Darden | Ms. Inclusive Management
GRE 313, GPA 2.9
Stanford GSB | Mr. Mountaineer
GRE 327, GPA 2.96
Harvard | Mr. MedTech Startup
GMAT 740, GPA 3.80
Stanford GSB | Mr. SpaceX
GMAT 740, GPA 3.65
Harvard | Ms. Comeback Kid
GMAT 780, GPA 2.6
Stanford GSB | Mr. Failed Entrepreneur
GMAT 750, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Mr. Latin American
GMAT 770, GPA 8 of 10
Columbia | Mr. Oil & Gas
GMAT 710, GPA 3.37
Yale | Mr. Yale Hopeful
GMAT 750, GPA 2.9
Stanford GSB | Mr. Nuclear Vet
GMAT 770, GPA 3.86
Harvard | Mr. Deferred Admission
GRE 329, GPA 3.99
NYU Stern | Mr. NYC Consultant
GRE 327, GPA 3.47
NYU Stern | Mr. Brolic Bro
GRE 305, GPA 3.63
Tuck | Mr. Running To The Future
GMAT 720, GPA 3.5
Rice Jones | Mr. Simple Manufacturer
GRE 320, GPA 3.95
Stanford GSB | Mr. JD To MBA
GRE 326, GPA 3.01
Kellogg | Mr. Pro Sports MGMT
GMAT GMAT Waived, GPA 3.78
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Real Estate Developer
GMAT 740, GPA 3.12
Tuck | Mr. Mega Bank
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
London Business School | Mr. Commercial Lawyer
GMAT 700, GPA 3.7
McCombs School of Business | Mr. Microsoft Consultant
GMAT N/A, GPA 2.31
Columbia | Mr. MD/MBA
GMAT 670, GPA 3.77
Harvard | Ms. Tech Impact
GMAT 730, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Mr. Data & Strategy
GMAT 710 (estimate), GPA 3.4
INSEAD | Mr. Dreaming Civil Servant
GMAT 700, GPA 3.2
Tuck | Mr. Tech PM
GMAT 710, GPA 3.3
Stanford GSB | Mr. Future MBA
GMAT 740, GPA 3.78

2020 Best 40 Under 40 Professors: Andrey Golubov, University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management

Andrey Golubov of the University of Toronto is a Best 40 Under 40 MBA Professor

Andrey Golubov is the epitome of the type of professor we set out to recognize when creating this list. He’s just 31. He has more than 600 Google Scholar citations. And he’s already won multiple teaching awards at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management where he is an assistant professor of finance.

“Professor Andrey Golubov has been an outstanding teacher and researcher at the Rotman School,” a Rotman representative wrote in a nomination of Golubov. “He has taught in the Rotman MBA program all sections of Mergers and Acquisitions since 2016 when he was only 27 years old. Last year he received an almost perfect teaching evaluation from one of his classes receiving 6.97 out of 7! He also teaches students who are closer to his parents’ age in the Directors Education Program, our flagship corporate governance program. On the research side, he regularly publishes in the top tier finance journals including the Journal of Finance.”

Golubov has won the Rotman School Teaching Award for the past two years (2o18 and 2019) and has already been awarded the Governor’s Award from the Bank of Canada this year (2020).

“Professor Golubov is a great teacher. I am taking his Mergers and Acquisition class,” another nominator said. “Professor Golubov is very respectful, facilitates the class discussion properly. He is also very calm and pays attention to a student’s needs and either answers the queries in class or outside the class. He also knows a lot about M&A, and can always pinpoint the fundamental issues of an M&A related problem. I think he is one of the best professors I dealt with, and for me the teaching style of a professor is very important. It can decide whether a student will be interested in a particular class or topic.”

Outside of the classroom, Golubov says he enjoys “physical activity of all sorts.” Most often, he says, that means cross-country skiing in the winter and trekking and climbing in the summer. He also enjoys playing the piano and guitar.

Andrey Golubov

Assistant Professor of Finance

Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Current age: 31

At current institution since what year? 2015

Education: Ph.D. in Finance, University of Surrey, M.Sc. International Financial Management, University of Surrey, B.A. (Hons) in Economics, MIRBIS Institute

List of MBA courses you currently teach: “Mergers and Acquisitions”

TELL US ABOUT YOUR LIFE AS A PROFESSOR

I knew I wanted to be a business school professor when… I actually never thought I would be a professor. The idea never crossed my mind until one of the finance professors during my Master’s studies — Prof. Dimitris Petmezas — suggested that I do a Ph.D. Once I had a taste of what academia entails, I never looked back. Thank you Dimitris for this nudge (and for becoming my advisor, mentor, and friend)!

What are you currently researching and what is the most significant discovery you’ve made from it?

