Chicago Booth | Mr. Community Uplift
GMAT 780, GPA 2.6
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Angel Investor
GMAT 700, GPA 3.20
Stanford GSB | Mr. Equal Opportunity
GMAT 760, GPA 4.0
Rice Jones | Mr. ToastMasters Treasurer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7
Kellogg | Mr. MBB Private Equity
GMAT TBD (target 720+), GPA 4.0
Said Business School | Ms. Creative Planner
GMAT 690, GPA 3.81 / 5.0
Wharton | Mr. MBB to PE
GMAT 740, GPA 3.98
Harvard | Mr. Soldier Boy
GMAT 720, GPA 3.72
Stanford GSB | Mr. Wedding Music Business
GMAT 710, GPA 3.7
Harvard | Mr. Big 4 Auditor
GMAT 740, GPA 3.55
Harvard | Mr. Software PE
GMAT 760, GPA 3.45
Harvard | Mr. First Gen Consultant
GMAT 710, GPA 4.0 (First Class Honours)
Stanford GSB | Mr. Classic Candidate
GMAT 760, GPA 3.9
Stanford GSB | Mr. MBB/FinTech
GMAT 760, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Mr. Break Into Buy-Side
GMAT 780, GPA 3.6
Wharton | Mr. LatAm Indian Trader
GMAT 720, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Perseverance
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Mr. Politics Abroad
GRE 332, GPA 4.2/4.3
MIT Sloan | Mr. Canadian Banker
GMAT 720, GPA 3.7
Darden | Mr. Stock Up
GMAT 700, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Ms. Fintech To Tech
GMAT 740, GPA 3.54
Harvard | Ms. Finance
GMAT 760, GPA 3.48
Stanford GSB | Mr. Unrealistic Ambitions
GMAT 710, GPA 2.0
Kellogg | Mr. Kellogg 1Y
GMAT 710, GPA 3.58
Stanford GSB | Ms. CPA To MBA
GMAT 710, GPA 3.9
Harvard | Mr. Aspiring Elected Official
GMAT 670, GPA 3.8
Ross | Mr. LGBTQ PM
GMAT 710, GPA 3.91

Samples Of Successful Harvard Business School Essays

helping others

The Giver

 

What else would I like you to know?

I am who I am today mostly because of my brother. (NAME) was born when I was four years old, and he had an extremely rare birth defect called Robert’s Syndrome. At the time, he was one of a handful in the world to have it. He was born without arms, couldn’t walk or talk, and had many other severe physical and mental defects. It was a complete shock to my parents. He was only expected to live for a day or two, but after a few weeks in the hospital he was healthy enough to come home with us. I was too young to really understand what was going on; I was just excited to have a brother.

(Name) was a full-time job for us. For his entire life, he was incapable of doing anything for himself. My parents and I didn’t have much, but we did have an amazing family and group of friends to support us. We couldn’t have taken care of (Name) without all of them, and seeing this level of sacrifice from so many people had a huge impact on me. No one ever complained. No one ever hesitated. We just did what we had to do, and I saw first-hand at a young age how important it is to work together and help those around you. And our family (extended included), became so much closer because of how we came together for (Name), and that closeness still holds true today.

(Name) ended up living for about four years, and I’m so grateful for the lessons I learned from him. My generosity, kindness, team work, and independence, come directly from him being in my life. And learning to deal with that level of stress and responsibility made me a much, much stronger person than I would have been without.

So my family and I have carried (Name)’s memory with us since he passed in the form of giving to others. About ten years ago, we started a charity called (institution), whose purpose is to supply beds and bedding to children in our area who are without. The thought was that (Name) spent most of his life in bed, and if we hadn’t had a decent one for him his life would have been so uncomfortable. As of this year, we have supplied almost (number) kids with mattresses, blankets, and stuffed animals, and each year we are able to help more and more children.

The mentality of service has been a big part of my life since we started our charity, and as I got older I wanted to start branching out to new service opportunities. And let me tell you, (city) has been a great place to start. The city has made a serious impression on me. Anyone who’s from here either loves it or hates it, but either way, (city) is the kind of place that defines a person. (City) is the underdog, full of unrealized potential. Living in a place like this has opened my eyes to the heartache of missed opportunities (not even mentioning our sports teams…), and it’s because of this that I’ve become so involved in the community. I’ve been able to work with so many very smart, driven people, and together we’ve done a lot to make a positive impact. My work with the charity has allowed me to help raise over (number) for small, local NFPs, and my work with the (institution) has complemented that with a more hands-on, service based focus. And being a Big Brother through (institution) has allowed me to make a lasting, consistent impact in a more focused way.

All of these, together with working for a commercial bank, have given me a very satisfying life balance. I’m able to do so many things, and able to make a tangible impact in each of them. But sometimes I do so much that I don’t take the time to stop and look around—to process what’s happening. This was missing in my life. I know that the path I’d been taking was the right one for me, I’d just never truly felt ready to move on to the next phase.

This changed this past summer when I did my first (event). If you’re not familiar with this, it’s a (number) mile swim followed by a (number) mile bike and then a (number) mile run. Still seems nuts to me. I’d never done a triathlon of any kind before I signed up for this, but was so overwhelmed by watching my friend compete in the same one the year before. I’ll never forget the moment: I was watching a quadriplegic go up the final—and largest—hill in his wheelchair, sweating, grunting, and crying. And finishing. I’m pretty sure everyone watching that was crying; it was one of the most moving things I’d ever seen. So I signed up.

Training for this requires a serious amount of time, most of which you’re alone with your thoughts (no music allowed during the race, so you train without). Eight hours biking, five running, and two swimming, each week for seven months, is so mentally taxing, and your mind goes to some new places. I started reflecting a lot, and really began to understand the choices I’ve made and the impact they’ve had. I thought a lot about about where I was in life, why I was there, and what I would have done differently along the way. I thought about what I wanted for my future, not just career-wise, but in order to be happy. And it’s not so much that my views changed from this experience, but I feel like I’ve gained a new level of clarity. I’m much more confident in my life goals, and can pursue them with pride and conviction.

I’m not ready to move on to the next phase of my life, and am very excited to do so.

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.