Interview Questions Harvard Will Ask

Some other questions:

“Walk me through your resume.”

Analysis: “Make your resume tell a story rather than merely relate a series of unconnected events. Focus on upward progression. If there’s a gap in your resume—perhaps from a period of unemployment—don’t shy away from that but also don’t dwell on it. Just mention it and move on. Now more than ever, the Admissions team will understand—even expect—brief periods of unemployment. Also be sure to cap your time. Keep you ‘walk’ to five minutes, and don’t spend all your time in one area versus another. For example, don’t dwell on your college experience to the detriment of your actual relevant work experience.”

“Forget that I read your applications and tell me about yourself.”

Advice: “You should have a prepared story that you rehearse over and over throughout the coming weeks. You know you’re going to get some kind of intro question that’s specific to you and specific to your story, so practice it like an elevator pitch. If you’ve got one minute, what are you going to tell people about yourself?”

“How did you decide to attend your undergraduate college?”

Advice: “Business school is a situation in which you’re constantly making big decisions, and you need to be able to convey what your assumptions were and what your thought process was in three bullet points. Likewise, that’s how you should attack any question asking why you made a big decision. Say this is what I was looking for in my undergraduate college, and this is what my college of choice offered. Be rational, be honest and be professional.”

“How would your friends (or boss, or network, etc.) describe you, in three words?”

Advice: “First off, you can certainly be more eloquent than others would be if tasked with describing you! This is your chance to show how you want to be portrayed. Use this question as an opportunity to showcase your strengths, especially those you feel may not have come across in your application. Though relatively exhaustive, the HBS application is by no means a complete representation of anyone. That’s why you’re interviewing in the first place!”

DON’T MISS: HOW NOT TO BLOW YOUR HARVARD INTERVIEW or CLEAVAGE AND HAIR LEGS A NO-NO AT HARVARD

About the Author...

John A. Byrne

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.