How NOT To Mess Up Your HBS Interview

If you are thinking of Paris or New York and are REALLY worried about this (more so than is normal) it might be worth coming to campus. Otherwise, chances are, you will get a reg. adcom anyway, or a lively ringer whom you enjoy, etc.

At that point it becomes more important to think about time, expense, and how tired and stressful the trip will be. There is something to be said, if you live near Paris or London or New York, to just doing it, and POOF, it is over by lunch, not a 4-day, 3-TSA frisk, flight and taxi-rumble to Boston. With the real possibility of snow storms.

You’re obviously doing a good number of mock interviews right now. What most bothers you about the whole process?

What upsets me are good people who have a bad hair day. The call I fear is from the person crying on Amtrak. They had their interview at HBS. They are on their way home on the train to New York, and they call in tears because they think they have blown their interview. If you think you’ve blown your interview at Harvard, you probably have blown it. Those are real sad calls, especially if you like the person, and they rehearse how they lost a step, then another and then tripped. If you could have prevented the first lost step, they would be in at Harvard. That happens, man, trust me. That happens. Years of work and hours of preparation and poof, it’s gone, because they could not explain why they went to Cornell for college in 30 concise seconds.

For more admissions advice from Sandy Kreisberg, also see “ The World, According to Sandy.”

DON’T MISS: THE GATEKEEPER TO HAVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL or LOVE, SEX & MONEY: A REVEALING PORTRAIT OF A HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL CLASS

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.