IU Kelley | Mr. Advertising Guy
GMAT 650, GPA 3.5
Harvard | Mr. Big 4 To Healthcare Reformer
GRE 338, GPA 4.0 (1st Class Honours - UK - Deans List)
Harvard | Mr. Bomb Squad To Business
GMAT 740, GPA 3.36
Duke Fuqua | Mr. IB Back Office To Front Office/Consulting
GMAT 640, GPA 2.8
Harvard | Mr. Comeback Kid
GMAT 770, GPA 2.8
Yale | Mr. Lawyer Turned Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7
Wharton | Ms. Strategy & Marketing Roles
GMAT 750, GPA 9.66/10
Harvard | Mr. Tech Risk
GMAT 750, GPA 3.6
Chicago Booth | Mr. Whitecoat Businessman
GMAT 740, GPA Equivalent to 3(Wes) and 3.4(scholaro)
MIT Sloan | Ms. Digital Manufacturing To Tech Innovator
GMAT 720, GPA 3.4
Chicago Booth | Mr. Mexican Central Banker
GMAT 730, GPA 95.8/100 (1st in class)
Harvard | Mr. Billion Dollar Startup
GRE 309, GPA 6.75/10
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Healthcare Corporate Development
GMAT 740, GPA 3.5
Columbia | Mr. Developing Social Enterprises
GMAT 750, GPA 3.75
Rice Jones | Mr. Tech Firm Product Manager
GRE 320, GPA 2.7
Yale | Mr. Education Management
GMAT 730, GPA 7.797/10
Columbia | Mr. Neptune
GMAT 750, GPA 3.65
Darden | Ms. Education Management
GRE 331, GPA 9.284/10
Columbia | Mr. Confused Consultant
GMAT 710, GPA 3.2
Harvard | Ms. 2+2 Trader
GMAT 770, GPA 3.9
Harvard | Mr Big 4 To IB
GRE 317, GPA 4.04/5.00
Stanford GSB | Ms. Engineer In Finance – Deferred MBA
GRE 332, GPA 3.94
Chicago Booth | Mr. Corporate Development
GMAT 740, GPA 3.2
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Second Chance In The US
GMAT 760, GPA 2.3
Harvard | Ms. Big 4 M&A Manager
GMAT 750, GPA 2:1 (Upper second-class honours, UK)
Harvard | Mr. Harvard 2+2, Chances?
GMAT 740, GPA 3.2
Wharton | Ms. Negotiator
GMAT 720, GPA 7.9/10

An MBA In Fewer Than 400 Pages?

Image of book cover: "The Curriculum: Everything You Need to Know to Be a Master of Business Arts."Can you really pack a two-year, $250,000-curriculum in a single book? Author and longtime Fortune columnist Stanley Bing sets out to do exactly that in “The Curriculum: Everything You Need to Know to Be a Master of Business Arts.”

If the concept strikes you as preposterous, a peek inside will do little to dispel these doubts. From the accreditation body, the National Association for Serious Study (“dedicated to a number of serious studies”),  to a core curriculum that includes “Not Appearing Stupid” and “Crazy People,” the book offers a satirical take on an overly staid subject. Think Stephen Colbert meets B-school – with infographics.    

The humor, though pointed, is not what’s surprising. Rather, it’s the truth behind Bing’s bold, irreverent approach. Just as “The Office” and “Dilbert” magnify the absurdities of the 9-to-5 grind, so too Bing uses humor to poke holes in accepted business pedagogy. The glossary, for instance, defines marketing as the “art of creating demand for a product or service nobody knows they need,” while mergers are compared with insect marriage: “one spouse, and all its bodily parts, will be eaten as soon as intercourse is done.”

 

For all its flippancy, the book has valuable lessons: write short emails, don’t sound stupid, learn how to bullshit effectively, be respectful but not servile, and ditch the Bluetooth. The book is particularly useful for lessons you can’t get in a classroom: Few B-schools will tell you, on record anyway, that you’re likely to get docked a few points for sporting a hipster ponytail or that sipping a happy-hour Sprite instead of scotch could result in subtle shunning.  Academic institutions fail to explain that your boss could very will be a raging psychopath, or that your coworkers will display at least one type of crazy – much less how to deal with them.

Without the strictures of academia, Bing throws political correctness to the wind and offers his readers a crash course on business boiled down to what it really is: interactions between humans for money and all the complications that invites. While the book is not likely to replace an MBA, it’s certainly a solid guide for navigating the nuances of business.

Stanley Bing is the author of The Curriculum: Everything You Need to Know to Be a Master of Business Arts

Stanley Bing is the author of The Curriculum: Everything You Need to Know to Be a Master of Business Arts

In a wide-ranging interview with Poets&Quants, Bing lays out his motivations for the book, where B-schools are missing the mark, and his top advice for business students.  

What prompted you to write the book?

I’ve written a lot of books that straddle the line between whimsy and advice. In “What Would Machiavelli Do?” I explored why mean people do so well in business and in “Crazy Bosses” I explored the idea that pathology, which would be liability in any other venue, can be an asset in business. So I’ve been thinking about these things and working in corporations for a long time, and I wanted to aggregate a lot of these ideas in a course of study that would explore the irrational like a classical MBA explores the rational.

I’ve always seen business as being more irrational, emotional, personality-driven, and humorous than how it’s portrayed in business writing. I looked at what people study when they get their MBAs. I reviewed the curricula of top business schools, including Kellogg, Harvard, Stanford, and Stern. Much of it didn’t speak to me or the skills that deliver success to people I’ve known. So I did an alternative curriculum.