Tuck | Mr. Product Marketer
GMAT 730, GPA 3.1
Wharton | Ms. Finance For Good
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Ms. Access To Opportunities
GRE 318, GPA 2.9
UCLA Anderson | Mr. International PM
GMAT 730, GPA 2.3
Stanford GSB | Mr. Low GPA To Stanford
GMAT 770, GPA 2.7
USC Marshall | Mr. Low GPA High GMAT
GMAT 740, GPA 2.44
London Business School | Mr. Midwest Engineer
GMAT 750, GPA 3.69
Harvard | Mr. Policy Development
GMAT 740, GPA Top 30%
Cambridge Judge Business School | Mr. Champion Swimmer
GMAT 750, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Mr. Future VC
GMAT 750, GPA 3.6
MIT Sloan | Mr. NFL Team Analyst
GMAT 720, GPA 3.8
Chicago Booth | Mr. Consulting Hopeful
GMAT 720, GPA 3.6
Kellogg | Mr. Tech Auditor
GRE 332, GPA 3.25
Wharton | Mr. Senior Analyst
GMAT 750, GPA 3.2
NYU Stern | Mr. Washed-Up Athlete
GRE 325, GPA 3.4
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Southern California
GMAT 710, GPA 3.58
Ross | Mr. Brazilian Sales Guy
GRE 326, GPA 77/100 (USA Avg. 3.0)
INSEAD | Mr. Fraud Associate
GMAT 750, GPA 8/10
Wharton | Ms. Project Mananger
GMAT 770, GPA 3.86
Chicago Booth | Mr. Average White Guy
GMAT 680, GPA 3.2
Stanford GSB | Mr. AIESEC Alumnus
GMAT 750, GPA 3.38
Kellogg | Mr. Brazilian Banker
GMAT 600, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Mr. Upward Trajectory
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
Kenan-Flagler | Mr. Fish
GRE 327, GPA 3.733
Harvard | Mr. Community Impact
GMAT 690, GPA 3.0
IMD | Mr. Gap Year To IMD
GMAT 660, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Italian In Tokyo
GMAT (710-740), GPA 4.0

Handicapping Your Business School Odds

Mr. Android

  • 750 GMAT (Q48, V44)
  • 3.8 GPA
  • Undergraduate degree in computer engineering from San Diego State
  • Work experience includes half a year at a large database company developing customer-facing software and two and one-half years as a software developer on device security at a major Android manufacturer
  • Extracurricular involvement is mainly a devotion to physical fitness
  • “I plan on looking for some extracurriculars related to business that I find interesting.”
  • Goal: To move into operations management
  • 23-year-old white male (will apply in two years when 25)

Odds of Success:

Stanford: 20% to 25%

Berkeley: 50+%

UCLA: 50+%

Columbia: 30% to 50%

MIT: 40+%

Sandy’s Analysis: You would be a solid applicant at Berkeley and MIT because they are not brand sluts the way Stanford is. They are stats sluts, so you are slutty in the right way: 750-3.8 is quite the va-va-voom figure for those boys. UCLA should take you on stats alone if you can convince them you want to go. Columbia is also a stats happy hooker, although why you want to go there is a mystery.

As for Stanford, your stats are still impressive even there, but you are on the wrong side of tracks (especially for a white boy), you need to develop a champion who can pull a string there, or else you just become another white guy from a boring, no-name company, with big stats. Boring work? Well, device security is boring to them.

Sure we all need it, but locksmiths aren’t getting in to Stanford either, unless they are female locksmiths who have invented devices to keep out male chauvinists –digital chastity belts? And your lack of even more mundane extras ain’t helping there.

“I plan on looking for some extra-curriculars related to business that I find interesting.”

Dude, you got that one backwards. You need to find some extracurrics that are NOT related to business. Stanford likes your full-time job to be Blue Chip and your extra-curriculars to be granola — if not kelp. You seem like a smart and sweet young guy. You need to find someone out there in Silicon Valley who can open the Stanford door for you. Look at it as a reverse-engineering security problem.

LAST WEEK’S COLUMN:  What Are Your Chances of Getting In

Handicapping Your MBA Odds–The Entire Series

Part I: Handicapping Your Shot At a Top Business School

Part II: Your Chances of Getting In

Part III: Your Chances of Getting In

Part IV: Handicapping Your Odds of Getting In

Part V: Can You Get Into HBS, Stanford or Wharton?

Part VI: Handicapping Your Dream School Odds

Part VII: Handicapping Your MBA Odds

Part VIII: Getting Through The Elite B-School Screen

Part IX: Handicapping Your B-School Chances

Part X: What Are Your Odds of Getting In?

Part XI: Breaking Through the Elite B-School Screen

Part XII: Handicapping Your B-School Odds

Part XIII: Predicting Your Odds of Getting In

Part XIV: Handicapping Your MBA Odds

Part XV: Assessing Your Odds of Getting In

Part XVI: Handicapping Your Odds of Getting In

Part XVII: What Are Your Odds of Getting In

Part XVIII: Assessing Your Odds of Getting In

Part XIX: Handicapping Your MBA Odds

Part XX: What Are Your Odds Of Getting In

Part XXI: Handicapping Your Odds of Acceptance

Part XXII: Handicapping Your Shot At A Top MBA

Part XXIII: Predicting Your Odds of Getting In

Part XXIV: Do You Have The Right Stuff To Get In

Part XXV: Your Odds of Getting Into A Top MBA Program

Part XXVI: Calculating Your Odds of Getting In

Part XXVII: Breaking Through The Elite MBA Screen

Part XXVIII: Handicapping Your Shot At A Top School

Part XXIX: Can You Get Into A Great B-School

Part XXX: Handicapping Your Odds of Getting In

Part XXXI: Calculating Your Odds of Admission

Part XXXII: Handicapping Your Elite MBA Chances

Part XXXIII: Getting Into Your Dream School

Part XXXIV: Handicapping Your Shot At A Top School

Part XXXV: Calculating Your Odds of Getting In

Part XXXVI: What Are Your Chances Of Getting In

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.