Tips For Taking The At-Home GRE

Students from the Harvard Kennedy School, like students from Harvard Business School, wore black to show solidarity in the wake of high-profile police shootings in Tulsa and Charlotte. Courtesy photo

What MBAs Can Do To Support Black Lives

Protests have erupted across the world in response to the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police.

But what exactly can MBAs do during this time?

Holly Fetter, a Class of 2020 HBS grad, recently outlined a few ways MBAs can support the Black Lives movement.

MAKE DONATIONS

There are a number of Black-led organizations and nonprofits that are working to support Black lives.

Here is a list of organizations and causes that you can donate to today:

  • The Movement for Black Lives
    “The Movement for Black Lives (M4BL) seeks to reach millions, mobilize hundreds of thousands, and organize tens of thousands, so that Black political power is a force able to influence national and local agendas in the direction of our shared Vision for Black Lives.”
  • Minnesota Freedom Fund
    “The Minnesota Freedom Fund pays criminal bail and immigration bond for those who cannot afford to as we seek to end discriminatory, coercive, and oppressive jailing.”
  • Official George Floyd Memorial Fund
    A GoFundMe page set up by the Floyd family

JOIN A PROTEST

Protests are popping up across the globe. Now more than ever, Fetter says, is the time to join in and march.

“Collective action is key — mass movements and grassroots activists influence business leaders, public officials, and other decisionmakers,” Fetter writes.

DISCUSS

Companies and organizations are now looking at how they can do better to support the movement.

Fetter says MBAs should educate themselves about anti-black racism talk to their networks about the issues.

“Invite your classmates, friends, colleagues, and family members to talk about these issues, in person or over social media,” Fetter writes. “Don’t just talk to people whose views are aligned with yours — help grow the movement by engaging people who might not typically gravitate toward these topics.”

Sources: Harvard Business School, NBC News

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