Kellogg | Mr. Chief Product Officer
GMAT 740, GPA 77.53% (First Class with Distinction, Dean's List Candidate)
Harvard | Mr. Political Consultant
GRE 337, GPA 3.85
MIT Sloan | Mr. Refinery Engineer
GMAT 700- will retake, GPA 3.87
Said Business School | Mr. Across The Pond
GMAT 680, GPA 2.8
Stanford GSB | Mr. Singing Banking Lawyer
GMAT 720, GPA 110-point scale. Got 110/110 with honors
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Hanging By A Thread
GMAT 710, GPA 3.8
Stanford GSB | Mr. Corp Finance
GMAT 740, GPA 3.75
Kellogg | Mr. Marketing Maven
GRE 325, GPA 7.6/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Vroom Vroom
GMAT 760, GPA 2.88
MIT Sloan | Mr. Low GPA Over Achiever
GMAT 700, GPA 2.5
N U Singapore | Ms. Biomanager
GMAT 520, GPA 2.8
Yale | Mr. Army Infantry Officer
GMAT 730, GPA 2.83
Berkeley Haas | Ms. 10 Years Experience
GMAT To be taken, GPA 3.1
Yale | Ms. Social Impact AKS
GRE 315, GPA 7.56
Wharton | Mr. Army & Consulting
GMAT 760, GPA 4.0
Berkeley Haas | Mr. 360 Consultant
GMAT 720, GPA 3.4
Harvard | Mr. Improve Healthcare
GMAT 730, GPA 2.8
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Wake Up & Grind
GMAT 700, GPA 3.5
Darden | Mr. Fintech Nerd
GMAT 740, GPA 7.7/10
Stanford GSB | Mr. Minority Champ
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
Darden | Mr. Senior Energy Engineer
GMAT 710, GPA 2.5
Harvard | Mr. Merchant Of Debt
GMAT 760, GPA 3.5 / 4.0 in Master 1 / 4.0 in Master 2
Stanford GSB | Mr. Indian Telecom ENG
GRE 340, GPA 3.56
Stanford GSB | Ms. East Africa Specialist
GMAT 690, GPA 3.34
Harvard | Mr. Nonprofit Social Entrepreneur
GMAT 740, GPA 3.7
Chicago Booth | Ms. Start-Up Entrepreneur
GRE 318 current; 324 intended, GPA 3.4
Duke Fuqua | Ms. Health Care Executive
GMAT 690, GPA 3.3

Handicapping Your MBA Odds

Mr. Renewable Energy

  • 720 Verbal, 800 Quant GRE
  • 3.65 GPA
  • Undergraduate degree in economics from Santa Clara University
  • Attended Lewis and Clark Law School, concluding studies after the first year with a 3.0 GPA
  • Work experiences includes an energy policy internship at a well-known Washington, D.C., think tank; high level energy utility regulation experience in the Bay Area for four years planning for renewable generation and running a $500 million energy efficiency program
  • Extracurricular involvement as the vice president of my undergraduate student body; volunteer with local San Francisco political candidates; co-author of numerous papers on the status of electricity in California and presented at world renowned events on renewable energy
  • 26-year-old white male

Odds of Success:

Harvard: 30% to 40%

Stanford: 20% to 30%

Wharton: 40+%

Chicago: 50%

Kellogg: 50%

Tuck: 50%

Columbia: 50%

Berkeley: 50%

MIT: 50%

Sandy’s Analysis: Dropping out of law school was better than completing it for B school purposes because you only spent a year there and can say with some authority that it was not for you.  A 720/V and 800/Q GRE is real solid, whether schools consider that the equivalent of a 760 GMAT is an open question with two prongs:

1. They consider that score as proof that you are a real smart guy who is not going to have any problem with the quant stuff that is going to be thrown your way in B-school.

