Cambridge Judge Business School | Ms. Story-Teller To Data-Cruncher
GMAT 700 (anticipated), GPA 3.5 (converted from Australia)
Stanford GSB | Mr. Failed Startup Founder
GMAT 740, GPA 4
Kellogg | Mr. Operator
GMAT 740, GPA 4.17/4.3
MIT Sloan | Mr. Energy Transition
GMAT 760, GPA 3.95
Harvard | Mr. STEM Minor
GMAT 740, GPA 3.78
INSEAD | Mr. Sustainability PM
GRE 335, GPA 3.5
INSEAD | Mr. Business Manager
GMAT 750, GPA 3.0
HEC Paris | Mr. Productivity Focused
GMAT 700, GPA 3.6
Emory Goizueta | Mr. Tech Engineer
GRE 310, GPA 4.0
McCombs School of Business | Mr. CRE
GMAT 625, GPA 3.4
Wharton | Mr. Finance Nerd
GMAT 750, GPA 3.7
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Army Marketing
GRE 327, GPA 3.8
Darden | Mr. Financial World
GMAT 730, GPA 7.8
Harvard | Mr. First Gen Consultant
GMAT 710, GPA 4.0 (First Class Honours)
Wharton | Mr. Global Perspective
GMAT 750, GPA 3.6
INSEAD | Ms. Marketing Supe Latina
GMAT 720-740 (anticipated), GPA 3.1 (last two years 3.4)
Stanford GSB | Mr. Financial Solutions
GRE 313, GPA 3.62
Wharton | Mr. Valuation Specialist
GMAT 710, GPA 4.0
Cambridge Judge Business School | Mr. Commercial Engineer
GMAT 680, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Schoolmaster
GMAT 710 (to re-take), GPA 3.5 (Converted from UK)
Wharton | Ms. Atypical Applicant
GRE 314, GPA 3.1
Wharton | Mr. Passion Projects
GMAT 730, GPA 3.15
MIT Sloan | Mr. MBB Transformation
GMAT 760, GPA 3.46
Yale | Mr. Army Logistics
GRE 310, GPA 3.72
Stanford GSB | Mr. Clown
GMAT 740, GPA 3.85
Chicago Booth | Mr. EduTech
GRE 337, GPA 3.9
MIT Sloan | Mr. Sans-Vertebrae
GMAT 730, GPA 3.78

Rankings Still Sway Most MBA Applicants

FEMALE APPLICANTS MORE LIKELY TO PREFER GRE

Not surprisingly, the survey found that the vast majority of business school applicants–just under 90%–submit the GMAT with their applications. But AIGAC found that female applicants were more likely to prefer the GRE than men, mostly because of the test format and outcomes as well as the flexibility it gave them to apply to non-business programs (see below). Respondents said they preferred the GRE because it gave them the option to “skip questions and return later” to them, or because they could change their responses during the test, or because they had already “struggled” with the GMAT.

Source: 2014-2015 AIGAC applicant survey

Source: 2014-2015 AIGAC applicant survey

Shrum said the GMAT remains the “largest source of anxiety” for business school applicants. “Many of them see the GMAT as a smoking gun,” he said. Many applicants who are either rejected by their target schools or waitlisted think, “‘If only I had taken it again or had a higher score I could have gotten in.’ For some people who have given up on the GMAT, they are increasingly choosing the GRE. This is still a small number, but it is an interesting trend, and women express that far more than men. As many as one in six women submitted either the GRE or both. With men it is one in ten. This is a meaningful difference, and it is something that jumped out at us.”

Source: 2014-2015 AIGAC applicant survey

Source: 2014-2015 AIGAC applicant survey

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.