Chicago Booth | Ms. Indian Banker
GMAT 740, GPA 9.18/10
Kellogg | Ms. Big4 M&A
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Mr. Army Engineer
GRE 326, GPA 3.89
Chicago Booth | Mr. Healthcare PM
GMAT 730, GPA 2.8
Harvard | Mr. African Energy
GMAT 750, GPA 3.4
Columbia | Mr. Energy Italian
GMAT 700, GPA 3.5
UCLA Anderson | Mr. SME Consulting
GMAT 740, GPA 3.55 (as per WES paid service)
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Quality Assurance
GMAT 770, GPA 3.6
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Salesman
GMAT 700, GPA 3.0
INSEAD | Mr. INSEAD Aspirant
GRE 322, GPA 3.5
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Army Aviator
GRE 314, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Mr. Renewables Athlete
GMAT 710 (1st take), GPA 3.63
Harvard | Mr. Healthcare PE
GRE 340, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Military Quant
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
Wharton | Mr. Future Non-Profit
GMAT 720, GPA 8/10
Kellogg | Mr. Concrete Angel
GRE 318, GPA 3.33
Kellogg | Mr. Maximum Impact
GMAT Waiver, GPA 3.77
MIT Sloan | Ms. Rocket Engineer
GMAT 710, GPA 3.9
Wharton | Ms. Interstellar Thinker
GMAT 740, GPA 7.6/10
Harvard | Mr. Finance
GMAT 750, GPA 3.0
Harvard | Mr. Defense Engineer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
Kellogg | Ms. Sustainable Development
GRE N/A, GPA 3.4
Chicago Booth | Mr. Unilever To MBB
GRE 308, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Ms. Female Sales Leader
GMAT 740 (target), GPA 3.45
Tuck | Mr. Liberal Arts Military
GMAT 680, GPA 2.9
Harvard | Ms. Gay Techie
GRE 332, GPA 3.88
INSEAD | Mr. Product Manager
GMAT 740, GPA 63%

10 Business Schools To Watch In 2016

Dartmouth College, Tuck School of Business

Dartmouth College, Tuck School of Business

Dartmouth College (Tuck): Like Darden, Tuck is replacing a rock star dean with Matthew Slaughter, an associate dean who also served a two-year stint in George W. Bush’s Council of Economic Advisers. Like Beardsley, Slaughter steps into an enviable situation with a tight-knit culture and a world class faculty. Plus, he inherits an alumni fund raising apparatus with a participation rate over 70% (the highest of any business school). Not to mention, 2015 Tuck grads are earning the same starting base pay as Harvard and Wharton grads (and higher signing bonuses), making $146,020 in total starting pay on average. And that doesn’t include an eye-popping 99% three month placement grads for Tuck grads!

So what can Slaughter do for an encore? We’re about to find out in 2016. While Slaughter isn’t outlining grand plans or taunting any sacred cows, you can expect some fiddling around the edges. Like Darden – notice a theme – Tuck is requiring an experiential course (TuckGO)…with the school taking students overseas to complete their consulting engagement. The program is also looking at how it can sell its unique mission to a new generation of students who sometimes view it as a survivalist camp out in the boonies. Plus, its new mantra – ‘to prepare wise leaders to better the world’ – hints at great global engagement. The world may not come to Hanover, but you can expect Hanover to reach out even more to the world.

Wharton School

Wharton School

Wharton: Two years ago, MOOCs were supposedly a threat to wipe half of the MBA programs off the map. Today, they are harmless little certifications that give students a taste of what the big players offer. Now, Geoff Garrett, the new dean at Wharton, is making a high stakes bet on MOOCs. Last February, Wharton bundled four core courses into a specialization, replete with a capstone project. Since then, the school has developed 18 more MOOCs. By this time next year, Garrett intends to up the ante and launch another 25 MOOCs (along with accompanying specializations). Is this a blue light special on brand name education – or a way to take a commanding lead over competitors like Stanford, Booth, and Columbia that have been hesitant to enter the space? Is Wharton diluting its luxury brand – or positioning itself as the household name for online MBA courses? We may not know if this bet pays out in 12 months – but we’re looking forward to seeing the early returns.

 

CEIBS: These days, the economic action is out east – as in China, India, Mongolia, and Myanmar. And where there is action, you’re bound to find MBAs flocking there. If you’re looking to learn how to do business in Asia – particularly China – the gateway is CEIBS (China Europe International Business School).

CEIBS - Photo by Ethan Baron

CEIBS – Photo by Ethan Baron

Thanks to its performance, CEIBS is getting increasing attention from eastern and western students alike. It placed 4th in Forbes’ ranking of two-year international MBA programs, with 2010 graduates earning $129,000 – a five year gain of $72,400. The Financial Times ranked the school 11th in the world in 2015, up six spots over the previous year with the program earning its highest marks in students’ career progression over their pre-MBA status.

And CEIBS may not be what you’d expect. For one, the program has become a major player in entrepreneurship and sustainability. Classes are taught in English in this Shanghai-based school. It offers a middle ground between the case and the experiential methods. Best of all, it boasts several partnerships with both western companies based in China and Chinese companies looking to beef up their presence in the west. In other words, it offers something for everyone, particularly those looking to build a network and know-how out east. As China’s influence grows on the global stage, a program like CEIBS becomes all the more attractive to globally-attuned MBA candidates.

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