MIT Sloan | Mr. Refinery Engineer
GMAT 700- will retake, GPA 3.87
Yale | Ms. Social Impact AKS
GRE 315, GPA 7.56
Harvard | Mr. Political Consultant
GRE 337, GPA 3.85
Stanford GSB | Mr. Singing Banking Lawyer
GMAT 720, GPA 110-point scale. Got 110/110 with honors
Berkeley Haas | Ms. 10 Years Experience
GMAT To be taken, GPA 3.1
Said Business School | Mr. Across The Pond
GMAT 680, GPA 2.8
Yale | Mr. Army Infantry Officer
GMAT 730, GPA 2.83
Wharton | Mr. Army & Consulting
GMAT 760, GPA 4.0
Berkeley Haas | Mr. 360 Consultant
GMAT 720, GPA 3.4
N U Singapore | Ms. Biomanager
GMAT 520, GPA 2.8
MIT Sloan | Mr. Low GPA Over Achiever
GMAT 700, GPA 2.5
Stanford GSB | Mr. Corp Finance
GMAT 740, GPA 3.75
Harvard | Mr. Improve Healthcare
GMAT 730, GPA 2.8
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Wake Up & Grind
GMAT 700, GPA 3.5
Darden | Mr. Fintech Nerd
GMAT 740, GPA 7.7/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Minority Champ
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
Darden | Mr. Senior Energy Engineer
GMAT 710, GPA 2.5
Harvard | Mr. Merchant Of Debt
GMAT 760, GPA 3.5 / 4.0 in Master 1 / 4.0 in Master 2
Stanford GSB | Mr. Indian Telecom ENG
GRE 340, GPA 3.56
Stanford GSB | Ms. East Africa Specialist
GMAT 690, GPA 3.34
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Hanging By A Thread
GMAT 710, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Mr. Nonprofit Social Entrepreneur
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
Chicago Booth | Ms. Start-Up Entrepreneur
GRE 318 current; 324 intended, GPA 3.4
Duke Fuqua | Ms. Health Care Executive
GMAT 690, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Mr. Professional Boy Scout
GMAT 660, GPA 3.83
IU Kelley | Mr. Construction Manager
GRE 680, GPA 3.02
IU Kelley | Mr. Clinical Trial Ops
GMAT Waived, GPA 3.33

What Companies Are Paying MBAs This Year

The corporate recruiters who hire boatloads of MBAs expect to pay this year’s graduating class slightly less than they did last year. Median starting salaries for MBAs in the U.S. is expected to fall by $2,000 to $90,000, according to a study of corporate recruiters by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) published today (May 21).

GMAC said such slight declines are not uncommon in post-recession years, though it brings median salaries back to their 2008 level. Indeed, in four of of the five last years, median starting salary has been exactly $90,000.  Even so, GMAC said that salary data reported by full-time two-year MBA graduates in 2012 with job offers showed an 81% increase in salary in 2012 compared with their pre-degree jobs.

GMAC attempted to spin the decline in a positive light, noting that employers continue to offer MBA new hires a significantly higher median salary when compared with new hires with bachelor’s degrees. “This premium has remained in the $40,000 range for the last five years of available data, the study found.

These figures exclude signing and performance bonuses that companies offer in addition to base salaries. In the United States, where 46% of companies offer their starting MBA hires a signing bonus, the median signing bonus for those candidates is $15,000, which matches the signing bonus offered to MBA hires in 2011.

Expected Median Starting Salary for Newly Hired MBAs At U.S. Companies

In 2012, 48% of survey respondents plan to increase MBA starting salaries in comparison to last year; a closer look reveals some nuanced results, however. The 2012 Corporate Recruiters Survey asked respondents to estimate the direction of change in base salaries for recent business hires, taking inflation into account. Globally, 13 percent of companies plan to increase MBA starting salaries above the rate of inflation and 35 percent plan to increase pay at the rate of inflation. But half (50%) of participating companies plan to keep MBA starting salaries at 2011 levels without adjusting for inflation. Similar findings are seen across all degree types and geographic regions.

While these companies are not reducing the base salaries they offer new hires, the net result of stable salaries is slightly weakened purchasing power. These results are not surprising given the sluggish nature of the current economic recovery: Many countries, including Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States, report that wages are struggling to keep up with inflation for most employees.

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.