USC Marshall | Mr. Ambitious
GRE 323, GPA 3.01
Stanford GSB | Ms. East Africa Specialist
GMAT 690, GPA 3.34
Harvard | Mr. Nonprofit Social Entrepreneur
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
Harvard | Mr. Merchant Of Debt
GMAT 760, GPA 3.5 / 4.0 in Master 1 / 4.0 in Master 2
Harvard | Mr. Improve Healthcare
GMAT 730, GPA 2.8
NYU Stern | Mr. Low Gmat
GMAT 690, GPA 73.45 % (No GPA in undergrad)
Darden | Mr. Indian Telecom ENG
GRE 340, GPA 3.56
Tuck | Ms. Nigerian Footwear
GRE None, GPA 4.5
Stanford GSB | Mr. Low GPA To Stanford
GMAT 770, GPA 2.7
Berkeley Haas | Mr. 360 Consultant
GMAT 720, GPA 3.4
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Low GPA High GRE
GRE 325, GPA 3.2
Darden | Mr. Senior Energy Engineer
GMAT 710, GPA 2.5
Duke Fuqua | Ms. Health Care Executive
GMAT 690, GPA 3.3
Chicago Booth | Mr. Finance Musician
GRE 330, GPA 3.6
NYU Stern | Mr. Hail Mary 740
GMAT 740, GPA 2.94
Harvard | Mr. London Artist
GMAT 730, GPA First Class Honours (4.0 equivalent)
Harvard | Mr. Professional Boy Scout
GMAT 660, GPA 3.83
SDA Bocconi | Mr. Pharma Manager
GMAT 650, GPA 3,2
N U Singapore | Ms. Biomanager
GMAT 520, GPA 2.8
Kellogg | Mr. Young PM
GMAT 710, GPA 9.64/10
Wharton | Mr. Indian VC
GRE 333, GPA 3.61
MIT Sloan | Mr. Tech Enthusiast
GRE 325, GPA 6.61/10
Harvard | Mr. Midwest Dreamer
GMAT 760, GPA 3.3
Foster School of Business | Ms. Diamond Dealer
GRE 308, GPA Merit
NYU Stern | Mr. Low Undergraduate GPA
GMAT 720 (Expected), GPA 2.49
Stanford GSB | Ms. Try Something New
GMAT 740, GPA 3.86
Darden | Mr. Military Missile Defense
GRE 317, GPA 3.26

New Book: How MBAs Can Excel on Wall Street

Meade presenting at a school

Here are summaries of three chapters from Meade’s book, Wisdom on the Way to Wall Street: 22 Steps to Navigating Your Road to Success.

Chapter 5: Dare to Take Risks 
Taking risks is a necessary part of obtaining success. We know that being comfortable or complacent can negatively affect your growth. You have to dare to take risks but don’t just take the first step, take a leap of faith in all that you do.  In your leap of faith, there will be unexpected obstacles thrown your way. The more risks you take the more adaptable you are to certain situations because you have developed experience. If you’re not willing to risk the usual you’ll have to settle for the ordinary. A risk can come in many forms.  You could be offered an opportunity in the form of a new job or higher education that would require you to move across the country leaving your parents and friends. A risk-averse person would turn down the offer and possibly the chance to advance themselves and learn new experiences along the way.  A person who looks risks in the face and doesn’t let fear conquer them would lean into the experiences that have the potential for greater reward and growth potential. As hard as it may be, don’t be afraid to take a risk that will challenge you to grow.
One difficult thing about taking risks is the uncertainty that comes along with it. For example, when applying for new career opportunities it’s vital to apply to roles where you have at least two out of three of the main requirements. My background is in sales, risk, finance, and analytics however I would not let that stop me from applying to a marketing role that involves reviewing the marketing materials from an analytical perspective for finance companies.  While some may consider it risky, I wouldn’t stop myself from using the skills I do have to explore an opportunity where I can adapt and learn something new.  As you take risks it’ll be uncomfortable at times but as a leader, you have to tap into that feeling of discomfort and use it as your fuel towards realizing your full potential.  Either you can dare to take risks or risk living a life of mediocrity.
Chapter 7: Your Elevation May Require Isolation
It’s always good to have supporters in your corner.  For example, a boxer has a coach or trainer serving as a cornerman.  This person provides assistance, motivation, and encouragement.  However, when the bell rings and the new round begins, the fighter must leave their cornerman and face the opponent on their own.  This same scenario applies to how we face challenges in life.  Sometimes your elevation may require isolation from family members and friends.  As you progress, there may be obstacles that you have to face in isolation.  Think about it like coin currency, specifically the comparison of a nickel to a dime. A dime is much smaller in size compared to a nickel. However, a dime holds more value than the nickel. Your relationships should be viewed in the same light as the quantity of people you surround yourself with does not equate to the value that they are bringing to your life.  The most important thing you can do on your road to expansion is to protect your energy. If you do that well, you will attract positivity and negate negativity. When you’re working in your quiet space and focusing on leveling up, everyone doesn’t need to know what your next move is going to be. Focus on the task at hand and let the results be your noise. Outside opinions are not necessary when you are working in your own lane and trying to elevate. When you’re in the space of growth, creativity and innovation it’s best to work more and talk less. You’ll get more done focusing on and mastering your craft and gain a clearer vision on what you want to manifest.
Chapter 10: Rebound To Foster Resilience 
Nothing is more frustrating than when you are driving to a destination and you continuously run into red lights along the way. You’re sitting behind the steering wheel and as the next intersection approaches you’re anxious for a long-awaited green light. Similarly, I have run into many red lights while pursuing my aspirations and have been told “no” so many times whether applying to opportunities or trying new things. You may be told no or turned down for an opportunity but you owe it to yourself to never give up. A “no” today can be a “yes” tomorrow.
You have to accept the fact that at times, you will be turned down. People may not initially believe in your idea but if you continue to believe in yourself and work hard, they will eventually see your vision unfold. Don’t get held up by what people say or think. I turn rejection into my motivation to keep propelling forward. The brightest ideas can emerge from the darkest places. As you’re being told no or rejected, bounce back even stronger. Sometimes being told “no” can be a blessing in disguise for something far greater to come in the future. Make sure to outlast the rejection because your ability to be triumphant does not diminish based on how others view you.

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