GMAT Versus GRE: Don’t Stick A Fork In The GMAT Just Yet

Graphic courtesy of AtlanticGMAT.com

THE CHOICE OF TESTS DIFFERS BY MBA APPLICANT TYPE

Another respondent to MBA Crystal Ball’s poll says the respective tests appeal to different types of applicant.

“The GRE is biased in favor of people with qualitative/social sciences backgrounds,” says Andrew Foley, a graduate business education aspirant in the U.S., “and the GMAT privileges more quantitatively-oriented applicants. I also think we need both types of thinkers in business schools and in top management positions afterward: management is a messy business of numbers AND people, after all. Accepting both tests helps ensure that we have paths for each type of applicant!”

Sameer Kamat, MBA Crystal Ball’s founder, says it’s clear that the GMAT is not ready to concede its market dominance just yet. But he adds that circumstances might lead to a third scenario: More schools going test-optional, and both tests losing favor.

“For the time being, GRE probably has a little more work to do before it can overtake GMAT,” he says. “While both these biggies fight for dominance in the ring, there’s also the possibility that many more B-schools might pull the rug from under their feet by making their test-optional policy permanent or offering score waivers.”

DON’T MISS: GRE SCORES AT THE TOP 50 MBA PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. or IN A GMAT-OPTIONAL WORLD, AVERAGE SCORES PLUMMET AT THE TOP 50 SCHOOLS