Harvard | Mr. Sovereign Wealth Fund
GMAT 730, GPA 3.55
Harvard | Mr. Healthcare Fanatic
GMAT 770, GPA 3.46
Wharton | Mr. Marketing Director
GMAT 710, GPA 3.3
Ross | Mr. Airline Engineer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.73
Stanford GSB | Mr. Corporate VC Hustler
GMAT 780, GPA 3.17
Harvard | Mr. Smart Operations
GMAT 760, GPA 4.0
Darden | Mr. Strategy Manager
GRE 321, GPA 3.5
Ross | Ms. Healthcare Startup
GRE 321, GPA 3.51
Georgetown McDonough | Ms. Air Force
GMAT 610, GPA 3.8
Stanford GSB | Mr. JD To MBA
GRE 326, GPA 3.01
Harvard | Mr. MacGruber
GRE 313, GPA 3.7
Kellogg | Mr. Real Estate Finance
GMAT 710, GPA 3.0
Emory Goizueta | Mr. Multimedia
GRE 308, GPA 3.4
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Poet At Heart
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
Yale | Mr. Ukrainian Biz Man
GRE 310, GPA 4.75 out of 5
Darden | Mr. Former Scientist
GMAT 680, GPA 3.65
Stanford GSB | Mr. Sustainable Business
GRE 331, GPA 3.86
Wharton | Mr. Microsoft Consultant
GMAT N/A, GPA 2.31
Yale | Ms. Impact Investing
GRE 323, GPA 3.8
Cornell Johnson | Ms. Food Waste Warrior
GMAT Not written yet (around 680), GPA 3.27
Stanford GSB | Ms. Future Tech Exec
GMAT 750, GPA 3.4
Kellogg | Mr. Finance To Education
GMAT 730, GPA 3.4
Rice Jones | Mr. Back To School
GRE 315, GPA 3.0
Columbia | Mr. Aussie Military Man
GMAT 710, GPA 3.0 (rough conversion from Weighted Average Mark)
Harvard | Mr. Hopeful Philanthropist
GMAT 710, GPA 3.74
Stanford GSB | Mr. FinTech
GMAT Not Taken Yet, GPA 3.5
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Analytics Man
GMAT 740, GPA 3.1

Business Schools With The ‘Best Campus Environment’

UCLA's Anderson School is ranked 17th among the best business schools in the U.S. by Poets&Quants.

According to Princeton Review, UCLA’s Anderson School has the best campus environment of any business school in the world

The stated mission of the Black & Scholes Surf Club at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management is simply “to have fun surfing together and make some good friends with our classmates.” For beginners, club outings generally target “mellow long boarding waves.” For experienced surfers, club excursions are scheduled on “swell arrivals” aimed at providing MBA students “a chance to surf Southern California’s most renowned waves at their best.”

It’s just one of those less than obvious but real advantages to the MBA program at UCLA which it turns out is the business school with the “best campus environment” in the world, according to the Princeton Review.

Don’t laugh. While most MBA applicants aren’t likely to pick a school on the basis of its safety, attractiveness or location–the attributes Princeton Review measures on student surveys to pick business schools with the best campus environment–it just might matter to some–especially if you want to be less than half an hour from a beach. “it can be a fun in the sun school to some extent,” an MBA student at Anderson told the Review, “but I spend a whole lot more time with formulas and (financial) models than i do with the surfboard.”

Pepperdine University’s Graziadio School of Business & Management was one of six California schools to make the ‘best campus environment’ ranking.

Nonetheless, UCLA’s welcoming 419-acre campus, with its sculpture gardens, fountains, museums and proximity to Venice and Santa Monica beaches, has helped to give Anderson a first place ranking for the past five consecutive years. The business school complex is located on the original North Campus where many of the buildings are constructed of imported Italian brick. It’s a neighborhood where tourists are sold maps to help them discover the luxury homes of movie stars in Beverly Hills, Bel-Air, and Brentwood, the posh residential areas that border the campus. The weather doesn’t hurt, either. Just ask the students who stroll the campus in shorts and scandals during the winter and fall when their East Coast rivals are bundled up in heavy coats and gloves.

Every year, Princeton Review surveys MBA students at some 300 business schools and publishes a top ten list of the schools with the “best campus environment.” The Review ranks schools on the basis of student surveys that assess “the safety, attractiveness and location of the school,” though it does not reveal which questions on its survey are used for the ranking.

OUR ANALYSIS LOOKS AT THE PRINCETON REVIEW LISTS OVER THE PAST FIVE YEARS

Questions on three key elements of the ranking are among the 78 multiple-choice questions and seven “free-response” questions asked of current full-time students. Princeton Review says that at least 10% of full-time students responded “at almost all institutions we surveyed; at many schools, we scored responses from as many as one-third or one-half of the student body–and nearly all in a few cases.”

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.