A Professor’s Crusade Against Women-Only Programs & Awards

Participants in Yale School of Management’s Women In Leadership program

‘MALE FACULTY IN THE U.S. ARE COWARDLY, FECKLESS AND SPINELESS’

All told, his 239 formal complaints have resulted in exactly 100 investigations, with 30 cases resolved in his favor. In some cases, he says, administrators and faculty at other schools now contact him about possible Title IX violations, urging him to file complaints. “Everyone is so petrified and afraid to take a stand,” he reasons. “Male faculty in the U.S. has to be one of the most cowardly, feckless and spineless groups in America. Even with the protection of tenure, they are totally unwilling to stand up to illegal discrimination and illegal privilege for females that take place at almost every university.”

Not all of his efforts have been successful. Two years ago, Perry lodged a complaint with the Title IX office at the University of Virginia over eight MBA scholarship programs for women at the Darden School of Business along with the Forte Foundation Fellows program to encourage women to study for an MBA. “UVA argued that because the funding for the discriminatory, sex-specific, female-only (scholarships) was provided by the Darden Foundation and not UVA directly, they weren’t violating Title IX and they ignored my complaint,” says Perry. “What I found from experience is that working with Title IX officers and filing internal complaints was not productive.”

The fight over Darden’s scholarships continues, however, and has since been taken over by an organization that calls itself SAVE (Stop Abusive and Violent Environment) Services that has been called part of the “manosphere” of misogyny by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Perry says he has since focused his attention on female-only programs, while SAVE has specialized in filing Title IX complaints against female-only scholarships.

‘WE ARE STILL ACTING LIKE WE ARE BACK IN THE 1950s’

His crusade goes beyond exclusive initiatives for women, however. Through posts on his blog, Carpe Diem, Perry has called diversity officials at universities “diversicrats” and insists that it’s a complete myth that the gender wage gap is the result of discrimination. Pay disparities exist, he says, because among other things men work longer hours per week than women; they work in higher-risk and higher-paying positions, are more likely to invest in updating their skills with greater financial payoffs, and are less likely than women to be absent from work.

The professor acknowledges that many of the programs he is seeking to end were put in place years ago to encourage and support more women to help them break the glass ceiling in a wide range of fields. But Perry claims those efforts are no longer necessary and that they discriminate against men. “Men have been an under-represented minority in higher education for the past 40 years,” he claims. “Women have earned 14.4 million more college degrees men since 1982 when they became the majority gender for college degrees. It could be considered an insult to women that they need help or aid because they are doing so much better than men at most levels in higher education. We are still acting like we are back in the 1950s and 1960s when women were a minority. It is a form of social engineering.”

He argues that men are underrepresented in graduate school enrollment by a margin of 141 women for every 100 men and that men are underrepresented in seven out of 11 graduate fields of study at both the master’s and doctoral levels but get “no attention at all from feminists, gender activists, women’s centers, the media, universities, or anybody else in the higher education industry.”

SOMEBODY HAS TO STAND UP FOR THIS SO IT MIGHT AS WELL BE ME’

And what of the fewer women in such fields as business, computer science, and engineering. Perry has a ready retort. “Despite all of the brainwashing that has occurred,” he says, “there is no evidence these programs are working. The share of women earning engineering degrees is still about 20%. Even though some of these programs might have made sense in the 90s, women have now had so much success they have taken over many fields. Women are empowered and can enter any field they want. They are, in fact, getting all kinds of extra resources, programs, and funding that men are not getting. It’s hard to justify why women would need extra help when it is not available to men.”

While his less-than-politically-correct campaign has drawn surprisingly little resistance, Perry may be up against a tougher battle with business schools. That is because the programs he is trying to undo generate revenue and are widely seen as initiatives to help women achieve leadership positions in Corporate America, where they are underrepresented, and seats in corporate boardrooms, where they are still a distinct minority. “These programs are profitable and lucrative so it will depend on what they will do,” says Perry. “They may try to fight it. In that case, an investigation could go on for years.”

Perry says he has never felt discriminated against as a professor, with the sole exception of the faculty awards exclusively meant for women. He notes that men are more likely to commit suicide, more likely to be incarcerated, and have reduced life expectancies. “Men are a lot more at risk than women and yet all the attention is on women, women, women,” he says. “That is what I have noticed. It wasn’t personal and directed at me. But the whole atmosphere on college campuses is about helping women. Somebody has to stand up for this so it might as well be me.” 

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