Chicago Booth | Ms. IB Hopeful
GMAT 710, GPA 2.77
London Business School | Mr. Indian Banking Leader
GMAT 750, GPA 3.32
Georgetown McDonough | Mr. Navy Vet
GRE 310, GPA 2.6
Columbia | Mr. Infra-Finance
GMAT 710, GPA 3.68
Stanford GSB | Mr. Pizza For Breakfast
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
Kenan-Flagler | Mr. Top Performer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Ms. Comeback Kid
GMAT 780, GPA 2.6
Darden | Mr. Military Communications Officer
GRE Not taken yet, GPA 3.4
Kellogg | Ms. Retail To Technology
GMAT 670, GPA 3.8
Ross | Mr. Top 25 Hopeful
GMAT 680, GPA 3.3
UCLA Anderson | Ms. Qualcomm Quality
GMAT 660, GPA 3.4
Chicago Booth | Ms. Hotel Real Estate
GMAT 730, GPA 3.75
Chicago Booth | Mr. EduTech
GRE 337, GPA 3.9
Yale | Mr. Gay Social Scientist
GMAT 740, GPA 2.75 undergrad, 3.8 in MS
MIT Sloan | Mrs. Company Leader
GMAT 760, GPA 2.92
Wharton | Mr. Cross-Border
GMAT 780, GPA 3.7
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Career Change
GMAT Have yet to take. Consistent 705 on practice tests., GPA 3.5
HEC Paris | Mr. Introverted Dancer
GMAT 720, GPA 4.0
Kellogg | Mr. Safety Guy
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
Kellogg | Mr. Danish Raised, US Based
GMAT 710, GPA 10.6 out of 12
Harvard | Mr. Aspiring FinTech Entrepreneur
GMAT 750, GPA 3.9
Stanford GSB | Mr. Fill In The Gaps
GRE 330, GPA 3.21
INSEAD | Mr. Behavioral Changes
GRE 336, GPA 5.8/10
McCombs School of Business | Mr. Texas Recruiter
GMAT 770, GPA 3.04
USC Marshall | Mr. Strategy Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 4.0
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Entertainment Agency
GMAT 750, GPA 3.8
Chicago Booth | Mr. Quant
GMAT 750, GPA 3.7

Stanford GSB ‘Working On STEM Certification’

Will Stanford GSB soon join the ranks of U.S. business schools with STEM pathways? In a statement, a spokeswoman says the school is “working collaboratively with our students and across Stanford University on STEM certification.” File photo

‘A PIVOTAL MOMENT’ FOR GSB

The STEM Optional Practical Training program is available to eligible F-1 visa students with STEM degrees from accredited U.S. colleges or universities. The OPT program itself was launched in 1992; in 2008, Michael Chertoff, then secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, controversially extended the program by 17 months for graduates of STEM-certified programs. The extension was expanded to 24 months in 2016. Eligible business school graduates may apply for the additional two years of work on top of the initial one-year, post-completion OPT granted to all non-STEM-degree F-1 visa students; to be eligible, they must have a STEM degree from an accredited U.S. school and must secure employment with an employer that includes a minimum of 20 hours of work per week and formal training within the STEM field.

The OPT program is seen as a way for B-school grads to acquire an H-1B visa, which are limited by law. In 2017, 180,440 new H-1B visas were issued. But according to just-released data by the Institute of International Education, the policy changes allowing STEM students to remain in the U.S. on OPT opportunities for three years after the completion of their studies is the likely biggest factor driving a massive increase in students on OPT programs, which jumped by 9.6% to 223,085 between 2016-2017 and 2018-2019.

As Dwivedi writes, the most popular route for highly skilled workers to remain and work in the U.S. has been the H-1B visa; in 2019, more than 200,000 applications were received for 85,000 visas.

“Failing urgent action, the management programs at Stanford GSB will become unattractive for future applicants – especially international students for whom the three-year OPT is a vital element in their choice of school/program,” Dwivedi writes. “This is a pivotal moment for the business school, where they can either decide to maintain the status quo and lose the brightest of international applicants who most certainly will lean toward schools that deliver more value by making their post-study employment prospects easier — or they can implement a change and argue for STEM classification.”

‘DESPERATE HELPLESSNESS’ FOR GSB’S INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Dwivedi, who has worked in consulting and finance in London and Zurich, Switzerland, plans to explore opportunities on the West Coast of the U.S. after she graduates this year. She writes that no matter what, she will leave Stanford with a degree from one of the finest schools in the world. But she adds that the lack of a STEM path unquestionably puts Stanford’s international students at a disadvantage to their peers, particularly when some — like rival UC-Berkeley’s Haas School — made the move to STEM retroactive to already graduated MBA classes.

“STEM or no STEM, a Stanford education will serve me and my peers well. We do not need to be reminded of this,” Dwivedi writes. “Silicon Valley engine runs on the talent we produce and the deep connections the school has cultivated with the local VC and tech community. I have been personally supported by the Dean, Associate Deans, and the administration team when I have proposed to orchestrate a discussion between them and the class (including domestic and international students). So, yes, we feel heard.”

Yet GSB students, she says, “feel the desperate helplessness when the leadership speaks of the long timelines related to any change here at sunny Stanford. But my empathy reaches its limits when I look at the long list of business schools — none, in my opinion, of the stature of Stanford — who have argued for and ultimately delivered a STEM-designated degree for their international students.”

Read all of Anupriya Dwivedi’s op-ed in The Stanford Daily here.

DON’T MISS STEM MBA PROGRAMS AT U.S. B-SCHOOLS

AND SEE P&Q’s COVERAGE OF TOP B-SCHOOLS’ EMBRACE OF STEM:

NYU STERN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE TUCK SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ROSS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY KELLOGG SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

UC-BERKELEY HAAS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

MIT SLOAN SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

UNC KENAN-FLAGLER BUSINESS SCHOOL

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY TEPPER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS