NYU Stern | Ms. Indian PC
GRE 328, GPA 3.2
Kellogg | Mr. Another Strategy Consultant
GMAT 720, GPA 5.5/10
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Renewable Energy Sales Manager
GMAT 700, GPA 3.9
Darden | Ms. Structural Design Engineer
GMAT 750, GPA 3.6
Stanford GSB | Mr. Aspiring Unicorn Founder
GMAT Haven't taken, GPA 3.64
Stanford GSB | Mr. Resume & MBA/MS Program Guidance
GMAT 650, GPA 2.75
Columbia | Mr. Pharmacy District Manager
GMAT 610, GPA 3.2
Wharton | Mr. Indian Financial Engineer
GMAT 750, GPA 4.0
Stanford GSB | Mr. Mobility Nut
GMAT 740, GPA 3.8
UCLA Anderson | Mr. The Average Indian
GMAT 680, GPA 3.7
Tuck | Mr. Alpinist
GRE 324, GPA 3.6
Ross | Mr. Military To Corporate
GRE 326, GPA 7.47/10
Harvard | Mr. Tourist Development Of India
GMAT 680, GPA 3
Harvard | Mr. Strategy Consultant Middle East
GMAT 760, GPA 3.4
Harvard | Mr Big 4 To IB
GRE 317, GPA 4.04/5.00
Harvard | Mr. Double Bachelor’s Investment Banker
GMAT 780, GPA 3.9
Wharton | Mr. Non-Profit Researcher
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Mr. French In Japan
GMAT 720, GPA 14,3/20 (French Scale), Top 10%
Harvard | Mr. Aspiring Human
GMAT Not yet given but sample test shows 700, GPA 7 out of 7
Kellogg | Ms. Chicago Lawyer
GRE 330, GPA 2.3
Chicago Booth | Mr. Peru PE To Brazil MBB
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7
MIT Sloan | Mr. Fighter Pilot
GMAT 730, GPA 3.0
Chicago Booth | Mr. Central American FP&A
GRE 140, GPA 3.0
Columbia | Ms. New York
GMAT 710, GPA 3.25
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Skin Care Engineer
GMAT Expected 730, GPA 7.03/10
MIT Sloan | Ms. FAANG Software Engineer
GMAT 680, GPA 3.8
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Impact Maker
GMAT 690, GPA 3.7

Payback On An MBA: $55K To $47K Bump

Source: Bloomberg Business

Source: Bloomberg Business

How much is an MBA degree worth?

The latest data from Bloomberg’s survey of 6,400 second-year MBAs who gained jobs by April 2014 shows it’s worth quite a bit–even more so for job switchers.

MBA grads who used the degree to switch careers generally saw bigger pay increases over their pre-MBA compensation than those who built on their earlier work experience and stayed in the same industry.

AN 85% INCREASE IN PAY OVER PRE-MBA LEVELS FOR CAREER SWITCHERS

For the MBAs who ventured into new fields, the median pay increase was a whopping $55,000 toward a salary of $120,000. That translates into an 85% increase in pay at a time when wage growth for managerial and professional employees has been relatively stagnant. And that is $55K more a year, every year for the foreseeable future which means that annual percentage increases on that base are higher, too.

MBAs who returned to their industries actually reported slightly higher starting pay–roughly $122,000–but the bump in salary was less, a median $47,000 increase because pre-MBA pay was higher at a median of $75,000 instead of $65,000 for those who did the switch. Nothing to sneeze at, for sure. But eight grand less than if you switched careers.

Of course, all of this varies greatly depending on which career you enter and whether you leverage a summer internship into a full-time job offer. The most lucrative MBA career path today is private equity but it is almost impossible to land a PE job without prior experience. So in that case, having a work background in PE and staying in the field would likely result in the largest compensation increases of any graduating MBA today.

MBAS WHO LEVERAGE SUMMER INTERNSHIPS TYPICALLY GET THE BIGGEST BUMP

What’s driving the higher increase for career switchers is the rush into consulting by many MBAs. The standard pay package at McKinsey, Bain and BCG is a $135,000 base and a $25,000 signing bonus. And many MBAs who venture into consulting are career switchers.

Other research by the Graduate Management Admission Council, which surveys a much broader array of business schools, finds similarly impressive increases in pay, especially for graduates who gain offers from their internship employers. The study found that the average percentage increase in post-degree salary was 36% for those staying with their same employer, 70% for those accepting a new offer, and 84% for graduates who joined their internship company.

“Participating in an internship while in school typically produces an additional 28 percent increase above the baseline salary increase a student receives who does not participate in an internship,” according to the GMAC study. “After graduation, the benefits of an internship are even greater. Those who participated in an internship and received an offer of employment from that internship more than doubled the salary increase received by graduates who continued working for the same employer during and after business school.”

DON’T MISS: THE MBA BUMP: HOW MUCH TO EXPECT?