Harvard | Mr. Consumer Goods Senior Manager
GMAT 740, GPA 8.27/10
MIT Sloan | Mr. Indian Healthcare Analytics
GMAT 720, GPA 7.8
Stanford GSB | Mr. Filipino Startup
GMAT 710, GPA 3.7
Harvard | Ms. Media Entertainment
GMAT 740, GPA 3.3
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Evolving Teacher
GRE 328, GPA 3.26
Columbia | Mr. Indian I-Banker
GMAT 740, GPA 8.63
Cornell Johnson | Ms. Chef Instructor
GMAT 760, GPA 3.3
UCLA Anderson | Ms. Tech-y Athlete
GRE , GPA 3.63
Harvard | Mr. Deferred Financial Poet
GMAT 710, GPA 3.68
Harvard | Mr. Lieutenant To Consultant
GMAT 760, GPA 3.7
Berkeley Haas | Ms. EV Evangelist
GRE 334, GPA 2.67
Wharton | Ms. Product Manager
GMAT 730, GPA 3.4
Wharton | Mr. Indian Engineer + MBA Now In Consulting
GMAT 760, GPA 8.7 / 10
Chicago Booth | Mr. EduTech
GRE 337, GPA 3.9
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Indonesian Salesperson
GMAT 660, GPA 3.49
Berkeley Haas | Mr. LGBT+CPG
GMAT 720, GPA 3.95
McCombs School of Business | Ms. Tech For Non-Profits
GRE 312, GPA 3.2
Harvard | Mr. Combat Pilot Non-Profit Leader
GRE 329, GPA 3.73
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Actual Poet
GMAT 720, GPA 12.0/14
Harvard | Mr. Healthcare Administration & Policy Latino Advocate
GRE 324, GPA 3.4
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Asian Mexican Finance Hombre
GMAT 650, GPA 2.967
Columbia | Mr. Fintech Data Scientist
GMAT 710, GPA 3.66
Tuck | Mr. Opportunities In MBB
GMAT 710, GPA 3.4
Stanford GSB | Mr. Co-Founder & Analytics Manager
GMAT 750, GPA 7.4 out of 10.0 - 4th in Class
Harvard | Mr. Strategy For Social Good
GRE 325, GPA 3.5
MIT Sloan | Mr. Spaniard
GMAT 710, GPA 7 out of 10 (top 15%)
NYU Stern | Ms. Hopeful NYU Stern Marketing Ph.D.
GRE 297, GPA 2.8

Why U.S. News Whacked NYU Stern

NYU Stern Dean Peter Henry was shocked last week when U.S. News told him his school had fallen to a rank of

NYU Stern Dean Peter Henry was shocked last week when U.S. News told him his school had fallen to a rank of

Last week when New York University Stern School Dean Peter Henry was told his school would fall nine places to rank 20th in U.S. News’ forthcoming list, he had to be shocked. Ever since the magazine began ranking MBA programs in 1989, Stern had never ranked so low. Last year the school’s full-time MBA placed 11th. Its worst ranking ever was 14th. There was no obvious reason for that big a fall to 20th this year. After all, there was little change in the school’s year-over-year metrics used by U.S. News to rank the best full-time MBA programs.

Sure, Stern’s acceptance rate had inched higher to 20.0%, from 18.1% a year earlier. Some 89.0% of last year’s MBAs had jobs three months after graduation, down from 90.4% the previous year. But some of the school’s stats, including its employment rate at commencement, had actually improved, along with the starting pay last year’s graduates received.

Was it even remotely possible that Stern could plunge nine places to its lowest rank ever? Dean Henry says that when he heard the news, he was “surprised” in what has to be an understatement. We “looked at the data, and found that Stern’s scores were higher than a number of other schools with higher ranks. So we challenged their ranking of Stern,” he recounts.

OMISSION WAS ‘WHOLLY UNINTENTIONAL’ & ITS VALUE WAS NEARLY IDENTICAL TO LAST YEAR

The dean quickly discovered that his school had unintentionally omitted one data point out of more than 300 asked for by U.S. News. It was the number of incoming students who had taken the GMAT test. The magazine relies on this statistic in its ranking model to to determine the strength of a school’s entering class relative to other programs. The magazine has been burned in the past by a few schools, including Tulane University’s Freeman School, that sent in fraudulent information to be ranked higher. So it takes a tough line on both omissions and the submission of wrong data.

Yet, in this case, the school told U.S. News it was merely a simple mistake. “The data point has been provided by Stern in previous years,” Henry wrote in an email to students last night, “and its omission was wholly unintentional; its value was nearly identical to that we submitted last year. In lieu of the missing data point, U.S. News informed us that they used an ‘estimated’ number, though we have not been told what this estimate was, on what it was based, or how it was factored into the computation. Nor did U.S. News flag the missing data point in the final step of their data verification process, and unfortunately, Stern’s internal reviews did not pick up the omission, either.”

Instead of calling up Stern and asking for the missing piece of information, U.S. News—which is ranking tens of thousands of schools in business, law, medicine, engineering and education at the same time—chose to use its estimate which severely penalized Stern. When school officials tried to give U.S. News the previously omitted information, the magazine refused to re-run all its rankings calculations.

Page 1 of 2