2. They do not consider it a prize that will raise their own GMAT average (even incrementally, as would a real 760 GMAT). So for instance, just as a crazy hypothetical, suppose you had a twin brother with the exact same life except the twin has a 760 GMAT for real. They might take the twin on that count alone. Of course, you don’t have a twin brother, and there is never a twin like that, but you get my drift. A last issue is how consulting firms, which are interested in GMAT scores consider the GMAT v. the GRE.  I don’t know, but my guess is, they will like yours, especially the 800Q.  Any consulting firm experts out there (as there have been in the past),  please post.

Your posted profile is a bit unclear. You say, “Experience:– energy policy internship at well-known Washington, DC think tank– high level energy utility regulation experience in the Bay Area for 4 years (work includes long-term planning for renewable generation and running a 500 million dollar energy efficiency program . . . .”

Are you working for the guv’ment of California? It sounds that way. Or are you a consultant. Viz, “Co-authored numerous papers on the status of electricity in California.  Presented at world renowned events on renewable energy in California.” If you are working for state government, or even the Feds, and have been successful, as it appears, that could be a good platform to apply to B-school.

Anyway, it all knits tightly as a past and present, and even the law school flirtation fits in given the regulatory background. Working for a state government is usually not a good gig for elite schools on the theory that those jobs are not selective. But whatever the case was with your gig, you have made it sound selective, and if it resulted from your internship at the Washington Think Tank then the only question a very cynical adcom might ask is how you got THAT job out of some 3.6-ish performance at Santa Clara (not that there is anything wrong with that school, I was just wondering how many kids it sends to elite think tanks).

Anyway, you did it, and it worked, so at the moment, you are in contention at elite schools (H/W/S) and pretty solid at other Top-10 frequent flyers (Chicago Kellogg, Columbia, Sloan). “Volunteer work with local SF political candidates  . . . .” is an added plus, especially getting your hands dirty with local politics, since a good deal of energy regulation is political.

 

Handicapping Your MBA Odds–The Entire Series

Part I: Handicapping Your Shot At a Top Business School

Part II: Your Chances of Getting In

Part III: Your Chances of Getting In

Part IV: Handicapping Your Odds of Getting In

Part V: Can You Get Into HBS, Stanford or Wharton?

Part VI: Handicapping Your Dream School Odds

Part VII: Handicapping Your MBA Odds

Part VIII: Getting Through The Elite B-School Screen

Part IX: Handicapping Your B-School Chances

Part X: What Are Your Odds of Getting In?

Part XI: Breaking Through the Elite B-School Screen

Part XII: Handicapping Your B-School Odds

Part XIII: Predicting Your Odds of Getting In

Part XIV: Handicapping Your MBA Odds

Part XV: Assessing Your Odds of Getting In

Part XVI: Handicapping Your Odds of Getting In

Part XVII: What Are Your Odds of Getting In

Part XVIII: Assessing Your Odds of Getting In

Part XIX: Handicapping Your MBA Odds

Part XX: What Are Your Odds Of Getting In

Part XXI: Handicapping Your Odds of Acceptance

Part XXII: Handicapping Your Shot At A Top MBA

Part XXIII: Predicting Your Odds of Getting In

Part XXIV: Do You Have The Right Stuff To Get In

Part XXV: Your Odds of Getting Into A Top MBA Program

Part XXVI: Calculating Your Odds of Getting In

Part XXVII: Breaking Through The Elite MBA Screen

Part XXVIII: Handicapping Your Shot At A Top School

Part XXIX: Can You Get Into A Great B-School

Part XXX: Handicapping Your Odds of Getting In

Part XXXI: Calculating Your Odds of Admission

Part XXXII: Handicapping Your Elite MBA Chances

Part XXXIII: Getting Into Your Dream School

Part XXXIV: Handicapping Your Shot At A Top School

Part XXXV: Calculating Your Odds of Getting In

Part XXXVI: What Are Your Chances Of Getting In

Part XXXVII: Handicapping Your Business School Odds

Part XXXVIII: Assessing Your B-School Odds Of Making It

Part XXXIX: Handicapping MBA Applicant Odds

Part XL: What Are Your Odds of Getting In

Part XLI: Handicapping Your Odds of MBA Success

Part XLII: What Are Your Chances Of Getting In

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.