Kellogg | Mr. Danish Raised, US Based
GMAT 710, GPA 10.6 out of 12
Wharton | Mr. African Impact
GMAT 720, GPA 3.8
Ross | Mr. Law To MBA
GRE 321, GPA 3.77
Wharton | Mr. MBA When Ready
GMAT 700 (expected), GPA 2.1
Harvard | Mr. Sommelier
GMAT 710, GPA 3.62
Kellogg | Mr. AVP Healthcare
GRE 332, GPA 3.3
HEC Paris | Mr. Strategy & Intelligence
GMAT 600 - 650 (estimated), GPA 4.0
INSEAD | Mr. Powerlifting President
GMAT 750, GPA 8.1/10
Harvard | Mr. Mojo
GMAT 720, GPA 3.3
Harvard | Mr. Green Energy Revolution
GMAT 740, GPA 3.4
Harvard | Ms. Analytical Leader
GMAT 760, GPA 3.9
Stanford GSB | Ms. Top Firm Consulting
GMAT 710, GPA 3.7
Stanford GSB | Mr. Technopreneur
GRE 328, GPA 3.2
Harvard | Mr. Schoolmaster
GMAT 710 (to re-take), GPA 3.5 (Converted from UK)
INSEAD | Mr. Sustainability PM
GRE 335, GPA 3.5
Cambridge Judge Business School | Ms. Story-Teller To Data-Cruncher
GMAT 700 (anticipated), GPA 3.5 (converted from Australia)
Kellogg | Mr. Operator
GMAT 740, GPA 4.17/4.3
INSEAD | Mr. Truth
GMAT 670, GPA 3.2
INSEAD | Mr. Business Manager
GMAT 750, GPA 3.0
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Army Marketing
GRE 327, GPA 3.8
Harvard | Mr. STEM Minor
GMAT 740, GPA 3.78
Stanford GSB | Mr. Failed Startup Founder
GMAT 740, GPA 4
HEC Paris | Mr. Productivity Focused
GMAT 700, GPA 3.6
MIT Sloan | Mr. Energy Transition
GMAT 760, GPA 3.95
Stanford GSB | Mr. MBB to PM
GRE 338, GPA 4.0
McCombs School of Business | Mr. CRE
GMAT 625, GPA 3.4
Emory Goizueta | Mr. Tech Engineer
GRE 310, GPA 4.0

Biggest Myths About Wharton’s MBA Program

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Biggest Myths About Wharton’s MBA Program

The Wharton School consistently ranks as one of the most prestigious MBA programs in the nation.

The Class of 2019 averaged $150,000 in base pay alone, up $15,000 over the previous year. In total, a starting pay package for a Wharton MBA exceeds $175,000, with over 98% of the class receiving job offers within three months of graduation.

Translation: The Wharton brand carries prestige and delivers results.

But when it comes to applying to the prestigious program, experts say it’s important to separate fact from fiction.

In a recent blog post, Blair Mannix, Director of Admissions for the Wharton MBA Program, debunked the top myths around the full-time MBA program. Here is a sample…

I NEED A BACKGROUND IN FINANCE OR CONSULTING

One of the biggest misconceptions about applying to Wharton is that you need to have a background in either finance or consulting.

Mannix says that’s not true.

“Wharton accepts students from an array of backgrounds, including non-profit, government, military, energy, and technology industries,” Mannix writes. “The employers who come to campus are increasingly diverse. We admit students who will make the most of our community. Because of the diversity and breadth of the Wharton culture, community, and career resources, our programs are not exclusive to finance and consulting.”

And the numbers don’t lie. While 25% of the class of 2021 has a background in consulting, technology and non-profit/government make up 9% of the class, with healthcare making up 5% of the class.

Additionally, 43% of the class of 2021 majored in humanities in undergrad with 30% majoring in STEM.

WHARTON IS SUPER COMPETITIVE

There’s a big misconception, Mannix says, that Wharton is a hugely competitive atmosphere that’s a tough fit for some.

“This is not true,” she writes. “Students tell us all the time, ‘This place was totally different than what I thought it was going to be. I thought Wharton was competitive and cutthroat, but it’s actually really not. Everybody’s really nice.’ There is a false perception that Wharton has a competitive culture.”

I’LL END UP BEING PIGEONHOLED INTO A FINANCE CAREER

Many think that if they attend Wharton, they’ll end up with a career in finance.

But, Mannix says, this simply isn’t true. And she has the numbers to back it.

According to the 2019 MBA Career Report, Wharton students accepted full-time offers in a wide range of careers such as technology (14.9%), health care (4.3%), and consumer products (3.4%).

Check out the full list of myths debunked here.

Sources: Wharton, Poets & Quants, Wharton