Harvard | Mr. Soldier Boy
GMAT 720, GPA 3.72
Tuck | Mr. First Gen Student
GMAT 740, GPA 3.0
Stanford GSB | Mr. Amazon Alexa PM
GMAT 710, GPA 3.5
Stanford GSB | Mr. Marine Investment Banker
GMAT 700, GPA 3.2
UCLA Anderson | Mr. California Dreamin’
GRE 318, GPA 3.7
Harvard | Mr. Native Norwegian
GMAT 730, GPA 4.0
MIT Sloan | Mr. Tech Enthusiast
GRE 325, GPA 6.61/10
Harvard | Ms. Fashion Tech
GMAT 690, GPA 3.8
Stanford GSB | Mr. Energy Innovation
GMAT 790, GPA 3.9
Kellogg | Ms. Connecting The Dots
GMAT 690, GPA 2.9
Wharton | Mr. Latinx Career Pivot
GMAT 720, GPA 3.4
Harvard | Mr. Big 4 Auditor
GMAT 740, GPA 3.55
Darden | Mr. Military Vet
GMAT 680, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Diversity Finance
GMAT 750, GPA 3.65
Kellogg | Mr. Social Impact Initiative
GMAT 710, GPA 3.1
MIT Sloan | Ms. Health & Law
GMAT 730, GPA 3.21
Wharton | Mr. Magistrate Auditor
GMAT 720, GPA 16.67/20
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Digital Health
GMAT 760, GPA 3.42
HEC Paris | Ms Journalist
GRE -, GPA 3.5
Kellogg | Mr. Concrete Angel
GRE 318, GPA 3.33
Stanford GSB | Ms. CPA To MBA
GMAT 710, GPA 3.9
MIT Sloan | Mr. Michelin Man
GMAT 780, GPA 8.46/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Airline Developer
GMAT 740, GPA 3.48
Harvard | Mr. Latino Banker
GRE 332, GPA 3.1
Stanford GSB | Mr. Lean Manufacturing
GMAT 720, GPA 3.6
INSEAD | Mr. INSEAD Hopeful
GMAT -, GPA 2.9
Darden | Ms. Environmental Engineer
GMAT 710, GPA 3.3

Dartmouth’s Tuck School vs. Harvard Business School

Admissions: Both HBS and Tuck are highly selective schools. Harvard sends offer letters to just 12.2% of its applicants, while Dartmouth accepts 18.8%. Harvard’s average GMAT score for the Class of 2011 is 719 versus an average of 712 for Dartmouth.

Admission StatsDartmouthHarvard
Average GMAT712719
GMAT Range580–790490–800
Average GPA3.533.67
Selectivity18.8%12.2%
YieldNA89%

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Enrollment: Dartmouth’s class size is less than half that of Harvard, resulting in a more intimate and close-knit community environment. The numbers for women, international and minority students are for the Class of 2011.

Enrollment StatsDartmouthHarvard
Total MBA Enrollment5101,837
Women33%36%
International30%36%
Minority18%22%

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Poets&Quants: Though you might expect a lot more poets at Tuck, you’d be surprised to discover that students at Dartmouth with undergraduate degrees in the humanities are few: 26% versus Harvard’s 40% or Stanford’s 47%.  On the other hand, Tuck is much more open to enrolling business undergrads than Harvard. About 41% of Dartmouth’s Class of 2011 have business or economics undergraduate degrees, making them the biggest single chunk of the class, while only 26% have such degrees at Harvard.

Undergrad DegreesDartmouthHarvard
Humanities26%40%
Engineering/Math27%33%
Business/Economics41%26%

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Jobs and Pay: Even these two elite business schools were impacted by the severe recession of 2009. Nearly a third of Dartmouth’s Class of 2009 didn’t have jobs when they graduated and nearly a quarter of Harvard MBAs were in the same boat. Grads from both schools fared much better three months after commencement, but these numbers are rare lows for the two of the best business schools in the world. Starting pay for Tuckies is third best, after only Stanford and Harvard. The estimates of median pay over a full career come from a study by PayScale done for BusinessWeek and do not include stock options or equity stakes by entrepreneurs. Harvard grads were first in this study, while Dartmouth grads came in fifth, behind HBS, Wharton, Columbia, and Stanford. The flow of grads into higher-paying finance careers at Wharton and Columbia help those schools on this measurement.

Job & Pay DataDartmouthHarvard
Starting salary & bonus$128,282$131,219
MBAs employed at commencement69.2%76.8%
MBAs employed 3 months after commencement82.8%87.3%
Estimated median pay & bonus over a full career$3,146,032$3,867,903

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.