McCombs School of Business | Ms. Second Chances
GRE 310, GPA 2.4
Rice Jones | Mr. Back To School
GRE 315, GPA 3.0
Cornell Johnson | Mr. IT To IB
GMAT 660, GPA 3.60
Stanford GSB | Mr. Entrepreneurial Bassist
GMAT 740, GPA 3.61
Kellogg | Mr. Green Business
GMAT 680, GPA 3.33; 3.9 for Masters
Duke Fuqua | Ms. Account Executive
GMAT 560, GPA 3.3
NYU Stern | Mr. Military Officer
GRE In Progress, GPA 2.88
Kellogg | Mr. Real Estate Finance
GMAT 710, GPA 3.0
Kellogg | Mr. Finance To Education
GMAT 730, GPA 3.4
Stanford GSB | Ms. Artistic Engineer
GMAT 730, GPA 9.49/10
Emory Goizueta | Mr. Multimedia
GRE 308, GPA 3.4
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Commercial Banker
GMAT 700, GPA 3.3
IU Kelley | Mr. Construction Manager
GRE 680, GPA 3.02
Harvard | Mr. Healthcare Fanatic
GMAT 770, GPA 3.46
Harvard | Mr. Sovereign Wealth Fund
GMAT 730, GPA 3.55
Harvard | Mr. Smart Operations
GMAT 760, GPA 4.0
Darden | Mr. Strategy Manager
GRE 321, GPA 3.5
Ross | Mr. Airline Engineer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.73
Stanford GSB | Mr. Corporate VC Hustler
GMAT 780, GPA 3.17
Wharton | Mr. Marketing Director
GMAT 710, GPA 3.3
Ross | Ms. Healthcare Startup
GRE 321, GPA 3.51
Georgetown McDonough | Ms. Air Force
GMAT 610, GPA 3.8
Stanford GSB | Mr. JD To MBA
GRE 326, GPA 3.01
Harvard | Mr. MacGruber
GRE 313, GPA 3.7
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Poet At Heart
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
Yale | Mr. Ukrainian Biz Man
GRE 310, GPA 4.75 out of 5
Darden | Mr. Former Scientist
GMAT 680, GPA 3.65

Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business

Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business is ranked sixth among the best U.S. business schools by Poets&Quants.

8. Dartmouth College

Tuck School of Business

100 Tuck Hall

Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

Admissions: 603-646-3162

Email: tuck.admissions@tuck.dartmouth.edu

Website: http://www.tuck.dartmouth.edu/

Apply Online: http://www.tuck.dartmouth.edu/admissions/apply/

Admission Deadlines for Class of 2016:

Early Action: 10/9/13

November Round: 11/6/13

January Round: 1/3/14

April Round: 4/2/14

If MBA education were like ice cream, Tuck would be one of a handful of premium brands. This is a super rich and delicious concoction of an MBA education, a picture perfect business school solely dedicated to providing students with the ultimate MBA experience. There are no business undergraduates sharing the halls, nor part-time MBAs in evening classes, nor Executive MBAs who come in on Friday nights. The school’s executive education offerings are limited. All this allows Tuck to focus virtually all of its resources and energy on one thing: a full-time MBA program. In a day and age when most business schools are juggling all kinds of programs that siphon off the best faculty from the full-time MBAs, Tuck stays true to its mission of guaranteeing every student a truly transformative and intimate MBA experience. This is a rare and beautiful thing if you want the premium version of the degree.

The school does this in a spectacular New England setting, isolated in Hanover, N.H., away from the distractions of a busy city. At Tuck, most students have the option of living in lavishly appointed dorms right on the school’s own first class business school campus. The school’s world-class teachers are known for their excellence and are in a class with Harvard Business School and the University of Virginia’s Darden School. Attending a Tuck class is to witness a master teacher in action, soliciting differing opinions in rapid fire style, moving every student along a challenging but entertaining journey to some final destination where the big idea or thought waits to be unfolded. Harvard, Tuck and Darden have at least two other attributes in common: 1) MBA students at these three schools are taught largely and almost exclusively by the case method, and 2) The first-year curriculum is a lockstep program where cohorts of the same students move through the courses together. Harvard’s cohorts are 50% larger than those at Tuck and Darden so there is less pressure to fight for air time during the vigorous discussions in class where participation accounts for half your grade. The bonds students form in their sections often endure a life time.

Tuck, like Darden, has a highly collaborative and caring culture where MBA candidates genuinely support and encourage each other. Backstabbing at Tuck is unheard of. In fact, some corporate recruiters say the students here are just too damn nice. That’s an accusation that also befalls Darden. And unlike many of the big MBA factories, Tuck offers the quintessential intimate experience: small cohorts and class sizes. By the time a student graduates from Tuck, he or she knows every single classmate who’s wearing a cap and gown at commencement.

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.