMAT 720, GPA 4.0 (First Class Honours)
Harvard | Mr. Captain Mishra
GMAT 760, GPA 4.0
Stanford GSB | Ms. Lady Programmer
GRE 331, GPA 2.9
Ross | Mr. Double Eagle
GMAT 740, GPA 3.77
Stanford GSB | Ms. Eyebrows Say It All
GRE 299, GPA 8.2/10
Harvard | Mr. UHNW Family Office
GMAT 730, GPA 4.0
Harvard | Mr. Certain Government Guy
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
Stanford GSB | Mr. Hopeful B School Investment Analyst
GRE 334, GPA 4.0
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Stuck Consultant
GMAT 760, GPA 3.6
MIT Sloan | Mr. Mechanical Engineer W/ CFA Level 2
GMAT 760, GPA 3.83/4.0 WES Conversion
Wharton | Mr. Asset Manager – Research Associate
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
Chicago Booth | Mr. International Banker
GMAT 700, GPA 3.4
MIT Sloan | Mr. South East Asian Product Manager
GMAT 720, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Ms. Hollywood To Healthcare
GMAT 730, GPA 2.5
Stanford GSB | Ms. Investor To Fintech
GMAT 750, GPA 3.8
Kellogg | Mr. Structural Engineer
GMAT 680, GPA 3.2
Darden | Mr. Anxious One
GRE 323, GPA 3.85

Wharton MBA Defends Romney & Private Equity

Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s career in private equity is not much different than legendary investor Warren Buffett, according to first-year Wharton MBA student Daniel Pang.

“What Mitt Romney and many private equity firms do … is not different from what Warren Buffett does,” Pang told The Daily Pennsylvanian. “It’s pretty much just investing in companies.”

Romney has been the subject of withering criticism over his role as head of the private equity firm Bain Capital for many years. The candidate, said Pang, “might be really wealthy, but he’s made exponentially more money for other people.”

“Sometimes, for a company to operate most efficiently … it’s not the worst thing if some people ended up losing their jobs,” said Pang, co-chair of a leverage buyout conference at Wharton. “A lot of times, that’s very beneficial for companies.”

Private equity is an increasingly popular career option for Wharton MBA students. In 2001, 2.3% of MBA students accepted full-time job offers with companies in the industries of private equity or venture capital, according to that year’s MBA Career Report. By last year, some 7.65% of the Class of 2011 landed jobs in those two fields.