Kellogg | Mr. Texan Adventurer
GMAT 740, GPA 3.5
Tuck | Mr. Metamorphosis
GRE 324, GPA 3.15
Stanford GSB | Ms. Retail Innovator
GMAT 750, GPA 3.84
MIT Sloan | Mr. Unicorn Strategy
GMAT 740 (estimated), GPA 3.7
Darden | Ms. Teaching-To-Tech
GRE 326, GPA 3.47
Cambridge Judge | Mr. Nuclear Manager
GMAT 700, GPA 2.4
London Business School | Ms. Aussie Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 3.5
Kellogg | Mr. Geography Techie
GMAT 740, GPA 3.9
Stanford GSB | Mr. Aussie Sustainability
GMAT 650 (retaking to boost chances), GPA 4
Wharton | Mr. Food & Beverage
GMAT 720, GPA 3.75
Stanford GSB | Just Jim
GRE 335, GPA 3.99
London Business School | Mr. Impact Financier
GMAT 750, GPA 7.35/10
Kellogg | Mr. Sales Engineer
GMAT 740, GPA 3.00
Columbia | Ms. Mechanical Engineer
GMAT 610, GPA 3.72
Georgetown McDonough | Ms. CRA11
GMAT 720, GPA 3.61
Harvard | Mr. Impact Investment
GMAT 760, GPA 3.2
Harvard | Mr. Private Equity
GMAT 750, GPA 3.8
Columbia | Mr. Worker Bee
GMAT 710, GPA 3.56
Columbia | Mr. Alien
GMAT 700, GPA 3.83
Columbia | Mr. MD
GMAT 630, GPA 3.24
Duke Fuqua | Mr. Digital Marketing Analyst
GMAT 710, GPA 3.27
Stanford GSB | Mr. Financial Controller
GRE Yet to Take, Target is ~330, GPA 2.5
Harvard | Mr. AI in Asia
GMAT 760, GPA 3.25
IMD | Mr. Future Large Corp
GMAT 720, GPA 3.0
Berkeley Haas | Mr. Career Coach
GRE 292, GPA 3.468
Marshall School of Business | Mr. Strategy Consultant
GMAT 730, GPA 4.0
NYU Stern | Mr. Long Shot
GRE 303, GPA 2.75

Stanford: International Student Record

An aerial view of Stanford’s new nine-building complex for its business school.

Stanford Graduate School of Business enrolled an all-time high of international students this year, a record 42% of the 398 students that make up the Class of 2014. Stanford said the international students hail from 53 non-U.S. countries.

At the same time, U.S. minority representation in the class plunged to 20% from 27% last year. The school explained that the number “reverted from last year’s 20-year high…to a more typical level.” Minorities composed 23% of the class in academic year 2010-11 and 21% in 2009-10.

The statistics come from a recently published profile of this fall’s incoming students on Stanford’s website. The school said applications for the class totaled 6,716, up slightly from 6,618 a year earlier, but still down from 7,204 two years ago.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS INCREASED BY FOUR PERCENTAGE POINTS

The spike in international students was especially surprising. The 42% representation reflects a four-point jump in a single year. Last year, 38% of Stanford’s incoming class came from outside the U.S., and in the 2009-2010 academic year, only 33% of the class was international. In recent years, however, a flood of highly qualified applicants have emerged from both China and India.

By way of comparison, some 34% of Harvard Business School’s latest class is international. Harvard, however, has had more success in enrolling a larger percentage of women, 40% this year vs. Stanford’s 35%, and U.S. minorities, 24% this year vs. Stanford’s 20%.

“These fluctuations also speak to our admission process,” said Stanford. “We don’t admit categories; we admit individuals. There are no quotas or targets in the admission process, and each applicant is evaluated entirely on his or her own merits. This is why we consider a class profile illustrative, rather than informative. In truth, there is no metric that can measure character.”

NUMBER OF SCHOOLS AND ORGANIZATIONS REPRESENTED IN CLASS REACHED AN ALL-TIME HIGH

The school’s admissions group also made a point of noting that “two-thirds of our new students are the sole person to come directly from that organization.” An earlier analysis by Poets&Quants had discovered that a mere dozen of the most elite consulting and investment banking firms accounted for more than a third of the students in Stanford’s Class of 2013 (see Top Feeder Companies To Stanford).

About The Author

John A. Byrne is the founder and editor-in-chief of C-Change Media, publishers of Poets&Quants and four other higher education websites. He has authored or co-authored more than ten books, including two New York Times bestsellers. John is the former executive editor of Businessweek, editor-in-chief of Businessweek. com, editor-in-chief of Fast Company, and the creator of the first regularly published rankings of business schools. As the co-founder of CentreCourt MBA Festivals, he hopes to meet you at the next MBA event in-person or online.