Harvard | Ms. Female Sales Leader
GMAT 740 (target), GPA 3.45
Chicago Booth | Mr. Unilever To MBB
GRE 308, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Mr. Finance
GMAT 750, GPA 3.0
MIT Sloan | Ms. Rocket Engineer
GMAT 710, GPA 3.9
Harvard | Mr. Defense Engineer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
Kellogg | Mr. Maximum Impact
GMAT Waiver, GPA 3.77
Kellogg | Mr. Concrete Angel
GRE 318, GPA 3.33
Chicago Booth | Mr. Healthcare PM
GMAT 730, GPA 2.8
INSEAD | Mr. Product Manager
GMAT 740, GPA 63%
Kellogg | Ms. Sustainable Development
GRE N/A, GPA 3.4
UCLA Anderson | Mr. SME Consulting
GMAT 740, GPA 3.55 (as per WES paid service)
Wharton | Mr. Future Non-Profit
GMAT 720, GPA 8/10
Harvard | Mr. Military Quant
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Mr. Healthcare PE
GRE 340, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Renewables Athlete
GMAT 710 (1st take), GPA 3.63
Kellogg | Ms. Big4 M&A
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Army Aviator
GRE 314, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Ms. Gay Techie
GRE 332, GPA 3.88
INSEAD | Mr. INSEAD Aspirant
GRE 322, GPA 3.5
Chicago Booth | Ms. Indian Banker
GMAT 740, GPA 9.18/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Army Engineer
GRE 326, GPA 3.89
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Salesman
GMAT 700, GPA 3.0
Tuck | Mr. Liberal Arts Military
GMAT 680, GPA 2.9
Columbia | Mr. Energy Italian
GMAT 700, GPA 3.5
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Quality Assurance
GMAT 770, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Mr. African Energy
GMAT 750, GPA 3.4
NYU Stern | Ms. Luxury Retail
GMAT 730, GPA 2.5

How To Select An MBA Admissions Consultant

Keytodoor“My consultant was a complete scam. She’s really money grubbing, obsessed with Coach products, and her positioning did not help me get into an Ivy League business school. It was a waste of $7,000, and she had the audacity to give me a discount rate to try again next year.”

An unhappy customer, for sure. The applicant worked with a major MBA admissions consultant and came away believing he was ripped off. He’s not alone. What complicates a good match between an applicant and a consultant is the fact that most of the larger firms in the space employ their advisers on a freelance basis. So the quality of those contractors can be inconsistent. It’s like that old saw about the Boy Scouts or the Girl Scouts. If you have a terrific scout master, you’re likely to have a great experience. If you’re stuck with a so-so leader, you’re likely to sour on the whole idea of scouting.

Selecting the right firm and the right person isn’t easy. Exact numbers are hard to come by, but there probably are as many as 300 firms with more than 500 MBA admissions consultants around the world. Overall, consulting to MBA clients alone is a business with annual revenues of at least $35 million worldwide.

Applicants to business school are the most likely graduate students to use consultants, far more than law or medical school applicants, says VeritasPrep co-founder Chad Troutwine. More than a dozen consultants estimate that a quarter to a third of the applicants to the top ten business schools now use their services. At Harvard, Stanford and Wharton, as many as half of the applicants now pay for advice at between $5,000 and $10,000 a pop.

Dan Bauer of The MBA Exchange

“Some applicants are instantly attracted to the most visible firms, assuming that the ability to produce daily blogs, hourly tweets and $10 “inside secrets” books correlates to achieving admissions success,” says Dan Bauer, founder and managing director of The MBA Exchange. “Other applicants are drawn to smaller boutique admissions firms that promise one-on-one care, but lack the depth of resources and breadth of experience to add real value and provide 24/7 access.”

Of course, a consultant is not a must expense. The majority of applicants to B-school do perfectly fine on their own. Chioma Isiadinso, who offers advice to applicants at Poets&Quants and founded EXPARTUS after a stint as the assistant director of admissions at Harvard Business School, puts it this way: “In my mind there are three types of applicants,” she says. “One, do-it-yourself candidates (pick up a few good books, do their homework and hit the grounding running); Two, candidates who need a bit of help: these candidates start off doing a lot of the heaving lifting on their own and then hire consultants for a little bit of polishing, essay editing, etc; and three, candidates who need a lot of work: These candidates want help across all aspects of the application and are very thorough and unwilling to leave anything to chance. They typically want strategic and editing help. The key is knowing which kind of a candidate you are and planning ahead—this will save you a lot of time and wasted effort.”

How do you increase the odds of a successful match? We turned to several prominent admissions consultants and asked them to give us their advice on how to hire the right consultant. Linda Abraham of Accepted.com suggests that would-be clients review a consultant’s website and offerings. Abraham says you should ask these questions: “Do you like what you see? Do they provide clear descriptions of services and prices? Do they offer want you want? How long have they been in business? What are their qualifications?”

She further advises that you talk to a member of the company’s staff, preferably the one you will be working with. Find out how the firm works. “Will you work consistently with one consultant or will you be shunted around to different ‘specialists’? What if your consultant gets sick? Is there back up? Request references if you do not know someone who has used the service.”

Bauer, who has an audit firm independently measure his success rate with clients, has an eight-point checklist:

    • Require independent, documented proof of past admissions success and client satisfaction. Why invest your future in someone who can’t prove their claims?
    • Choose a consulting firm whose consultants have experience in both admissions and business. That’s the combination that will help you build and then present your most compelling candidacy.

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.