Stanford Apps Down 8.9%; Fewer Women

by John A. Byrne on

Stanford’s Class of 2013 versus Classes of 2012-2010

Characteristic Class of 2013 Class of 2012 Class of 2011 Class of 2010
Class Size 396 389 385 370
Applications 6,618 7,204 7,536 6,575
Women 35% 39% 34% 36%
International 38% 37% 33% 34%
U.S. Minority 29% 23% 21% 24%
Work Experience 4 years 4 years 4 years 3.9 years
Work Exp. Range 0-18 0-13 0-21 0-11
GMAT Average 731 728 730* 730*
GMAT Range 530-790 580-790 540-800 530-790
TOEFL Average 111 113 112 280
TOEFL Range 100-119 101-119 104-120 253-287
Countries Represented 56 53 53 53
Schools Represented 154 154 151 148
Undergraduate Majors:
Business 20% 19% 17% 19%
Engineering/Math 35% 31% 36% 35%
Humanities 45% 50% 47% 46%
Pre-MBA Work:
Consulting 16% 20% 20% 17%
Finance 28% 26% 30% 30%
Non-Profit 13% 8% 9% 11%
High Tech 10% 8% 6% 9%

Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business School Profiles.

Notes: TOEFL scores and ranges are Internet-based as of the Class of 2011. GMAT average for 2011 and 2010 not readily available. Median scores used for those years. Engineering and Math category for undergraduate majors includes natural sciences, while humanities category includes social sciences. Finance category in pre-MBA work includes private equity and venture capital; non-profit includes military and government.

DON’T MISS: HARVARD CLASS OF 2013 PROFILE or WHARTON CLASS OF 2013 PROFILE

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  • Sandep

    John, cannot wait to see Booth 2013′s stats!! I heard that in the welcoming speech the Dean Kumar said class of 2013 also beat GMAT record.

  • Andreas

    Jon,
    My brother told me Stanford routinely had GMATs in the 730s in the 1990s. Are you sure this is a record?

    Also are you talking averages or medians as you compare Stanford’s average 731 to Harvard’s median 730 and Wharton’s median 720.

  • http://poetsandquants.com/members/jbyrne/ John A. Byrne

    Jon,

    The average is a record. Sorry I can’t give you apples to apples comparisons. This is a result of Stanford reporting.

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