Stanford GSB | Ms. Anthropologist
GMAT 740, GPA 3.3
MIT Sloan | Ms. Environmental Sustainability
GMAT 690, GPA 7.08
Wharton | Mr. Data Scientist
GMAT 740, GPA 7.76/10
Harvard | Ms. Nurturing Sustainable Growth
GRE 300, GPA 3.4
MIT Sloan | Ms. Senior PM Unicorn
GMAT 700, GPA 3.18
Stanford GSB | Mr. Future Tech In Healthcare
GRE 313, GPA 2.0
Harvard | Mr. Lieutenant To Consultant
GMAT 760, GPA 3.7
Duke Fuqua | Ms. Consulting Research To Consultant
GMAT 710, GPA 4.0 (no GPA system, got first (highest) division )
MIT Sloan | Mr. Agri-Tech MBA
GRE 324, GPA 4.0
Stanford GSB | Mr. “GMAT” Grimly Miserable At Tests
GMAT TBD - Aug. 31, GPA 3.9
UCLA Anderson | Ms. Tech In HR
GMAT 640, GPA 3.23
MIT Sloan | Mr. Electrical Agri-tech
GRE 324, GPA 4.0
Yale | Mr. IB To Strategy
GRE 321, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Mr. Overrepresented MBB Consultant (2+2)
GMAT 760, GPA 3.95
Kellogg | Ms. Freelance Hustler
GRE 312, GPA 4
Kellogg | Ms. Gap Fixer
GMAT 740, GPA 3.02
Harvard | Mr. Little Late For MBA
GRE 333, GPA 3.76
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Wellness Ethnographer
GRE 324, GPA 3.6
Wharton | Ms. Financial Real Estate
GMAT 720, GPA 4.0
Harvard | Mr. The Italian Dream Job
GMAT 760, GPA 4.0
NYU Stern | Mr. Labor Market Analyst
GRE 320, GPA 3.4
Wharton | Mr. Indian IT Auditor
GMAT 740, GPA 3.8
Berkeley Haas | Mr. LGBT+CPG
GMAT 720, GPA 3.95
Kellogg | Mr. Naval Architect
GMAT 740, GPA 4.0
Harvard | Mr. Navy Submariner
GRE 322, GPA 3.24
Wharton | Ms. Financial Controller Violinist
GMAT 750, GPA 4
Wharton | Mr. Music Teacher
GMAT 750, GPA 3.95

How To Write Your Stanford GSB Essay

Andrew Brodhead – Stanford News

How To Write Your Stanford GSB Essay

Stanford’s Graduate School of Business consistently ranks as one of the most prestigious b-schools in the world.

To maintain its prestige, the b-school is highly selective of who it accepts.

Matt Symonds, co-founder and director of Fortuna Admissions, recently discussed what kind of applicants Stanford GSB looks for and how applicants can write strong essays.

WHO GSB SEEKS

The ideal student at Stanford GSB, according to the school’s evaluation criteria, is someone who possesses three main characteristics: intellectual vitality, demonstrated leadership potential, and personal qualities and contributions.

“Stanford is looking not just for extremely bright and successful professionals, but also young people who have strong values, and who want to have a positive impact in the world,” Fortuna’s Heidi Hillis, Stanford GSB alum and former alumni interviewer, says. “The school genuinely wants to get to know you and to understand your values. Stanford MBAs are driven by a desire not just to excel in their careers but also to help others and to have a positive impact. The Stanford GSB admissions office works very hard to bring together a group of students who are open, humble and have strong integrity, which leads to the incredible level of camaraderie and trust that you find at the school. This is really core to Stanford’s brand and the identity of its community.”

ESSAY A

Stanford GSB’s first essay asks applicants to explain “What Matters Most to You and Why?

Symonds says this essay is the heart and core of the GSB application. Rather than thinking of clever or profound ways of answering this prompt, Symonds recommends applicants to really take the time to think about the question and uncover insights in their life’s purpose and values.

“To best tackle the structure of this essay, start with identifying a person, event, or experience that greatly impacted you, and think about the morals, values, and lessons you gained from this experience or interaction,” Symonds writes. “How do you use these lessons today, and how do they impact your drive, your motivation, and your vision of the world? Perhaps you can link them to the development of your career and the life choices you have made? This is a place to get personal, dig deep and to be courageous.”

ESSAY B

The second GSB essay asks applicants the classic “Why Stanford?”

This essay, unlike the first one, focuses on a student’s future and how an MBA from GSB will help students achieve their goals.

“Here, your school research really needs to shine,” Symonds writes. “What classes, clubs, events or other elements of the program and community will catalyze the impact you are aiming to make in the short, medium and long term? Dig deep and get specific, show Stanford that you’ve done more than just read the GSB website.”

Read additional tips for writing the GSB options essays here.

Sources: Fortuna Admissions, Stanford GSB, Poets & Quants

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