Duke Fuqua | Mr. Digital Marketing Analyst
GMAT 710, GPA 3.27
Tuck | Ms. Green Biz
GRE 326, GPA 3.15
Cambridge Judge | Mr. Nuclear Manager
GMAT 700, GPA 2.4
London Business School | Ms. Aussie Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 3.5
Darden | Mr. Deloitte Dreamer
GMAT 700, GPA 3.13
Stanford GSB | Mr. Young Entrepreneur
GMAT 730, GPA 3.4
Stanford GSB | Ms. Retail Innovator
GMAT 750, GPA 3.84
Harvard | Mr. Double Whammy
GMAT 730, GPA 3.3
Kellogg | Mr. Geography Techie
GMAT 740, GPA 3.9
INSEAD | Mr. Media Startup
GMAT 710, GPA 3.65
Kellogg | Ms. Kellogg Bound Ideator
GMAT 710, GPA 2.4
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Emporio Armani
GMAT 780, GPA 3.03
Foster School of Business | Mr. Tesla Gigafactory
GMAT 720, GPA 3.0
Wharton | Ms. Female Engineer
GRE 323, GPA 3.5
Darden | Ms. Teaching-To-Tech
GRE 326, GPA 3.47
Stanford GSB | Mr. Financial Controller
GRE Yet to Take, Target is ~330, GPA 2.5
Kellogg | Mr. 770 Dreamer
GMAT 770, GPA 8.77/10
Ross | Ms. Middle Aged MBA-er
GRE 323, GPA 3.6
London Business School | Mr. Impact Financier
GMAT 750, GPA 7.35/10
Chicago Booth | Mr. PM to FinTech
GMAT 740, GPA 6/10
Ross | Mr. Operational Finance
GMAT 710, taking again, GPA 3
Kellogg | Mr. Texan Adventurer
GMAT 740, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Data & Strategy
GMAT 710 (estimate), GPA 3.4
MIT Sloan | Mr. Unicorn Strategy
GMAT 740 (estimated), GPA 3.7
Duke Fuqua | Mr. National Security Advisor
GMAT 670, GPA 3.3
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Tech Evangelist
GMAT 690, GPA 3.2
Duke Fuqua | Mr. 911 System
GMAT 690, GPA 3.02

Best Business Movies of 2015

Michael Fassbender as Steve Jobs

Michael Fassbender as Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs (85%): This three act character study was easily the most polarizing movie on this list. Critics hailed the spot-on acting and the touchingly dynamic relationship between Jobs and his daughter. For those who knew Jobs, the screenplay took liberties with events and only hinted at Jobs’ warmth and generosity.

For entertainment value, it’s hard to resist Michael Fassbender channeling a younger and more mercurial Jobs who preened at his bad boy best. This Jobs is a manipulative, spiteful, demanding, defiant iconoclast who rants, threatens, and blames without concern for the fallout. Here, Jobs is portrayed as an egomaniac, who hogs the credit as he bucks convention. He is difficult-to-bear and enigmatic, a complex man whose brilliance elicits a sense of awe, resentment, heartache, and resignation from those around him. Still, as we learned after his humbling hero’s journey through the NeXT wilderness, Jobs would soften with age and ultimately redeem himself with the greatest comeback in the annals of American business. Haunted in the film by Shakespearian ghosts like Steve Wozniak and Andy Hertzfield, Jobs eventually attempts to make amends to those he harmed. He even confesses that he is “poorly made” – perhaps not realizing his flawed Version I was still a marvel of engineering and design that came with the same set of bugs as everyone else.

The beauty of Steve Jobs is that it enables viewers to peak around the corner to see the obsessive nature, setbacks, and sacrifices behind greatness. Jobs was an inventor and entrepreneur – perhaps America’s best since Henry Ford. But he was also a deeply focused artist, whose problem-solving, take-no-prisoners sensibility drove him to create the future and not just dream it.

Concussion (62%): Looking for an underdog story? Forget Rocky and head out to see Concussion. Of course, you won’t find the heroism in Concussion in those gridiron gladiator battles. Instead, they’re found in labs, dinners, and boardrooms. In this film, you’ll find the most unlikely of heroes: Bennet Omalu, a kind-hearted Nigerian expat who works as a neuropathologist and even talks to the stiffs.

Will Smith as Bennet Omalu

Will Smith as Bennet Omalu

After discovering severe brain trauma to a former player during an autopsy, he co-authors a paper on his findings that repeated blows to the head in football produce long-term impairments like depression and mood disorders. Rather than his work being embraced, it is dismissed by the NFL and its partners. Omalu’s associates are smeared, while opponents demand their research be retracted. The pressure becomes so great that Omalu is forced to re-locate.

But, as Dr. Martin Luther King observes, “the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.” After a players union executive’s suicide note vindicates Omalu, the NFL is forced to concede the links between football and CTE (Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy).

For business students, Concussion is a sobering reminder that organizations don’t always look out for the best interests of their people. Truth is, when money and liability are involved, businesses react to whistleblowing by circling the wagons or lashing out. And that means cover-ups, threats, and dirty play. In the end, Concussion reflects the great paradox: Sticking your neck out may cost you a career, but it can also save your employer and spare suffering to others over the long run.