Wharton | Mr. Indian Financial Engineer
GMAT 750, GPA 4.0
Stanford GSB | Mr. Mobility Nut
GMAT 740, GPA 3.8
UCLA Anderson | Mr. The Average Indian
GMAT 680, GPA 3.7
Darden | Ms. Structural Design Engineer
GMAT 750, GPA 3.6
Tuck | Mr. Alpinist
GRE 324, GPA 3.6
Kellogg | Mr. Another Strategy Consultant
GMAT 720, GPA 5.5/10
UCLA Anderson | Mr. Renewable Energy Sales Manager
GMAT 700, GPA 3.9
Ross | Mr. Military To Corporate
GRE 326, GPA 7.47/10
Harvard | Mr. Tourist Development Of India
GMAT 680, GPA 3
Harvard | Mr. Strategy Consultant Middle East
GMAT 760, GPA 3.4
Harvard | Mr Big 4 To IB
GRE 317, GPA 4.04/5.00
Stanford GSB | Mr. Aspiring Unicorn Founder
GMAT Haven't taken, GPA 3.64
Harvard | Mr. Double Bachelor’s Investment Banker
GMAT 780, GPA 3.9
Wharton | Mr. Non-Profit Researcher
GMAT 730, GPA 3.6
NYU Stern | Ms. Indian PC
GRE 328, GPA 3.2
Harvard | Mr. French In Japan
GMAT 720, GPA 14,3/20 (French Scale), Top 10%
Harvard | Mr. Aspiring Human
GMAT Not yet given but sample test shows 700, GPA 7 out of 7
Kellogg | Ms. Chicago Lawyer
GRE 330, GPA 2.3
Chicago Booth | Mr. Peru PE To Brazil MBB
GMAT 730, GPA 3.7
MIT Sloan | Mr. Fighter Pilot
GMAT 730, GPA 3.0
Stanford GSB | Mr. Resume & MBA/MS Program Guidance
GMAT 650, GPA 2.75
Chicago Booth | Mr. Central American FP&A
GRE 140, GPA 3.0
Columbia | Ms. New York
GMAT 710, GPA 3.25
Cornell Johnson | Mr. Skin Care Engineer
GMAT Expected 730, GPA 7.03/10
MIT Sloan | Ms. FAANG Software Engineer
GMAT 680, GPA 3.8
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Impact Maker
GMAT 690, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Ms. Human Resources
GMAT 730, GPA 73.6%

More Female MBAs, But Still A Long Way To Go

women

Business schools are doing a better job of recruiting and enrolling more female MBA students, but they have a long way to go.

That’s one unmistakable conclusion from the latest gender-specific data published by The Financial Times in its recently published Global MBA ranking. Among the top 100-ranked schools, 19 now have female student numbers over 40%. This figure has almost doubled from just 10 schools last year; 31 schools have female faculty rates above 30%, which is an increase of eight schools from last year.

A number of schools have made considerable improvements in all three areas, female students, faculty and board members. These schools are:

ODDLY, THE TOP-RANKED SCHOOLS ARE FALLING BEHIND

However it is the top-ranked schools, those that have the most influence and prestige for students, that are falling behind.

In our sample of the top 13 business schools, about half (six) have female student representation over 40%, with the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School and Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management both leading at 43%. Only one school has student numbers below 30%. The school that fares worst in this measure is Spain’s IE Business School, with a low rate of just 29% female students.

Across these same schools, only the IE Business School has female faculty numbers above 30%. In fact, almost half of the top 13 schools still have female faculty numbers below 20%. These schools still have not fathomed the importance of gender balance at the front of the classroom.

So, how have things progressed in comparison to where these 13* schools were last year?

The figures above indicate there has been a positive movement towards achieving a more representative female student community over the last year.

Business schools are waking up to the fact they need more women in all areas of their institutions. Focusing on increasing female student numbers is the first step.

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