Georgetown McDonough | Mr. Navy Vet
GRE 310, GPA 2.6
Stanford GSB | Mr. Pizza For Breakfast
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
INSEAD | Mr. Behavioral Changes
GRE 336, GPA 5.8/10
Chicago Booth | Ms. IB Hopeful
GMAT 710, GPA 2.77
London Business School | Mr. Indian Banking Leader
GMAT 750, GPA 3.32
Columbia | Mr. Infra-Finance
GMAT 710, GPA 3.68
Kenan-Flagler | Mr. Top Performer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Ms. Comeback Kid
GMAT 780, GPA 2.6
Darden | Mr. Military Communications Officer
GRE Not taken yet, GPA 3.4
Kellogg | Ms. Retail To Technology
GMAT 670, GPA 3.8
Ross | Mr. Top 25 Hopeful
GMAT 680, GPA 3.3
UCLA Anderson | Ms. Qualcomm Quality
GMAT 660, GPA 3.4
Chicago Booth | Ms. Hotel Real Estate
GMAT 730, GPA 3.75
Chicago Booth | Mr. EduTech
GRE 337, GPA 3.9
Yale | Mr. Gay Social Scientist
GMAT 740, GPA 2.75 undergrad, 3.8 in MS
MIT Sloan | Mrs. Company Leader
GMAT 760, GPA 2.92
Wharton | Mr. Cross-Border
GMAT 780, GPA 3.7
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Career Change
GMAT Have yet to take. Consistent 705 on practice tests., GPA 3.5
HEC Paris | Mr. Introverted Dancer
GMAT 720, GPA 4.0
Kellogg | Mr. Safety Guy
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
Kellogg | Mr. Danish Raised, US Based
GMAT 710, GPA 10.6 out of 12
Harvard | Mr. Aspiring FinTech Entrepreneur
GMAT 750, GPA 3.9
Stanford GSB | Mr. Fill In The Gaps
GRE 330, GPA 3.21
McCombs School of Business | Mr. Texas Recruiter
GMAT 770, GPA 3.04
USC Marshall | Mr. Strategy Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 4.0
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Entertainment Agency
GMAT 750, GPA 3.8
Chicago Booth | Mr. Quant
GMAT 750, GPA 3.7

Did You Get Good News From HBS?

PrintWHAT YOU SHOULD WEAR TO YOUR HBS INTERVIEW

The guide also counsels applicants on how to look the part when you show up for an HBS admissions interview. “The interview guide goes into things that people might never have thought before and sometimes it states the obvious,” says Mohamed. “There are some basics: Comb your hair, brush your teeth, and clip your nails. It is because people can use the advice as a check mark as they prepare for their interview.”

For women, The Harbus advises, a suit color and style that is simple and classic.

Skirt lengths need to be at least knee length. Make sure tops fit appropriately. When in doubt, choose a conservative cut.

Wear closed toed pumps with a heel height of one to three inches.

Hair and make-up should be natural and clean. That means avoiding the colorful, vibrant palette and opting for neutral subtle tones. Keep hair out of your face and do not play with it during interviews. Your best option is to pull your hair out of your face to avoid it becoming a distraction.

Do not wear perfume or any other strong fragrance. Do wear deodorant.

Mints are helpful but make sure it’s dissolved before you start the interview. Gum is not acceptable.

Handbags should be left at home unless they could theoretically fit a legal pad and laptop, opt for a large structured tote.

Choose jewelry/accessories that complement your outfit, not flashy baubles that distract. Pearls are fail-safe, though if you’d like to express your sense of style, that’s fine, just keep it classic and simple.

Keep your look clean and professional.

GUYS SHOULD ONLY WEAR BLACK, GREY OR NAVY BLUE

sales guyFor men, The Harbus recommends a suit color palate of black, grey, or navy blue for the formal interview.

You may choose plain or (sensible) pin-stripes. Reserved sport coat also works, though a good suit is fail-safe.

Black does not go with brown. A black suit requires a black belt, shoes, socks. Navy pairs best with brown accessories.

Shirt/tie color should not be distracting.

Make sure the suit fits properly. Ask a tailor (or you mom).

Do not wear cologne or anything else that has a strong smell. Do wear deodorant.

DON’T MISS: THE TOUGHEST AND MOST UNPREDICTABLE QUESTIONS HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL ASKS MBA APPLICANTS or HOW NOT TO BLOW YOUR HBS ADMISSIONS INTERVIEW

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.