Duke Fuqua | Mr. Military MedTech
GRE 310, GPA 3.48
Stanford GSB | Mr. Latino Healthcare
GRE 310, GPA 3.4
Tuck | Mr. Product Marketer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.1
Wharton | Mr. Aspiring Leader
GMAT 750, GPA 3.38
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Advisory Consultant
GRE 330, GPA 2.25
Kellogg | Mr. Equity To IB
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
INSEAD | Mr. Marketing Master
GRE 316, GPA 3.8
Darden | Ms. Marketing Analyst
GMAT 710, GPA 3.75
Darden | Mr. Corporate Dev
GMAT Waived, GPA 3.8
Cornell Johnson | Mr. SAP SD Analyst
GMAT 660, GPA 3.60
Kellogg | Ms. Public School Teacher
GRE 325, GPA 3.93
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Army Officer
GRE 325, GPA 3.9
INSEAD | Mr. Future In FANG
GMAT 650, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Hedge Fund
GMAT 740, GPA 3.8
Stanford GSB | Mr. Deferred MBA
GMAT 760, GPA 3.82
Stanford GSB | Mr. Robotics
GMAT 730, GPA 2.9
Stanford GSB | Ms. Artistic Engineer
GMAT 730, GPA 9.49/10
Yale | Mr. Army Pilot
GMAT 650, GPA 2.90
Kellogg | Mr. Double Whammy
GMAT 730, GPA 7.1/10
INSEAD | Mr. Tesla Manager
GMAT 720, GPA 3.7
Darden | Mr. Tech To MBB
GMAT 710, GPA 2.4
INSEAD | Ms. Investment Officer
GMAT Not taken, GPA 16/20 (French scale)
McCombs School of Business | Mr. Startup Of You
GMAT 770, GPA 2.4
Kellogg | Mr. Hopeful Admit
GMAT Waived, GPA 4.0
UCLA Anderson | Mr. International PM
GMAT 730, GPA 2.3
Harvard | Mr. Policy Development
GMAT 740, GPA Top 30%
Ross | Mr. Brazilian Sales Guy
GRE 326, GPA 77/100 (USA Avg. 3.0)

Sample MBA Application Essays: A Really Bad Idea

I firmly believe that reading other people’s essays before writing your own is a huge, detrimental mistake. Here are three reasons why I never give my clients templates or sample application essays:

You need to find your own voice.

The essays are literally your only guaranteed opportunity to present your case, in your own words, and to stand out in the pool. Modeling your narrative after someone else’s story is an enormous waste of this opportunity. It also leads to generic, homogeneous essays that are totally forgettable, which will not get you in. Furthermore, it’s way too easy to subliminally copy someone else’s cadence, structure or phraseology, which can lead schools to suspect plagiarism.

You are reading the essays out of context.

When you read one of the many books about “successful” application essays you are reading them completely out of context. You have no idea if that applicant was a professional athlete, had special interest connections, a terrible GPA or work history, was applying to schools where she was significantly above the average or if she was admitted DESPITE her essays, not because of them. The bottom line is that you need to choose your topics and anecdotes strategically, in light of your whole candidacy. Just because these other candidates chose a certain topic or style does not mean that it is the optimal decision for you.

Formulas are dangerous.

I understand that it is very tempting to think that there is a magic formula that will get you into business school, and that this formula extends to the essays. Nevertheless, mimicking other people’s essays leads to less than genuine responses, and is an extremely dangerous way to approach your applications.

Instead of telling the schools what you think they want to hear, trust yourself, take the time to craft your own story and submit essays that truly represent your candidacy.


Karen has more than 12 years of experience evaluating candidates for admission to Dartmouth College and to the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth.  Since founding North Star Admissions Consulting in 2012, she has helped applicants gain admission to the nation’s top schools, including Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Wharton, MIT, Tuck, Columbia, Kellogg, Booth, Duke, Georgetown, Haas, Ross, NYU and more. Over the last three years, clients have been awarded more than 10.3 million dollars in scholarships, and more than 95% have gotten into one of their top choice schools.