McCombs School of Business | Ms. Registered Nurse Entrepreneur
GMAT 630, GPA 3.59
Wharton | Mr. Rates Trader
GMAT 750, GPA 7.6/10
Tuck | Mr. Engineer To Start-up
GRE 326, GPA 3.57
Columbia | Mr. RE Investment
GMAT 720, GPA 3.0
Harvard | Ms. Big 4 M&A Manager
GMAT 750, GPA 2:1 (Upper second-class honours, UK)
Wharton | Mr. Firmware Engineer
GMAT 730, GPA 9.04 (scale of 10)
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Captain CornDawg
GRE 305, GPA 4.0
Tepper | Ms. Coding Tech Leader
GMAT 680, GPA 2.9
Harvard | Mr. Tech Start-Up
GMAT 720, GPA 3.52
Chicago Booth | Mr. Banker To CPG Leader
GMAT 760, GPA 7.36/10
Chicago Booth | Mr. Desi Boy
GMAT 740, GPA 3.0
Stanford GSB | Mr. Impactful Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7
Kellogg | Mr. Hopeful Engineer
GMAT 720, GPA 7.95/10 (College follows relative grading; Avg. estimate around 7-7.3)
Rice Jones | Mr. Simple Manufacturer
GRE 320, GPA 3.95
Chicago Booth | Mr. Corporate Development
GMAT 740, GPA 3.2
Stanford GSB | Mr. Former SEC Athlete
GMAT 620, GPA 3.8
Tuck | Mr. Army To MBB
GMAT 740, GPA 2.97
Columbia | Mr. Forbes 30 Under 30
GMAT 730, GPA 3.4
Stanford GSB | Mr. MBB Advanced Analytics
GMAT 750, GPA 3.1
Ross | Mr. Leading-Edge Family Business
GMAT 740, GPA 2.89
Darden | Mr. Logistics Guy
GRE Not taken Yet, GPA 3.1
Kellogg | Mr. Stylist & Actor
GMAT 760 , GPA 9.5
Columbia | Mr. Ambitious Chemical Salesman
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Mr. Irish Biotech Entrepreneur
GMAT 730, GPA 3.2
Stanford GSB | Mr. Cricketer Turned Engineer
GMAT 770, GPA 7.15/10
Wharton | Mr. Planes And Laws
GRE 328, GPA 3.8
McCombs School of Business | Mr. Refrad
GMAT 700, GPA 3.94

MBA Essays: How To Write About Weakness

To wrap up our series on major application essay topics, here are a few thoughts on the weakness essay. I bet it’s your favorite!

You, like everyone else, doesn’t like to write about (or think about) your flaws, especially when you are striving to present a desirable portrait of yourself. But if that’s what the application asks for, then just as with the criticism question, that is what you must provide. In fact, by answering the weakness question thoughtfully, you’ll be adding to your desirability, not detracting from it.

Here are a few tips to help you get started:

  1. Be honest. Don’t try and make up a flaw that’s really a positive attribute in a shallow, transparent attempt to look good. Skip the “I’m a sucker for detail” flaw – being detail-oriented is a good thing. The same thing goes for “I work too hard” – a strong work ethic is good. As long as OCD isn’t involved, don’t pretend otherwise.
  2. Remain personally focused and take responsibility. Don’t discuss the blemishes of other people as a way to minimize yours or transfer responsibility AKA blame.
  3. Write about traits that are relevant to management. For example, a weakness for chocolate is…a weakness indeed, but it’s not directly relevant to business school or your career.
  4. Finally, discuss how you’ve addressed your weakness. The only way to turn talking about your weaknesses into a strength is to talk about the steps you’ve taken to address the defect. If your quant skills are weak, have you enrolled in courses that will boost them (statistics, accounting, etc.). If you had difficulties delegating when you first became a manager, discuss how you learned to delegate more effectively and tell about a more recent managerial experience where your led an effective, efficient team.
  5. Try to choose a weakness from a few years ago and from an arena of your life not discussed in other essays. Doing so allows you to reveal another side of you and also gives you more opportunity to show growth.

All human beings have weaknesses. The ones who succeed are aware of them and work to minimize them. Use this essay to show that you belong to this group of winners.

By Linda Abraham, CEO and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the soon-to released book, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools. Linda has been helping MBA applicants gain acceptance to top MBA programs since 1994.

Our Series On Perfecting Your MBA Essays: