INSEAD | Mr. Fraud Associate
GMAT 750, GPA 8/10
Wharton | Ms. Project Mananger
GMAT 770, GPA 3.86
Chicago Booth | Mr. Average White Guy
GMAT 680, GPA 3.2
Stanford GSB | Mr. AIESEC Alumnus
GMAT 750, GPA 3.38
Chicago Booth | Mr. Consulting Hopeful
GMAT 720, GPA 3.6
Stanford GSB | Mr. Future VC
GMAT 750, GPA 3.6
Kellogg | Mr. Brazilian Banker
GMAT 600, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Mr. Upward Trajectory
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
Kenan-Flagler | Mr. Fish
GRE 327, GPA 3.733
Harvard | Mr. Community Impact
GMAT 690, GPA 3.0
IMD | Mr. Gap Year To IMD
GMAT 660, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Italian In Tokyo
GMAT (710-740), GPA 4.0
Stanford GSB | Mr. Blockchain
GMAT 760, GPA 3.9
Stanford GSB | Ms. Digital Health
GMAT 720, GPA 3.48
Wharton | Mr. Colombian M7 Deferral
GMAT 710, GPA 3.84
Harvard | Mr. Google Tech
GMAT 770, GPA 2.2
Harvard | Mr. MedTech Startup
GMAT 740, GPA 3.80
Yale | Mr. Healthcare Geek
GMAT 680, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Low GPA Product Manager
GMAT 780, GPA 3.1
Kenan-Flagler | Mr. Healthcare Provider
GMAT COVID19 Exemption, GPA 3.68
Kellogg | Ms. MBA For Social Impact
GMAT 720, GPA 3.9
Chicago Booth | Mr. Controller & Critic
GMAT 750, GPA 6.61 / 7.00 (equivalent to 3.78 / 4.00)
Kellogg | Mr. PE Social Impact
GMAT Waived, GPA 3.51
MIT Sloan | Mr. International Impact
GRE 326, GPA 3.5
MIT Sloan | Mr. Energy Enthusiast
GMAT 730, GPA 8.39
Chicago Booth | Ms. Future CMO
GMAT Have Not Taken, GPA 2.99
Said Business School | Mr. Global Sales Guy
GMAT 630, GPA 3.5

MBA Applications To Harvard Fall 6.7%

Warm light glows invitingly from inside Harvard Business School on a cold, winter evening..

Harvard Business School

LARGEST GROUP OF STUDENTS–28%–HAIL FROM FINANCE INDUSTRY

Harvard also disclosed that its newest class has undergraduate degrees from 137 domestic universities and 155 non-U.S. universities, though the school relies heavily on undisclosed feeder schools.

The pre-MBA industry backgrounds of this year’s students also saw small year-over-year changes. The largest industry represented in the class remains finance, with 28% of the students, up a tick from 27% last year. Some 16% of the class had jobs in venture capital and private equity, the exact same percentage as a year earlier, and 12% from financial services, up from 11%.

Students from consulting represent 15% of the new class, one point down, while those from the tech industry account for 12% of the class. Because of a change in reporting categories, that number may not compare with the 16% of students HBS reported last year in both tech and communications.

“We updated our job categories in the class profile to better align with the categories that the HBS Career and Professional Development office uses, so we’re all on the same page,” explains Losee. “This doesn’t affect how we read applications, interview, or make decisions in the admissions process, but should make it easier for students at HBS.”

Government, education and nonprofit students account for 8% of the Class of 2021, same as last year; healthcare and biotech students represent 7% of the class, same as last year; 9% come from the consumer products and e-commerce industry, while 12% had been in the energy and manufacturing industries. MBA students from the military account for 4% of this year’s entering class, a single percentage point drop from last year.

DON’T MISS: WILL THE COMING RECESSION CAUSE A BOOM IN MBA APPLICATIONS? DON’T BET ON IT or FOUR REASONS WHY THERE ARE FEWER MBA APPLICANTS IN THE PIPELINE

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.