Wharton | Mr. Indian VC
GRE 333, GPA 3.61
MIT Sloan | Mr. Tech Enthusiast
GRE 325, GPA 6.61/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Low GPA To Stanford
GMAT 770, GPA 2.7
Harvard | Mr. Midwest Dreamer
GMAT 760, GPA 3.3
Kellogg | Mr. Young PM
GMAT 710, GPA 9.64/10
Foster School of Business | Ms. Diamond Dealer
GRE 308, GPA Merit
NYU Stern | Mr. Low Undergraduate GPA
GMAT 720 (Expected), GPA 2.49
Stanford GSB | Ms. Try Something New
GMAT 740, GPA 3.86
Darden | Mr. Military Missile Defense
GRE 317, GPA 3.26
Wharton | Mr. Army Bahasa
GRE 312, GPA 3.57
Harvard | Mr. Consulting To Public Service
GMAT 750, GPA 3.7
Wharton | Mr. Strategy To Real Estate
GMAT 750, GPA 3.9
Stanford GSB | Ms. Standard Consultant
GMAT 750, GPA 3.46
Harvard | Mr. 1st Gen Brazilian LGBT
GMAT 720, GPA 3.2
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Hanging By A Thread
GMAT 710, GPA 3.8
NYU Stern | Mr. Customer Success
GMAT 710, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Mr. Industrial Goods To MBB
GMAT 650, GPA 3.35
Stanford GSB | Mr. Family Biz From Chile
GMAT 710, GPA 5.5/7.0 (Ranked 6 out of 181 of class)
Tuck | Mr. Military Communications Officer
GRE 320, GPA 3.45
Harvard | Dr. Harvard Biotech
GRE 322, GPA 4.0
Harvard | Ms. Global Connector
GMAT 750, GPA 3.8
London Business School | Ms. Tech Researcher
GRE 331, GPA 3.17
Kellogg | Mr. Nigerian Engineer
GRE 310, GPA 3.5/5.0
Harvard | Ms. Indian Business Analyst
GMAT 740, GPA 3.5
UCLA Anderson | Mr. National Table Tennis
GMAT 720, GPA 4
INSEAD | Mr. Petroleum Engineer
GMAT 690, GPA 3.46
Georgetown McDonough | Mr. Aspiring Consultant
GMAT 690, GPA 3.68

Stanford Graduate School of Business

MBA students at Stanford’s new $350 million Knight Management Center

1. Stanford University

Stanford Graduate School of Business 

655 Knight Way

Stanford, CA 94305

Admissions: 650-723-2766

Email: http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/programs/mba/contact/ask-question

Website: http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/mba

Apply Online: https://app.applyyourself.com/AYApplicantLogin/fl_ApplicantConnectLogin.asp?id=SU-MBA

Admission Deadlines for Class of 2017:

Round One: 10/1/2014

Round Two: 1/7/2015

Round Three: 4/1/2015

At a time when one school after another is adding faculty and centers to support entrepreneurship, this was clearly Stanford’s year. With applications up 3.5% this past year, the school continues to boast the most highly selective MBA program in the U.S., accepting only 6.5% of its applicants. Stanford MBAs typically land among the highest first-year pay packages in the world. And MBA startups at Stanford have been at record levels in the past two years, making the school <em>the</em> place to incubate a business from scratch, search for capital from angel investors and VCs, and launch. This year, roughly 17% of the graduating MBAs—exactly 65 students—went the startup route. That’s about the same as last year when a record 18% chose to start new firms.

In fact, the startup mindset has become so dominant at the school that the dean of its MBA program now believes Stanford should try to somewhat discourage it. “From our standpoint, we don’t need to sell entrepreneurship here because we get it for free,” says Madhav Rajan, senior associate dean for academic affairs. He believes that the school’s location–in the heart of Silicon Valley–allows it to have a near hands-off approach to entrepreneurship because the startup bug strikes naturally given the surrounding ecosystem of angel investors, VC firms, and company founders.

“Students will automatically think Stanford is entrepreneurship,” he adds. “We don’t need to sell anybody on it. If anything, this is a trend we have to push against more than embrace. We have a completely different problem than anybody else. We don’t want to be the graduate school of entrepreneurship. We are a school of general management.”

Stanford’s latest incoming crop of MBAs is the largest class in the school’s history with record percentages of both female and international students. Out of a class of 410 newbies (vs. 406 last year), 42% are women, up six full percentage points from last year’s 36%, while 44% are from outside the U.S., up three percentage points from 41% last year. The international contingent at Stanford hails from 62 different countries, an all-time high. The average GMAT score for the class is also the highest of any U.S. business school yet again: 732.

The school’s goal is ambitious: to only accept students who, in Dean Garth Saloner’s words, “have the leadership capacity to change the world.” The tagline of the school? “Change Lives, Change Organizations, Change the World.” This lofty mission is taken seriously by the admissions staff, which sorts through more than 7,000 applications from top-tier candidates.

Stanford GSB opened a $345 million world-class campus in 2011. The complex gives Stanford’s B-School some 360,000 square feet of space, roughly 30% more than it had in its previous location. There are now 13 tiered classrooms, 20 flat-floored classrooms, and 70 breakout and study rooms. The larger number of breakout rooms, in particular, will help the school to more effectively deliver a curriculum that emphasizes smaller seminar-style courses. A 600-seat auditorium replaces the previous 324-seat model. There are also eight 16-person seminar rooms to allow for more intimate instruction, eight showers for MBA students, and an 870-car parking structure–a big selling point on a campus where parking was always an ordeal.

Completely gone are the windowless classrooms in the B-school’s former blocky building, which was put up in 1966. With the exception of a behavioral lab, all the classrooms now have natural light.

Stanford isn’t cheap. In fact, in 2014, only one MBA program was more expensive: New York University’s Stern School of Business. For a single person living on campus, Stanford said the cost of its MBA is now $202,870, a sum that includes a $4,000 global immersion trip. That’s only about $1,000 less than NYU. But if a student lives off-campus, Stanford estimates the total cost to be $212,092, with the required trip overseas.

Most business schools are aggressively increasing their scholarship support of students to help defray the escalating costs of tuition and fees. Stanford says that tuition has gone up by 16% in the past five years, but the pool of money available for scholarships has risen 80% to $15.7 million from $8.7 million. Stanford’s average student fellowship grant this year is $35,830, higher than any other business school.

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.