Duke Fuqua | Mr. O&G Geoscientist
GRE 327, GPA 2.9
Kenan-Flagler | Ms. Big Pharma
GRE 318, GPA 3.3
Chicago Booth | Mr. Indian O&G EPC
GMAT 730, GPA 3.75
Wharton | Ms. Product Manager
GMAT 730, GPA 3.4
Kellogg | Mr. Indian Globetrotter
GMAT 750, GPA 4.0
Berkeley Haas | Ms. Jill Of All Trades
GRE 314, GPA 3.36
Berkeley Haas | Ms. Midwest Startup
GRE 328, GPA 3.51
Stanford GSB | Mr. S.N. Bose Scholar
GMAT 770, GPA 3.84
Wharton | Mr. Big 4
GMAT 770, GPA 8/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. MBB
GMAT 740, GPA 3.95
Wharton | Mr. Swing Big
GRE N/A, GPA 3.1
Stanford GSB | Mr. Big Brother
GRE 329, GPA 3.2
Harvard | Mr. Low GPA Product Manager
GMAT 780, GPA 3.1
Kenan-Flagler | Ms. Nonprofit Admin
GMAT 620, GPA 3.3
Kenan-Flagler | Mr. Top Three
GRE 310, GPA 2.7
Ross | Mr. NCAA to MBB
GMAT 710, GPA 3.2
Kellogg | Mr. 770 Dreamer
GMAT 770, GPA 8.77/10
Tepper | Mr. Tech Strategist
GRE 313, GPA 3.0
Stanford GSB | Mr. JD To MBA
GRE 326, GPA 3.01
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Musician To Consultant
GMAT 710, GPA 1.6
Harvard | Mr. Bangladeshi Analyst
GMAT 690, GPA 3.31
MIT Sloan | Mr. Generic Nerd
GMAT 720, GPA 3.72
Darden | Mr. Military Vet
GMAT 680, GPA 3.5
Duke Fuqua | Ms. ELS
GRE 318, GPA 3.8
Wharton | Mr. Investment Banking
GMAT 750, GPA 3.1
MIT Sloan | Mr. International Impact
GRE 326, GPA 3.5
Chicago Booth | Mr. US Army Veteran
GMAT 710, GPA 3.7

Is Carlson As Good As Ross or Haas? Sri Zaheer Thinks So

If Dean Sri Zaheer could wave a magic wand to improve the standing of the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota, what would she wish for?

To have the Carlson School mentioned in the same breath as two of the best business schools at public universities in the world: the University of Michigan’s Ross School and UC-Berkeley’s Haas School of Business.

“We’re just as good or better than they are,” she insists, ticking off a list of attributes to make her case.

  • A highly admired faculty with superstars in such core areas as marketing, strategy, organizational behavior, and social media.
  • An impressive slate of corporate recruiters who have helped Carlson post job placement rates that exceed most of the very best business schools in the past two years.
  • An intimate student culture where classes are small and MBA candidates know each other and the faculty by first name.
  • A loyal alumni network with senior executives who have climbed to visible positions at Deloitte, 3M, Target, UnitedHealth Group, Toro, Polaris, and Medtronic.

“Our student outcomes are great,” says Zaheer, a 58-year-old dynamo of a dean. “We’re hands-on and high touch. What we offer our full-time MBA students is a boutique educational experience, customized to their individual needs. All the students know each other by their first names. They get attention.”

LAST YEAR 97% OF CARLSON GRADS HAD JOB OFFERS THREE MONTHS AFTER GRADUATION

Last year, Carlson matched such schools as Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, Harvard Business School, and Columbia Business School for the best placement record three months after graduation (see MBA Jobs Back For Class of 2011). Some 97% of Carlson’s MBAs had job offers in hand 90 days after receiving their degrees.

The 3% “unemployment rate” was five times better than Ross, where 15% of the class still failed to land a job offer three months after graduation, and nearly three times better than Berkeley, where 8% were without offers.

What’s more, Carlson’s MBAs reported average salary and bonus of $115,988 last year—impressive for a school in Minneapolis and comparable to Michigan’s $130,688 or Berkeley’s $136,576 after the difference in cost-of-living is factored into the numbers. Though all the data is not yet in, Zaheer says Carlson’s Class of 2012 has fared just as well if not better. Starting salaries for this year’s graduating MBA class were up $5,000.

Zaheer, who came to Carlson 20 years ago as an assistant professor after completing her PhD in international management at MIT’s Sloan School, was drafted to be interim dean in 2011 when Alison Davis-Blake departed for Michigan’s Ross School. After a nine-month stint as interim boss, the school named her dean in March of 2012.

Her main challenge has to do with her magic wand wish. It is to overcome a perception that the school is merely regional player. “We want to make sure we get recognized for what we are,” she says. “Our location is a blessing and a curse. We have these amazing relationships with Fortune 500 companies that are in our backyard, but our location is a challenge because we have to change the perception that we are a local or regional school.”

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.