Kellogg | Mr. Multinational Strategy
GRE 305, GPA 3.80
MIT Sloan | Mr. Semiconductor Engineer
GMAT 750, GPA 3.68
Stanford GSB | Mr. 750
GMAT 750, GPA 3.43
Columbia | Ms. Cybersecurity
GRE 322, GPA 3.7
Wharton | Mr. Global Perspective
GMAT 750, GPA 3.6
Harvard | Ms. JMZ
GMAT 750, GPA 3.47
Harvard | Mr. Bangladeshi Analyst
GMAT 690, GPA 3.31
MIT Sloan | Mr. International Impact
GRE 326, GPA 3.5
IU Kelley | Mr. Businessman Engineer
GMAT 690, GPA 7.26/10
MIT Sloan | Mr. Surgery to MBB
GMAT 750, GPA 3.4
Ross | Mr. NCAA to MBB
GMAT 710, GPA 3.2
Duke Fuqua | Mr. National Security Advisor
GMAT 670, GPA 3.3
Darden | Ms. Teaching-To-Tech
GRE 326, GPA 3.47
Wharton | Mr. Data Scientist
GMAT 740, GPA 7.76/10
IU Kelley | Ms. Marketing Manager
GRE 294, GPA 2.5
McCombs School of Business | Mr. Consulting Analyst
GMAT 700, GPA 7.7/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. FinTech Engineer
GMAT 760, GPA 3.8
MIT Sloan | Mr. Hopeful CXO
GMAT 750, GPA 3.56
Stanford GSB | Mr. Deferred MBA
GMAT 760, GPA 3.82
SDA Bocconi | Mr. Hotel International
GMAT 570, GPA 2.8
Harvard | Mr. Renewable Energy Investing
GMAT 740, GPA 4.0
Foster School of Business | Mr. CPG Tech
GMAT 770, GPA 2.9
Berkeley Haas | Ms. Midwest Startup
GRE 328, GPA 3.51
Yale | Mr. Fencer
GMAT 740, GPA 3.48
INSEAD | Mr. Indian In Cambodia
GMAT 730, GPA 3.33
Tuck | Mr. South African FinTech
GMAT 730, GPA 3.08
London Business School | Mr. Indian Electric Tech
GMAT 620, GPA 3.5

Women MBAs: Change Will Be Slow

SOME LEADING BUSINESS SCHOOLS HAVE SIGNIFICANTLY BOOSTED FEMALE MBA ENROLLMENT

For years, business schools have struggled to increase enrollment of women in MBA programs. Typically, women constitute little more than a third of the enrolled students in many leading full-time MBA programs compared to nearly half in both law and med schools. But a few schools have made significant progress in admitting larger percentage of women in recent years.

Some 50 years after women were first admitted to its full-time MBA program, Harvard Business School welcomed an unprecedented number of women to its Class of 2014: some 40% of the incoming 925 MBA students, up from the previous year’s record 39% and the total of 36% in the Class of 2012. The latest entering class at Wharton is composed of 42% women. At Darden, women make up only 30% of the Class of 2015.

Bruner says that convincing more women to go to business school would benefit everyone. “Increasing the representation of women in business school programs would enhance the educational experience of both men and women,” he wrote. “Achieving this is constrained by the small numbers and proportion of women seeking education in business. Therefore a priority should be to increase the pool of qualified applicants.”

HOW TO GET MORE WOMEN TO GO TO BUSINESS SCHOOL

He spelled out a list of actions he believes are necessary to get more women in the pipeline:

▪Improve K-12 education to promote entry into, and graduation from, undergraduate programs.

▪Intensify outreach from undergraduate and graduate business schools to undergraduate students.

▪Expand public and private financial aid for women students.

▪Promote programs that help undergraduate women transition into business careers. These include short certificate programs and one-year “Masters in Management” programs to be taken immediately after undergraduate school.

▪Relax H1-B visa requirements for international women seeking to work in the U.S. upon graduation from MBA programs.

“Our experience at Darden shows that even modest increases in the enrollment of women can have a transformational impact on the character and culture of the educational program,” Bruner added. “Greater representation of women in classrooms, learning teams, and project groups changes the conversation: richer, more diverse, and greater respect for differences. Students (women and men) report higher levels of satisfaction with the learning experience. Faculty report better classroom and team results. And corporate recruiters report greater satisfaction with the pool of talent they encounter. The experience at Darden is confirmed by empirical research elsewhere, some of which was offered as background reading to this meeting.”

DON’T MISS: THE MBA MOMMY TRACK: THE TRUE COST OF HAVING A BABY OR B-SCHOOL DEANS’ WHITE HOUSE POW-WOW

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.