Most of my research revolves around mergers and acquisitions and how they impact various stakeholders. One of the most significant recent discoveries is that, contrary to conventional wisdom, mergers do not destroy jobs.

If I weren’t a business school professor… I would be a finance professional or a lawyer. 

What do you think makes you stand out as a professor? 

I am tall, so I quite literally stand out. Jokes aside, it is probably the teaching methods I choose. I tend to use unlikely combinations: seemingly abstract theory together with highly practical tools, large-sample evidence along with case studies, interactive and free-flowing discussions yet directed and structured.

One word that describes my first time teaching: Surreal

Here’s what I wish someone would’ve told me about being a business school professor:

I wish I knew that actual classroom time is just the tip of the iceberg and that behind every hour of class there are many hours of preparation, planning, and grading.

Professor I most admire and why:

Some inspiring professors from my undergraduate studies come to mind. In particular, Prof. Sagitov, Prof. Stankovskaya, and Prof. Lukashin, who taught me mathematical methods, economic theory, and econometrics, respectively. They stood out for their ability to relate abstract and challenging concepts to real-world applications, as well as for motivating me to work harder. Incidentally, from the subject matter perspective, much of what I do today builds on what they taught me.

STUDENTS

What do you enjoy most about teaching business students?

They keep me on my toes. Business school students demand that the teaching we provide be relevant, engaging, and rigorous — all at the same time. They discipline me and motivate me to deliver my best (and in turn, I try to keep them to the same standard).

What is most challenging? 

Managing different expectations, needs, and preferences. 

In one word, describe your favorite type of student: Engaged

In one word, describe your least favorite type of student: Confrontational 

When it comes to grading, I think students would describe me as… Reasonable

LIFE OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM

What are your hobbies?  

Physical activity of all sorts, most notably cross-country skiing in the winter and trekking/climbing in the summer. I also enjoy playing music (piano and guitar) and everything that has to do with space. 

How will you spend your summer? 

Catching up on my research projects, and hopefully, attending a conference or two. Professors getting summers off is largely a myth, although I usually manage to tag on a few vacation days to my conference travel.

Favorite place(s) to vacation: Anywhere with mountains. In the last few years, I have ascended Mount Triglav in Slovenia, Ben-Nevis in Scotland, and Pico Posets in the Spanish Pyrenees.

Favorite book(s): Science-fiction, notably by Ray Bradbury, H.G. Wells, and Alexander Belyaev.

What is currently your favorite movie and/or show and what is it about the film or program that you enjoy so much?

I do not watch TV shows. One of my all-time favorite films is “Pan’s Labyrinth” by Guillermo del Toro: great cinematography, great soundtrack, and a powerful message. 

What is your favorite type of music or artist(s) and why?

My music tastes are very eclectic: from classical and jazz to rock ballads and techno/house.

THOUGHTS AND REFLECTIONS

If I had my way, the business school of the future would have much more of this… Hands-on and interactive forms of learning that equip students with practical skills.

In my opinion, companies and organizations today need to do a better job at… Structuring the incentives of key decision-makers and employees more broadly.

I’m grateful for… Having a job that calls on me to think about problems I find personally interesting.

Faculty, students, alumni, and/or administrators say:

“Andrey is an expert in mergers & acquisitions, bringing together practical knowledge with theory to produce top quality finance research. He is an invaluable member of my Ph.D. committee, as he is extremely knowledgeable in several strands of literature and is always drawing on important references in research discussions. He is also a well-respected teacher who uses case-based teaching effectively to help students understand the mergers & acquisitions landscape, including market trends, deal execution, and valuation. Andrey is also excellent at incorporating academic research into his teaching, including his own published and working papers. Above all, Andrey is a wonderful colleague that I am honored to work with!”

“Prof. Andrey Golubov has been an outstanding teacher and researcher at the Rotman School. He has taught in the Rotman MBA program all sections of “Mergers and Acquisitions” since 2016 when he was only 27 years old. Last year he received an almost perfect teaching evaluation from one of his classes receiving 6.97 out of 7! He also teaches students who are closer to his parents age in the Directors Education Program, our flagship corporate governance program. On the research side, he regularly publishes in the top tier finance journals including the Journal of Finance.”

“Professor Golubov is a great teacher. I am taking his Mergers and Acquisition class. Professor Golubov is very respectful, facilitates the class discussion properly. He is also very calm and pays attention to a student’s needs and either answers the queries in class or outside the class. He also knows a lot about M&A, and can always pinpoint the fundamental issues of an M&A related problem. I think he is one of the best professors I dealt with, and for me, the teaching style of a professor is very important. It can decide whether a student will be interested in a particular class or topic.”

DON’T MISS: THE ENTIRE 2020 LIST OF THE WORLD’S BEST 40-UNDER-40 BUSINESS SCHOOL PROFESSORS